Reporting the news… living the news

To report what hurts us, to write about what we have encountered, touched, suffered, transcends the journalistic experience to become a living testimony. The distance between articles about a man on a hunger strike and the act of feeling his ribs protruding from his sides, is an abyss. Thus, no interview can reproduce the tear filled eyes of Clara, Guillermo Fariñas’ wife, while she tells me that for their daughter her father has a stomach illness and so grows thinner every day. Not even a long report could manage to describe the panic induced by the camera which, a hundred yards from the home of this Villa Claran, observes and films everyone who approaches number 615A Calle Alemán.

To accumulate paragraphs, compile quotes and show recordings, fails to convey the odor of the emergency room where Fariñas was moved yesterday. My guilt for having come too late to beg him to eat again, to persuade him to avoid irreversible damage to his health, is unbearable. On the drive there I wove together some phrases to convince him not to carry on to the end, but before coming into the city a text message confirmed he was hospitalized. I would have said to him, “You have already accomplished it, you have helped to remove their mask,” but instead of this I had to offer words of consolation to his family, sitting in his absence in that room in the humble neighborhood of La Chirusa.

Why have they brought us to this point? How can they close all the paths of dialog, debate, healthy dissent and necessary criticism? When this kind of protest, a protest of empty stomachs, happens in a country we have to question whether they have left citizens any other way to show their lack of consent. Fariñas knows they will never give him one minute on the radio, that his voice cannot rise up, without penalty, in a public place. Refusing to eat was the way he found to show the desperation and despair of living under a system that gags and masks his most important “conquests.”

Coco cannot die. Because in the long funeral procession that is taking Orlando Zapata Tamayo, our voice and the rights of citizens which they killed long ago… there is no room for one more death.

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96 thoughts on “Reporting the news… living the news

  1. To m pineiro losada:

    Newsflash….Cuba already is a “slave plantation for the imperialist project.” The imperialists are named Fidel and Raul. I’ve seen some of the real pictures of the deplorable conditions of the hospitals where the average Cuban receives free “healthcare.” I wouldn’t send my dog to one of these facilities. Where you see a socialist paradise, we see Cuba’s citizens having to live like babies, having every aspect of their lives proscribed for them by those who live very differently indeed. For your information, there are two tiers of free healthcare in Cuba, one for the ordinary people and one for those connected to the “government” or rather “dictatorship.” Why aren’t Cubans free to travel wherever and whenever they choose? Don’t think for a minute that the rest of the free world does not know what goes on day to day in Cuba. Thanks, blogueros, for exposing what life is really like for you. Keep up the good work and, hopefully, you will soon be free.

  2. Using the old slogans about oligarchies, corruption & repression …?
    By its definition, oligarchy is the goverment of the few, by persons, by families …
    Does it sound familiar?
    You talk about corruption & exploitation?
    Everyone in Cuba has housing, food, medical coverage & education … equally …
    Who dictates what are the necesities of the cubans?
    Who decides what that equality is? who decides the availability, the quantities, the timing of such a provided “right”?
    It seems to me that if a “few” control the power in a society that society is: an oligachy.
    It also seems to me, since those “few” “control” all aspects of the cuban citizen’s life … those few, are in fact “dictating” life … aren’t they.
    With obligatory demostrations of loyalty, with “block regulators” spying in their life; with the constant vigilance about what they say & to whom … & another thing say … when presented w/the choice of black market purchases as or use of regime’s rations … why? everything is plentiful & accessible … why?
    When the use of your currency is in itself an exercise in self preservation …
    You dare talk about rampant corruption?
    Are you saying that the people of Cuba is corrupt & surely ungratefull? are you saying that the people of Cuba is lazy looking only for themselves rather than the good of all?
    So Cuba has a goverment of the people, for the people by the people …
    The goverment of Cuba is by (from the begining) appoinment, w/guns, hereditary from fidel to raul, integrated by the few … hey … its an oligarchy …!
    Propaganda, slogans … in this day & age where information is readily available, your facts may be proven as lies in no time flat …
    We aware losada … use the truth, not as you see it …use the truth as it is …

  3. This is a small sample:

    The EU Parliament condemned the death of Cuban political prisoner Orlando Zapata Tamayo and demanded that Havana immediately release all its political prisoners.

    The French government asked the Castro brothers’ regime to release its political prisoners and expressed concern for Fariñas’ well-being.

    Reporters Without Borders accused the Cuban government of being “pitiless” to dissident journalists, and demanded the “immediate release” of all journalists held prisoner on the communist-ruled island. Also said it was “especially concerned” about the state of health of dissident reporter Guillermo “Coco” Fariñas, who has been on a hunger strike for the last eight days.

    The President of Costa Rica Oscar Arias said “Political prisoners do not exist in democracies. No one goes to prison for thinking differently in any country that is truly free. Cuba can put forth all its efforts and oratory to try to sell that its democracy is special, but with each political prisoner comes a de facto negation of that affirmation. Each political prisoner is irrefutable proof of authoritarianism.”

    Former Polish president and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Lech Walesa, reminded Fariñas that Cuba needs men like him to live, to continue to lead the struggle for liberty.

    Chile’s President-elect Sebastián Piñera issued a statement harshly condemning the circumstances surrounding the death of Zapata, who he said “gave his life to defend democracy and freedom in Cuba.”

    Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said: “The United States government deeply regrets the death of Orlando Zapata Tamayo and we send our condolences to his family and we also reiterate our strong objection to the actions of the Cuban government,”

    Spanish Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero reacted to the death of a Cuban political prisoner on hunger strike by demanding that the island’s communist government release its prisoners of conscience and respect human rights.

  4. This is a small sample:

    The EU Parliament condemned the death of Cuban political prisoner Orlando Zapata Tamayo and demanded that Havana immediately release all its political prisoners. Link: http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=353525&CategoryId=14510

    The French government asked the Castro brothers’ regime to release its political prisoners and expressed concern for Fariñas’ well-being.
    Link: http://www.diariodecuba.net/cuba/81-cuba/621-paris-exige-la-liberacion-de-todos-los-presos-politicos-en-cuba.html

    Reporters Without Borders accused the Cuban government of being “pitiless” to dissident journalists, and demanded the “immediate release” of all journalists held prisoner on the communist-ruled island. Also said it was “especially concerned” about the state of health of dissident reporter Guillermo “Coco” Fariñas, who has been on a hunger strike for the last eight days.
    Link: http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=353291&CategoryId=14510

    The President of Costa Rica Oscar Arias said “Political prisoners do not exist in democracies. No one goes to prison for thinking differently in any country that is truly free. Cuba can put forth all its efforts and oratory to try to sell that its democracy is special, but with each political prisoner comes a de facto negation of that affirmation. Each political prisoner is irrefutable proof of authoritarianism.”
    Link: http://es.noticias.yahoo.com/9/20100310/twl-entre-fuertes-criticas-a-cuba-arias-e1e34ad.html

    Former Polish president and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Lech Walesa, reminded Fariñas that Cuba needs men like him to live, to continue to lead the struggle for liberty.
    Link: http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/news/wreath_7483310

    Chile’s President-elect Sebastián Piñera issued a statement harshly condemning the circumstances surrounding the death of Zapata, who he said “gave his life to defend democracy and freedom in Cuba.”
    Link: http://www.ipsnews.net/news.asp?idnews=50537

    Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said: “The United States government deeply regrets the death of Orlando Zapata Tamayo and we send our condolences to his family and we also reiterate our strong objection to the actions of the Cuban government,”
    Link: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/02/25/AR2010022502528.html

    Spanish Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero reacted to the death of a Cuban political prisoner on hunger strike by demanding that the island’s communist government release its prisoners of conscience and respect human rights.
    Link: http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=352886&CategoryId=14510

  5. This is a small sample:

    The EU Parliament condemned the death of Cuban political prisoner Orlando Zapata Tamayo and demanded that Havana immediately release all its political prisoners. Link: http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=353525&CategoryId=14510

    The French government asked the Castro brothers’ regime to release its political prisoners and expressed concern for Fariñas’ well-being. Link: http://www.diariodecuba.net/cuba/81-cuba/621-paris-exige-la-liberacion-de-todos-los-presos-politicos-en-cuba.html

    Reporters Without Borders accused the Cuban government of being “pitiless” to dissident journalists, and demanded the “immediate release” of all journalists held prisoner on the communist-ruled island. Also said it was “especially concerned” about the state of health of dissident reporter Guillermo “Coco” Fariñas, who has been on a hunger strike for the last eight days. Link: http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=353291&CategoryId=14510

    The President of Costa Rica Oscar Arias said “Political prisoners do not exist in democracies. No one goes to prison for thinking differently in any country that is truly free. Cuba can put forth all its efforts and oratory to try to sell that its democracy is special, but with each political prisoner comes a de facto negation of that affirmation. Each political prisoner is irrefutable proof of authoritarianism.” . Link: http://es.noticias.yahoo.com/9/20100310/twl-entre-fuertes-criticas-a-cuba-arias-e1e34ad.html

    Former Polish president and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Lech Walesa, reminded Fariñas that Cuba needs men like him to live, to continue to lead the struggle for liberty. Link: http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/news/wreath_7483310

    Chile’s President-elect Sebastián Piñera issued a statement harshly condemning the circumstances surrounding the death of Zapata, who he said “gave his life to defend democracy and freedom in Cuba.” Link: http://www.ipsnews.net/news.asp?idnews=50537

    Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said: “The United States government deeply regrets the death of Orlando Zapata Tamayo and we send our condolences to his family and we also reiterate our strong objection to the actions of the Cuban government,” Link: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/02/25/AR2010022502528.html

    Spanish Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero reacted to the death of a Cuban political prisoner on hunger strike by demanding that the island’s communist government release its prisoners of conscience and respect human rights. Link: http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=352886&CategoryId=14510

  6. The Free World condemnation of Orlando Zapata death and demand of the release of political prisoners is a very compelling reason for the regime to negotiate.

    The tragic death of Orlando Zapata and the hunger strike by Guillermo Fariñas have not been in vain.

    The Castro brothers’ regime has been pressured by foreign governments, world leaders, foreign press, and world organizations with their demands that political prisoners be released from prison and their regrets for the death of Orlando Zapata Tamayo a Cuban political prisoner on hunger strike.

  7. The Free World condemnation of Orlando Zapata death and demand of the release of political prisoners is a very compelling reason for the regime to negotiate.

    The tragic death of Orlando Zapata and the hunger strike by Guillermo Fariñas have not been in vain.

    The Castro brothers’ regime has been pressured by foreign governments, world leaders, foreign press, and world organizations with their demands that political prisoners be released from prison and their regrets for the death of Orlando Zapata Tamayo a Cuban political prisoner on hunger strike. Here is a small sample:

    The EU Parliament condemned the death of Cuban political prisoner Orlando Zapata Tamayo and demanded that Havana immediately release all its political prisoners. Link: http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=353525&CategoryId=14510

    The French government asked the Castro brothers’ regime to release its political prisoners and expressed concern for Fariñas’ well-being. Link: http://www.diariodecuba.net/cuba/81-cuba/621-paris-exige-la-liberacion-de-todos-los-presos-politicos-en-cuba.html

    Reporters Without Borders accused the Cuban government of being “pitiless” to dissident journalists, and demanded the “immediate release” of all journalists held prisoner on the communist-ruled island. Also said it was “especially concerned” about the state of health of dissident reporter Guillermo “Coco” Fariñas, who has been on a hunger strike for the last eight days. Link: http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=353291&CategoryId=14510

    The President of Costa Rica Oscar Arias said “Political prisoners do not exist in democracies. No one goes to prison for thinking differently in any country that is truly free. Cuba can put forth all its efforts and oratory to try to sell that its democracy is special, but with each political prisoner comes a de facto negation of that affirmation. Each political prisoner is irrefutable proof of authoritarianism.” . Link: http://es.noticias.yahoo.com/9/20100310/twl-entre-fuertes-criticas-a-cuba-arias-e1e34ad.html

    Former Polish president and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Lech Walesa, reminded Fariñas that Cuba needs men like him to live, to continue to lead the struggle for liberty. Link: http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/news/wreath_7483310

    Chile’s President-elect Sebastián Piñera issued a statement harshly condemning the circumstances surrounding the death of Zapata, who he said “gave his life to defend democracy and freedom in Cuba.” Link: http://www.ipsnews.net/news.asp?idnews=50537
    Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said: “The United States government deeply regrets the death of Orlando Zapata Tamayo and we send our condolences to his family and we also reiterate our strong objection to the actions of the Cuban government,” Link: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/02/25/AR2010022502528.html

    Spanish Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero reacted to the death of a Cuban political prisoner on hunger strike by demanding that the island’s communist government release its prisoners of conscience and respect human rights. Link: http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=352886&CategoryId=14510
    Europe – Cuba NGO Network calls for the release of all prisoners of conscience, particularly those in critical health conditions. Link: http://www.cubalog.eu/index.php?id=2&news=95

    Amnesty International has urged Cuba to release all political prisoners after the death of detained activist Orlando Zapata Tamayo who had been on hunger strike. Link: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/8534746.stm

    El Pais.com.es http://www.elpais.com/articulo/internacional/cubano/Farinas/recupera/consciencia/elpepuint/20100312elpepuint_1/Tes

    Canada.com http://www.canada.com/news/Cuban+hunger+striker+hospitalized+critical+condition/2672374/story.html

    Chicago Tribune http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/sns-ap-cb-cuba-hunger-striker,0,7538280.story

    The Miami Herald http://www.miamiherald.com/2010/03/11/1523465/cuban-dissident-felix-bonne-carcasses.html

    RADIO NETHERLANDS WORLDWIDE http://www.rnw.nl/africa/article/die-cuba-live

    USA TODAY http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2010-03-08-cuba-protest_N.htm?csp=34&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+UsatodaycomWorld-TopStories+(News+-+World+-+Top+Stories)

    TODAY msnbc.com

    http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/35837268/ns/health/

    THE HUFFINGTON POST

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/huff-wires/20100312/cb-cuba-hunger-striker/

    Townhall.com http://townhall.com/news/world/2010/03/12/cuban_hunger_striker_in_hospital_after_passing_out?page=full&comments=true

    World Opinion Joins to Mourn, and Save, the Lives of Cuba’s Hunger Strikers

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/yoani-sanchez/world-opinion-joins-to-mo_b_498742.html

  8. Free World condemnation of Orlando Zapata death and demand the release of political prisoners.

    The tragic death of Orlando Zapata and the hunger strike by Guillermo Fariñas have not been in vain.

    The Castro brothers’ regime has been pressured by foreign governments, world leaders, foreign press, and world organizations with their demands that political prisoners be released from prison and their regrets for the death of Orlando Zapata Tamayo a Cuban political prisoner on hunger strike.

    The EU Parliament condemned the death of Cuban political prisoner Orlando Zapata Tamayo and demanded that Havana immediately release all its political prisoners. Link: http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=353525&CategoryId=14510

    The French government asked the Castro brothers’ regime to release its political prisoners and expressed concern for Fariñas’ well-being. Link: http://www.diariodecuba.net/cuba/81-cuba/621-paris-exige-la-liberacion-de-todos-los-presos-politicos-en-cuba.html

    Reporters Without Borders accused the Cuban government of being “pitiless” to dissident journalists, and demanded the “immediate release” of all journalists held prisoner on the communist-ruled island. Also said it was “especially concerned” about the state of health of dissident reporter Guillermo “Coco” Fariñas, who has been on a hunger strike for the last eight days. Link: http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=353291&CategoryId=14510

    The President of Costa Rica Oscar Arias said “Political prisoners do not exist in democracies. No one goes to prison for thinking differently in any country that is truly free. Cuba can put forth all its efforts and oratory to try to sell that its democracy is special, but with each political prisoner comes a de facto negation of that affirmation. Each political prisoner is irrefutable proof of authoritarianism.” . Link: http://es.noticias.yahoo.com/9/20100310/twl-entre-fuertes-criticas-a-cuba-arias-e1e34ad.html

    Former Polish president and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Lech Walesa, reminded Fariñas that Cuba needs men like him to live, to continue to lead the struggle for liberty. Link: http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/news/wreath_7483310

    Chile’s President-elect Sebastián Piñera issued a statement harshly condemning the circumstances surrounding the death of Zapata, who he said “gave his life to defend democracy and freedom in Cuba.” Link: http://www.ipsnews.net/news.asp?idnews=50537

    Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said: “The United States government deeply regrets the death of Orlando Zapata Tamayo and we send our condolences to his family and we also reiterate our strong objection to the actions of the Cuban government,” Link: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/02/25/AR2010022502528.html

    Spanish Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero reacted to the death of a Cuban political prisoner on hunger strike by demanding that the island’s communist government release its prisoners of conscience and respect human rights. Link: http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=352886&CategoryId=14510

  9. Mr.Pineiro:
    Regarding your last posting, congratulations. Finally you answer like a human. Looks like the Robotic machine was resting. My friend, you still have an space to keep expressing yourself here. At least, you have access to the internet without a “peluca” (wig) like Yoanis. You see, you are still have an advantage because you have freedom……as an elemental right.

  10. “His e-mail address is the same in all messages under different names.”

    I know that this is a lie. I have posted under the same name and same e-mail address every single time I’ve posted here. I find it hard to believe that anyone else is posting with my e-mail address.

    I find it hilarious that Generation Y now has its own “Propaganda Wing” which peddles lies and tries to minimize opposing viewpoints, the very thing they accuse the Cuban Revolution of doing. Hahahaha.

  11. When you read entries like this, you no longer have to wonder who are you dealing with. They are inhuman, heartless people, incapable of respecting human rights. There are foolish people in this blog who think they can negotiate with barbarians.
    Recently we have been bombarded with comments from defenders of the Robolution, disguising themselves under different names like: piñeiro-losada, tom, juan, cubano havana cuba, le suisse, pedro animala; when in essence it is the same person. His e-mail address is the same in all messages under different names.
    Down with Communist & Communism.
    Viva Cuba Libre, Long Live this United States of America.

  12. Mr. Pineiro:

    Almost got a headache trying to understand what are you’re trying to justify here .I believe that” The Capital” from Marx and Engels gave me less difficulties. Cuba is not a Socialist country, it is a a “Fidelist” regime.He is still controlling everything and everybody. Again, don’t be concern about the headache that a person could have when the system is dying of cancer. My friend, you are a “disco rayado”, a political blind person. Still, you cannot answer to the absence of the most elemental (again elemental)absence of freedom in Cuba. What you call revolution is not longer progressive, is not longer interested in the development of the future of Cuba. They have lost all initiative and they have not fulfill the promises. The dictatorship is only interested in keeping the status-quo. Again, the NEW Revolution, the one that I emphasize here, its the one that have the historical momentum. Ah, you could be a little bit more human and recognize and respect the simple and humble people that in Cuba are in jail, sick and dying for their ideas, with honor and dignity. Personally, you just care in the apparent economic explanation of the “balseros” phenomenon, without showing a little of compassion for the death, for the mothers and orphans. Again, my friend, no trates de tapar el sol con un dedo. Your speech is only words, no feelings, no sense of belonging to a country, to a pueblo. Don’t you think the day Orientales can travel freely to Habana they will have and feel more freedom? See, this is what I mean basic, elemental right. Keep copying the same old recipes and phrases my friend. Still, they are empty. Vivan lon nuevos y valientes revolucionarios en Cuba!!!! By the way, you also love Chavez??? I wonder…..

  13. Free World condemnation of Orlando Zapata death and demand the release of political prisoners.

    The tragic death of Orlando Zapata and the hunger strike by Guillermo Fariñas have not been in vain.

    The Castro brothers’ regime has been pressured by foreign governments, world leaders, foreign press, and world organizations with their demands that political prisoners be released from prison and their regrets for the death of Orlando Zapata Tamayo a Cuban political prisoner on hunger strike.

    The EU Parliament condemned the death of Cuban political prisoner Orlando Zapata Tamayo and demanded that Havana immediately release all its political prisoners. Link: http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=353525&CategoryId=14510
    The French government asked the Castro brothers’ regime to release its political prisoners and expressed concern for Fariñas’ well-being. Link: http://www.diariodecuba.net/cuba/81-cuba/621-paris-exige-la-liberacion-de-todos-los-presos-politicos-en-cuba.html

    Reporters Without Borders accused the Cuban government of being “pitiless” to dissident journalists, and demanded the “immediate release” of all journalists held prisoner on the communist-ruled island. Also said it was “especially concerned” about the state of health of dissident reporter Guillermo “Coco” Fariñas, who has been on a hunger strike for the last eight days. Link: http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=353291&CategoryId=14510

    The President of Costa Rica Oscar Arias said “Political prisoners do not exist in democracies. No one goes to prison for thinking differently in any country that is truly free. Cuba can put forth all its efforts and oratory to try to sell that its democracy is special, but with each political prisoner comes a de facto negation of that affirmation. Each political prisoner is irrefutable proof of authoritarianism.” . Link: http://es.noticias.yahoo.com/9/20100310/twl-entre-fuertes-criticas-a-cuba-arias-e1e34ad.html

    Former Polish president and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Lech Walesa, reminded Fariñas that Cuba needs men like him to live, to continue to lead the struggle for liberty. Link: http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/news/wreath_7483310

    Chile’s President-elect Sebastián Piñera issued a statement harshly condemning the circumstances surrounding the death of Zapata, who he said “gave his life to defend democracy and freedom in Cuba.” Link: http://www.ipsnews.net/news.asp?idnews=50537
    Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said: “The United States government deeply regrets the death of Orlando Zapata Tamayo and we send our condolences to his family and we also reiterate our strong objection to the actions of the Cuban government,” Link: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/02/25/AR2010022502528.html

    Spanish Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero reacted to the death of a Cuban political prisoner on hunger strike by demanding that the island’s communist government release its prisoners of conscience and respect human rights. Link: http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=352886&CategoryId=14510
    Europe – Cuba NGO Network calls for the release of all prisoners of conscience, particularly those in critical health conditions. Link: http://www.cubalog.eu/index.php?id=2&news=95

    Amnesty International has urged Cuba to release all political prisoners after the death of detained activist Orlando Zapata Tamayo who had been on hunger strike. Link: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/8534746.stm

    El Pais.com.es http://www.elpais.com/articulo/internacional/cubano/Farinas/recupera/consciencia/elpepuint/20100312elpepuint_1/Tes

    Canada.com http://www.canada.com/news/Cuban+hunger+striker+hospitalized+critical+condition/2672374/story.html

    Chicago Tribune http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/sns-ap-cb-cuba-hunger-striker,0,7538280.story

    The Miami Herald http://www.miamiherald.com/2010/03/11/1523465/cuban-dissident-felix-bonne-carcasses.html

    RADIO NETHERLANDS WORLDWIDE http://www.rnw.nl/africa/article/die-cuba-live

    USA TODAY http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2010-03-08-cuba-protest_N.htm?csp=34&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+UsatodaycomWorld-TopStories+(News+-+World+-+Top+Stories)

    TODAY msnbc.com http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/35837268/ns/health/

    THE HUFFINGTON POST http://www.huffingtonpost.com/huff-wires/20100312/cb-cuba-hunger-striker/

    Townhall.com http://townhall.com/news/world/2010/03/12/cuban_hunger_striker_in_hospital_after_passing_out?page=full&comments=true

    World Opinion Joins to Mourn, and Save, the Lives of Cuba’s Hunger Strikers

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/yoani-sanchez/world-opinion-joins-to-mo_b_498742.html

  14. Humberto: I will note, again, that for all the shouting you do in these comments, you have very little to say when it comes to actual discussion. I don’t think you are capable of discussing the issues because you fear a logical, reasonable discussion about Cuba.

    Frank: I don’t need to convince myself; I’m quite comfortable and confident with the views that I hold. As for your so-called “new revolutionaries” in Cuba, give me a break. First, everyone said that Socialist Cuba only existed because of Fidel. Well, now Fidel has stepped down and Socialist Cuba still exists. So, now all the anti-socialist partisans are scrambling to come up with something new to say and they are banking on the blogueros. Unfortunately, the blogueros largely prove that there IS freedom of expression in Cuba, there IS internet access in Cuba and Cubans are definitely part of the internet information revolution that is happening all over the world. The more you post your opinions from Cuba, the more you prove your own point wrong.

    Additionally, you are free to speak your opinions in Cuba. But, we know what happens when someone speaks out in favor of overthrowing socialism in Cuba, don’t we? Hundreds … or thousands … more people pour into the streets in favor of Fidel, in favor of Raul and in favor of the Cuban socialist revolution. These people are equally entitled to speak their mind. And, the fact is, time and time again, it is shown that there are vastly more Cubans who support socialist Cuba than those who oppose it.

    We can see that here when Reinaldo Escobar came out to voice his opinion. He wasn’t arrested. He wasn’t beaten. He wasn’t harmed in any way. But hundreds of Cubans came out to voice THEIR opinion: “Cuba si! Cuba si! Fidel! Fidel!” You can watch it here, if you haven’t seen it:

    This is a public exchange of ideas about Cuba on video for everyone to see. That is freedom of expression in action.

    However, what a Cuban citizen is NOT allowed to do (nor can a US citizen do this) is conspire with a foreign government to destabilize or harm the integrity of the national sovereignty. And, for 50+ years, the world’s largest super-power and cocaine-funded Miami terrorist networks have relentlessly worked with people in Cuba to violate the integrity of the national sovereignty, to maim or kill innocent tourists, to sabotage food production and to attempt assassinations against key government officials. In the United States, the punishment for such crimes is death. In Cuba, the punishment is less severe but there are still consequences, and that’s no different than any other country on earth.

    You ask about the balseros. In the capitalist world, there is always a phenomenon of people from “third world countries” attempting to enter the rich countries. It is the simple mathematics of the international currency exchange. If people can work and make dollars or euros, then they will try to do that. It is not an indictment of Cuba that this happens because it happens all over the world. There are people who try to enter the EU from nearby third-world countries, whether they are capitalist or communist or whatever they are. It is the unfortunate barbarism of international capitalism that an hour of a worker’s labor is worth more in the United States than that same hour doing the same work in either Mexico or Cuba.

    So, the fact that people try to enter the US from Cuba because Cuba is supposedly an “unbearable tyranny” is a hopelessly flawed argument that simply does not stand up to logical examination. If anything, it is evidence of the cruelty of capitalism.

    You ask about food shortages and, certainly, the US embargo contributes to this problem enormously. Cuba is leaving literally billions of dollars every year on the table by not being able to market tourism to such a nearby consumer market. Those billions of dollars would solve nearly all of Cuba’s economic problems in the FIRST YEAR alone. And that is exactly why the blockade is not lifted.

    Now, is the blockade the ONLY reason for food shortages? No, of course not. There are also the basic economics of the world and the fact that Cuba is a “third world country” and, as such, suffers the same problems as all third world countries do. However, BECAUSE of Cuba’s socialist programs, Cubans do much better than almost any other third world country. Keep in mind that 50,000-some people die every single day because of starvation in the global capitalist market. None of those people who die every single day of starvation are Cubans. And, that’s because Cuba’s government exists primarily to strive for socialism: a society where everyone has housing, food, clothing, health care, education and a meaningful, productive life available to them.

    You don’t need to go far from Cuba to find out what the capitalist third-world looks like. You can take Haiti, as an example, where there IS starvation, where armed street gangs of homeless children who grew up as orphans are ready to kill you for any amount of money they can get their hands on, where a privileged elite mercilessly steal all the resources and the jails are overflowing with political prisoners (those that were not massacred by capitalist death squads).

    I’m sorry, but I don’t find that your arguments stand up to basic logic and the most simple understanding of Latin American history.

    Time and time again, history has demonstrated for us that the “freedom” the US and anti-Castro Cubans envision for Latin America is one where corrupt oligarchies or outright military dictatorships keep the vast majority of people in gut-wrenching poverty while a small elite steal all the profits for all the resources and kill anyone who stands in their way. Like it or not, fair or unfair, that is EXACTLY the fate that awaits Cuba if the Cuban Revolution were ever to be overthrown. You can hope that it would be transformed into whatever paradise you believe a “democracy” is but there is no way that the “powers-that-be” in the Americas would let Cuba be anything else besides yet another slave plantation for their imperialist project.

    I challenge anyone reading this to disagree with logic or reason. I don’t believe that anyone will be able to do that.

    Viva la revolución cubana! Viva Fidel! Viva Raul! Viva Hugo Chávez! Cuba no esta sola!

  15. IF were to follow castro co. lead & practices … from when they took over Cuba:
    the question will be: “you are w/us or against us”
    W/us you’ll follow & obey
    Against us you’ll be aprehended & executed.
    That simple … please remind me: who voted the castro company inc. into office ?
    Who nominated them for liberators let alone appointed them ?

  16. So I understand this … Cuba “exports humanitarial aid” like medical personnel etc.
    Under that umbrella, an individual say … expert in repression … sorry “security”
    like Ramiro Valdez would be fine, an engineer to help w/the electrical power of Venezuela.
    Never mind, that he worked under the “legal” terms of the revolution directed by dr guevara in la cabana.
    “Due process to every prisioner … after execution … thirsty for blood like his boss”.
    Never mind he was the co-founder of the represive system even while “fighting for the freedom of Cuba.
    Now, he represents Cuba’s interests in Venezuela … helping “elect & keep chavez in power … interventionism .. nooo “humanitarian help”
    Another esbirro, angling for power after the old fidel dies.

  17. Hey … barbaroja is back from the dead!
    I guess his spirit got tired of traveling from place to place from Nicaragua, El Salvador, Guatemala, Colombia, Granada, Panama, Peru, Uruguay & other places back to hell.
    Perhaps floating in Varadero, next to the drugs which “never” run from Cuba w/the support of fidel.
    Perhaps playing “loose” w/Wolf, or perhaps got tired of playing w/guevara.
    Never mind barbaroja’s betrayal, of guevara … just doing his job.
    So losada how is it hanging?
    After all this years, while your jefe (since you were his esbirro) cries & cries against interventionism … but, you didn’t do anything (in any country) to ilegally undermine an established goverment, nor (perish the thought) you facilitated any “armed’ incursions into any country say like … Bolivia or Argentina … right?
    Quick to point your accusing index finger yet forgetting the other three (in your Hand) pointing at you …

  18. Mr Pineiro:
    Still repeating the same “cantaleta”. Looks like you need to convince yourself about all the same old same old. From which book did you copy all that? Even if all your arguments were 100% true, still don’t justify the facts and daily violation of the most elemental rights in Cuba. Why people from Oriente can live in Habana? Why Cubans can travel without “la carta Blanca”?, why Cubans don’t have access to the internet? Why Cubans cant organize and meet in other organizations besides the CDR or PCC?You mention the Mexicans crossing the border, what about our balseros? How many have died?Mira, no trates de tapar el sol con un dedo. Again, the fact that you agree with the so call “Revolucion Cubana’ don’t give any right to ignore what’s going on in our Island.The fact that in Cuba you cant find huevos, carne, verduras, frutas is not because of the colonial or imperialistic domination. It is because, between another causes, the arrogance of the agricultural dirigentes, the absence of stimulus to the independent farmers,the total abandon of the socialize agriculture, and the policy of waiting for the support of “others” (lease la antigua Union Sovietica)Remember, the new revlucionarios in Cuba are asking for elemental rights, the more basic, primary rights .You don’t have to go back to the same thing that the old dictators have been saying for 50 years.You could foul some people 50 years ago, but not now. My friend, you can wish the best to all the dictators in the world; it is your right.But at least respect the common sense of the new revolucionarios in Cuba, don’t insult their’s or our intellect.They are in history the same as that lonely and disarm Chinese that stud in front of the tanks and stop them, they are like the mambises, that went to fight against guns with machetes.Have some decency , my friend ,and look around. Maybe you could see and think better…Viva la NUEVA revolucion cubana!!!

  19. If the present regime is so right for cubans, what would the opinion of a few dissidents be so dangerous?
    If the present regime is so right fot the people of Cuba, why not have a free referendum under UN monitoring for legitimacy purposes, as to weather or not public support is behind the present regime?
    If the present regime is so right for Cuba why not have free elections after said referendum, under UN monitoring for legitimacy purposes?
    Transparecy is as transparency shows right?

  20. all the name calling, the “upmanship does not change the reality of a Cuba ruled not by law but by thugs who “write laws”.
    The land of Marti eh? where all opinions are respected, where unity is. where black & white & any group act as one for the benefit of Cuba …
    Usa, China anyone … when it comes down to it, Cuba is not that important, not even for more that a minute in the eve. news …
    Cuba is importran for cubans, for the brave who survives, for the one who is willing to die for his/her convictions.
    Not for a “political” possition, not for an egotistical personal gain … for cubans. for Cuba.
    While “the abusers” call othe people names, while the insults fly … come back to reality … at this point & time what matters is CUBA!

  21. The Castro brothers’ regime calls dissidents “mercenaries” hired by the U.S. Government. Guillermo Fariñas, in his interview with Infobae.com, shrewdly remarks that mercenary are not known for dying for their ideas, he said, “No mercenary (as classified by the Castroite regime) dies for his ideas, mercenaries die for money.”

    A mercenary is a professional soldier hired by a foreign army. A mercenary is essentially motivated by money. The Cubans dissidents are not professional soldiers of any foreign country, nor are they motivated by money. They are motivated by their ideals and patriotism.

  22. Hola Yoanni,
    Yo soy gringo de 57 anos de edad. Espera! No busco cita ciber-romantica. Solo te digo esto por dar te de entender que yo he tenido bastante tiempo en el planeta nuestro y siempre he puesto mucha attencion a la politica en todas partes, pero especialmente la de Cuba.
    Es porque soy comunista. Si. Aqui hay “disidentes” tambien. Yo habia planeado un viaje a Cuba en 1982 pero lamentablemente tuvo que cancelarlo porque el entonces Presidente Reagan hizo una orden ejecutivo (un decreto en otras palabras, no salio del congreso) prohibiendo tales visitas sin licencia, y las liciencias eran solamente para periodistas, becarios, etc.
    Pero me fui a Nicaragua donde era guerra sucio hecho por mercenarios pagados por Reagan con el dinero de los impuestos recogidos de la gente como yo y todo trabajador. El pueblo aqui no queria guerra. El congreso hizo una ley prohibiendo gastos de fondos EEUU por “los contras’ de Nicaragua. Sin respeto para le ley Reagan, en secreto, vendio misiles a Iran (que estaba en guerra con Iraq) y dio el dinero a los contras. Eso fue el “escandolo Iran-Contra.”
    Perdoname por aburrir te con “historia antigua.” Es solo porque quiero decirte que el gobierno EEUU, que me parece tu piensas como tu amigo, no es como se pone a aparecer.
    En Nicaragua, y en otras partes, yo conocia cubanos muy revolucionarios, que no aprovecharon de bastante oportunidades de “defect” (desertar) de la revolucion.
    Seguro, Cuba necesita cambios (como mi pais, mas que todos). Pero, creo yo que los unicos cambios que la mayoria de cubanos apoyaran seran hechos sin la “ayuda” de EEUU. Creo yo, si los “disidentes” pueden demostrar independencia del USIS seran mejor recibidos. Como alguien que ha visto condiciones in varias paises latinoamericanos yo creo que ustedes “los disidentes” deben aceptar las ganancias de la revolucion como fundacion en que construir mas.
    Bueno, Yoanni, si lees esto, espero que me respondes, como “un disidente a otro.”

  23. This is such a PATHETIC line.

    “A further 11 percent of production reportedly has been lost due to a lack of sugar cane.”

    THEY DONT HAVE ENOUGH SUGAR CANE! IN CUBA!!! SO IRONIC AND SAD!

  24. THE CUBAN PEOPLE HAVE BEEN AND COULD BE AGAIN ONE OF THE MOST ENTREPENEURIAL AND SUCCESSFUL PEOPLE IN THE WORLD ONCE “LA CHINA” & “THE MUMMY” GET “BOOTED” OUT!

    “The European Union recently dispatched anthropologists to study racism in Cuba. Their findings were shocking: Not only was racism alive and well in the workers’ paradise, but it was systemic and institutional. Blacks were systematically excluded from positions that involved coming in contact with foreign tourists (where they could earn tips in hard currencies), they were relegated to poor housing, complained of the longest waits for healthcare, were excluded from managerial positions, received the lowest remittances from relatives abroad, and were five times more likely to be imprisoned. ”

    http://news.newamericamedia.org/news/view_article.html?article_id=7b4ef8e52790034e043a37d170243f0f

    BUSINESSWEEK: Cuba’s sugar industry hit by low productivity
    By PAUL HAVEN-Associated Press March 10, 2010

    BUSINESSWEEK: Cuba’s sugar industry hit by low productivity
    By PAUL HAVEN-Associated Press March 10, 2010

    “Production at Cuba’s sugar plants has been hit hard this year by inefficiency, a spate of breakdowns and other technical problems, state-media reported Wednesday, adding to sobering news for the Communist-run island’s crisis-addled economy.

    Breakdowns and other interruptions have idled plants nearly 19 percent of the time so far in 2010, the Communist Party newspaper Granma said. A further 11 percent of production reportedly has been lost due to a lack of sugar cane.

    The paper said problems were worst in the key sugar-growing region of Las Tunas, 360 miles (600 kilometers) east of the capital.

    It also blamed poor planning and “a lack of discipline.”

    http://www.businessweek.com/ap/financialnews/D9EBUNMG0.htm

  25. Humberto:

    It is incompetent to call Cuba an economic disaster.

    Cuba belongs in the class of countries which have suffered at the hands of colonial and imperialist policies. You can call them “third world countries” or “developing nations” or whatever you wish.

    The capitalist third world countries are disaster zones and that is exactly what anti-Castro Cubans want for Cuba.

    Every day, thousands of Mexicans risk their life to flee Capitalist Mexico in search of ways to make a dollar. In the meantime, political prisoners like those in Oaxaca and all over Mexico rot away in some of the worst prison conditions in the world. The same is true in Capitalist Haiti. The same is true throughout Capitalist regimes in Africa.

    In other words, Capitalist third world countries are plagued by non-stop warfare, lethal corruption, horrific prisons, and disgusting levels of poverty (especially when contrasted with the less than 1% of the Capitalist Dictatorships which control the resources and profits).

    In Communist Cuba, you do not see the same problems that you see in the Capitalist Regimes of the third world. There are not thousands of gang-related murders plaguing the streets of Havana. The Cuban government makes every effort to provide medicine, health care, food and opportunities to the people. Cuba encourages its people to participate in the political process through the CDRs and through education and by becoming a meaningful participant in the Cuban Revolution.

    In nearly every third world capitalist dictatorship, these rights are openly declared as unimportant, if they are referred to at all by anyone. In the capitalist third world regimes, you just take for granted that the poor are nothing more than slaves for whichever warlord gang happens to rule the “free market” at that time. I dare you to compare the situation in Cuba to ANY Capitalist Dictatorship in the Third World.

    And, furthermore, we see that those countries which are coming out of decades of suffering of Capitalist Dictatorships … Bolivia, Uruguay, Brazil, Venezuela, Ecuador, Nicaragua, and so on … all of these countries are reversing the disastrous effects of the Capitalist Dictatorships under the leadership of socialist parties and in co-operation with Communist Cuba.

    These are the facts, Humberto. I ask you, Humberto — would you prefer to spend 6 months in Communist Havana or 6 months in Capitalist Juarez, Mexico? Or Capitalist Nigeria? It is clear that any reasonable and honest human being would prefer to live in Communist Havana than any of the Capitalist Dictatorships of the Third World, because these areas are anarchistic war zones, where private armies of Chevron do battle with religious sects or simply capitalist gangs seeking control of areas that contain valuable resources.

    Communist Cuba is an example for the entire world of how to move into a future of peace and prosperity for ALL peoples, not just those with the most weapons or those who have inherited power/wealth from their blood-thirsty ancestors.

    Communist Cuba has created a peaceful society where Cubans enjoy the fundamental human rights that all human beings should have, to the best of their ability, while simultaneously fighting off the world’s only military superpower.

    Communist Cuba has again and again embarrassed the terrorist tendencies of the Miami-Cuban mafia by outsmarting and defeating the greatest military machine the world has ever known. People who are on the payroll of a foreign government and seek to overthrow or destabilize their own government are not considered “political prisoners” in Cuba or the United States or anywhere in the world — they are considered traitors, and in the United States, such criminals would be put to death.

    Cuba is working with Venezuela and Brazil and other countries to show the world that there IS another way … that the death and bloodshed and misery that you find in EVERY SINGLE Capitalist Regime on earth and especially the Third World Capitalist Regimes … that this way is not only wrong, but avoidable. Another world is possible and thanks to the courage of the Cuban people, the Venezuelan people, the Brazilian people, the Bolivian people, the world is slowly transforming.

    Humberto, consider yourself checked.

    Long live the Cuban Revolution!
    Viva Fidel! Viva Raul! Viva Che! Viva Hugo Chavez! Viva Evo Morales! Viva Lula da Silva and Dilma and the PT!

  26. cubano havana cuba — #47:

    Thank you very much for your gracious invitation to visit Cuba.

    What you fail to understand is that I am already there. Me and hundreds of thousands of others like me are already there, standing right next to you, watching and waiting. Enough with the invitations.

  27. “WE WILL NOT LET THE CAPITALISTS TURN CUBA INTO ANOTHER HAITI OR ANY OTHER OF THEIR SO-CALLED “FREE COUNTRIES” — WHERE 5-10 FAMILIES CONTROL ALL THE WEALTH AND RESOURCES AND THE PEOPLE MUST FIGHT EACH OTHER FOR THE SCRAPS.”

    Fighting For Scraps???????

    This is why most people who work in the tourist industry in Cuba are stealing the resorts “dry” of Rum and Coffee and selling this to the tourists to make ends meet or stealing meat and selling it on the black market to the Cuban people who are rationed this…or worse selling themselves to the tourists…Sad state of affairs Ol Fidel and Raul have made…..

  28. Puede Ser que El Gobierno de cUba Y Venezuela esten en su fin

    Fuerte Tiuna: Cónclave del Estamento Militar Revela la Gravedad de la Crisis Martes, 26 de Enero de 2010 20:34 Máximo Tomás – LNC
    Fuentes internas desde dentro de Venezuela reportan que durante todo el día de hoy y aún a estas horas se ha estado y está celebrando en Fuerte Tiuna un “cónclave” en el que participan los más importantes jefes del Alto Estamento militar venezolano. La convocación a esta junta de emergencia se produjo ante la profunda crisis que ha estallado en el seno del gobierno chavista, crisis provocada por una serie de demandas -consideradas inaceptables por los militares venezolanos- de parte de la Jefatura de la Misión Militar cubana en Venezuela. La Habana quiere imponer a Caracas una agenda bien estructurada de medidas destinadas a “garantizar y asegurar la estabilidad y permanencia del régimen bolivariano en el poder.
    Los raulistas no confían en la lealtad de los altos mandos venezolanos y buscan reemplazarlos paulatinamente con hombres que gocen del visto bueno de los generales-empresarios, el verdadero grupo de poder en la Isla caribeña.
    Una de las exigencias cubanas, considerada el “detonante” de la crisis, es la de que a cuatro coroneles cubanos estacionados en Venezuela, se les conceda de inmediato la nacionalidad venezolana y que los mismos sean promovidos al grado de generales de brigada y nombrados como jefes de unidades élites del ejército venezolano.

    Esta demanda fue recibida con fuerte oposición por parte del Coronel Ramón Carrizález, -un hombre de confianza bien cercano a Hugo Chávez-, ministro de Defensa de Venezuela y otros allegados a la cúpula del poder, entre los que se encuentran muchos altos jefes militares. La oposición de Carrizález a las demandas cubanas le ha llevado a renunciar a su cargo de Ministro de Defensa.

    La crisis, que apenas se inicia, puede desencadenar impoderables que pongan en peligro el control económico y estratégico que Cuba mantiene sobre Venezuela e incluso desembocar en la salida del poder de Hugo Chávez.

  29. Juan #64 Could you please explain to me what effect a blockade or travel ban to China by the United States has to do with the system of government of Cuba and why that system if either good or bad?

  30. Juan,

    You should know this! Its ABOUT THE MONEY!The USA owes China a ton of money because we borrowed from them all these years. In Cuba’s case is a good thing that we dont really need them because this allows the USA and other democratic countries to put pressure on “LA CHINA” & “THE MUMMY” for their crimes.

  31. So Humbug why doesn’t the USA place a blockade on China and ban its citizens from travelling to its current very best friend?

    Maybe forthe same reason Human Rights Watch, a strong critic of the Cuban government, issued a statement arguing “the proposed [repeal of the travel bans on USA citizens] legislation, as well as similar legislation in the United States Senate, represents a necessary step towards ending a U.S. policy that has failed for decades to have any impact whatsoever on improving human rights in Cuba.” According to HRW, “efforts by the U.S. government to press for change by imposing a sweeping ban on trade and travel have proven to be a costly and misguided failure.”

    http://cubacentral.wordpress.c…../#more-393

    #57 don’t ever expect anything other than vitriol and abuse – never rationla arguments even when Yoani writes things that contradict the prevailing nonsense spewed out her. They are totally uninterested in anything real Cubans write or say unless it conforms to the Mimai mafia’s straitjacketed views.

  32. Uhm, No.

    What is obvious to the entire world is that the murderous Cuban dictatorship jails hundreds of prisoners of conscience because it fears them.

    What is obvious to the entire world is that the murderous Cuban dictatorship is staffed by nothing more than a bunch of criminals.

    What is obvious to the entire world is that the murderous Cuban octogenarian dictatorship is finally coming face-to-face with the one thing it cannot control. The inevitable march of time.

    Down with the illegitimate Cuban revolution and down with the murderers who foisted it upon us.

  33. RIGHT BACK AT YOU! m. piñeiro losada! Not wasting my fingers on you, but I can post important news related to your accusations! People can rean and make up their own mind!

    THESE ARE THE TOP 4 COUNTRIES JAILING JOURNALISTS! RECOGNIZE A CARIBBEAN ISLAND? China: 24 Iran: 23 Cuba: 22 Eritrea: 19 This list includes 22 journalists jailed in Cuba with a brief story of their case.
    COMMITEE TO PROTECT JOURNALISTS (CPJ) finds jump in imprisonments At least 136 journalists all over the world are now in jail, a nine percent increase over 2008. CPJ’s census of imprisoned journalists shows that freelancers and online journalists are increasingly vulnerable.

    http://www.cpj.org/imprisoned/2009.php

    EU OBSERVER: MEPs attack Cuba over human rights abuses
    ANDREW WILLIS

    http://euobserver.com/9/29666

  34. This is Yoani’s blog and yet Wanker you call her and her husband ‘losers’ – how offensive!

  35. Why is that nit-wits who take the names of dead murderers continue to actively solicit attention on this blog? The biological solution will be here in short order and the ineffectual flailing we see from these pseudo logicians only serves to show how lost the cause really is. What we are witnessing are the death throws of a 50-year tragedy. Time is running out losers. Deal with it.

  36. #53 You write: “I don’t believe that Yoani wants this for her country.”
    And of course she doesn’t – she is a lot smarter than the Miami mafia and their ilk.
    That’s why she said in January
    “Obama and the country he represents can play a very important role in this opening of Cuba to democracy, but they must do so without interference with respect to our sovereignty and our decisions.”
    And some time before her husband Reinaldo Escobar said “We Cubans face a double threat in our citizen and collective security: one from the totalitarian arrogance of the Cuban government and another from the hegemonic arrogance of the United States.”

  37. Mr: Pineiro Losada:
    Beside your obvious admiration for what you call “Revolution”, I think you ‘re missing the point here. The author of this blog is asking for the most elemental right that you are exercising:freedom of expression. You could admire the whole Cuban process or the “results??? of it. However, your ideals or ideological stand can’t explain why Cuba is an economical disaster, a country where their own citizens are treated as a second class persons or why civilian can express or travel freely. Again, these are the most elemental rights that all of us enjoy. It is not about the mafia or the revolution, who is bad or who is good. It is about economical and political opportunities in a society that close the door to all the alternatives that do not include the old establishment. After more than half of century, nobody (even you) can’t argue the failure of the Revolution of 1959. We need a new Revolution, new ideas, new economics, new political institutions that are interested in the most important goal:how to improve the daily life of Cubans in Cuba. Please, stop the old game of blaming everybody,all the neighbors, but not the real causes and criminals that since 1959 install a totalitarian regime, stopping all possibilities of economical development.Lets put it this way: Don’t be to concern in how you will cure a headache in the future, while our country is dying of cancer.At least Yoani describe daily, painful reality. You only repeat, repeat, repeat phrases. Remember, the phenomenon that you celebrate is not longer a Revolution, is not longer a progressive event that benefit the Cuban people.It benefits just a few old generals , and “dirigentes”. I want to finish with the same phrase than you, but with an small change ! Viva la NUEVA Revolucion Cubana!!!

  38. Again, Humberto Capiro ignores the opportunity to respond to rational counter-arguments to his inane rants. Why isn’t this anti-Castroite interested in dialogue? What scares Humberto about actually discussing the issues here?

    Viva la revolución cubana! Viva Fidel!

  39. The Castro brothers are a mafia of Communist oppressors who has ruled with an iron hand for 51 years, denying the Cuban citizens the most basic freedoms. They tell you where you will work, how much you will be paid, what and how much you will eat, what you can and cannot say. The regime will provide the same treatment to Fariñas which they gave Orlando Zapata Tamayo, and then blame it on the US.

  40. WHY ARE THE MAJORITY OF DISSIDENTS IN CUBA BLACK OR MULATO (bi-racial)?

    ‘Obama Effect’ Highlights Racism in Cuba

    New America Media, News Analysis, Louis E.V. Nevaer, Posted: Dec 15, 2008

    “The European Union recently dispatched anthropologists to study racism in Cuba. Their findings were shocking: Not only was racism alive and well in the workers’ paradise, but it was systemic and institutional. Blacks were systematically excluded from positions that involved coming in contact with foreign tourists (where they could earn tips in hard currencies), they were relegated to poor housing, complained of the longest waits for healthcare, were excluded from managerial positions, received the lowest remittances from relatives abroad, and were five times more likely to be imprisoned. ”

    http://news.newamericamedia.org/news/view_article.html?article_id=7b4ef8e52790034e043a37d170243f0f

    Desidia médica en Holguín Texto: Luis Felipe Rojas R. /Fotos: Caridad Caballero Batista.-Marzo 14, 2010 por Luis Felipe Rojas

    http://cruzarlasalambradas.wordpress.com/2010/03/14/desidia-medica-en-holguin-texto-luis-felipe-rojas-r-fotos-caridad-caballero-batista/?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

  41. CAN YOU IMAGINE WHAT CUBA CULD HAVE BEEN IN 2010 WITHOUT “LA CHINA” & “THE MUMMY” AND THEIR FACIST REGIME?

    Socio-Economic Conditions in Pre-Castro Cuba*

    Introduction
    In the 1950′s Cuba was, socially and economically, a relatively advanced country, certainly by Latin American standards and, in some areas, by world standards.
    Cuba’s infant mortality rate was the best in Latin America — and the 13th lowest in the world.
    Cuba also had an excellent educational system and impressive literacy rates in the 1950′s.
    Pre-Castro Cuba ranked third in Latin America in per capita food consumption.
    Cuba ranked first in Latin America and fifth in the world in television sets per capita.
    Pre-Castro Cuba had 58 daily newspapers of differing political hues and ranked eighth in the world in number of radio stations.

    http://ctp.iccas.miami.edu/FACTS_Web/Cuba%20Facts%20Issue%2043%20December.htm

    fas·cism-(sometimes initial capital letter) a governmental system led by a dictator having complete power, forcibly suppressing opposition and criticism, regimenting all industry, commerce, etc., and emphasizing an aggressive nationalism and often racism.

    dic·ta·tor·ship-1. a country, government, or the form of government in which absolute power is exercised by a dictator. 2. absolute, imperious, or overbearing power or control. 3. the office or position held by a dictator.

  42. The reason that the Miami-Cuban mafia don’t want to ever talk about the United States is the same strategy that the US itself uses. No US politician will ever talk about Alpha 66, or the F-4 Commandos, or Orlando Bosch.

    Amazingly, commenters like Humberto Capiro assert that US-funded anti-Castro terrorist groups who openly brag on their websites about commando raids targeting civilians in Cuba have nothing to do with Cuba or its policies. This is the equivalent of saying that September 11th and Al-Qaeda have nothing to do with the United States’ policies.

    It is absurd anti-logic and they can only respond with lunatic posts in all capital letters, trying to shout down anyone who exposes them with reason and logic.

    As for Yoani, she appears to still be searching for what she believes and it seems to me that she’s at a stage where she has received so much support from the Cuban-American mafioso that she can only ignore, for the moment, the logic that crushes their position. It is obvious to the entire world that the Cuban-American mafia are thugs, who wish that Cuba end up like Haiti or Latin American countries of the previous century, where a few rich Cuban families collaborate against their own people with multinational corporations. The end result has been demonstrated over and over and over again in Latin American countries throughout history: a tiny percentage of the population (less than 1%) controls over 90% of the wealth and those who are not part of the elite must fight for the scraps.

    I don’t believe that Yoani wants this for her country. Who WOULD want this for their country, except for the selfish few elite who would benefit from such an arrangement?

    This tiny elite lives in Miami and they expose themselves for what they really are at every step: violent thugs who bomb civilians, strafe Cuba from the coast with machine guns and pay hundreds of thousands of dollars trying to be the ones who will become the capitalist elite in a post-Communist Cuba. Unfortunately, the resolve of the Cuban people and, within the last 30 years, with the defeat of right-wing oligarchy capitalism in Latin America, people from all over Latin America are defeating them.

    Viva la revolución cubana!

  43. MIAMI HERALD: Unconscionable imprisonment
    BY ALINA FERNANDEZ REVUELTA- alinacubalibre@bellsouth.net
    Some days ago, the official daily Granma argued why the Cuban authorities should allow the death of Cuban dissident Guillermo Fariñas, who’s on a hunger strike to push the regime to free two dozen imprisoned dissidents said to be critically ill.

    The island’s iron-fisted government does not think it proper to force-feed him. “There are bioethical principles that obligate the physician to respect the decision of a person who has decided to initiate a hunger strike,” it said. As always, the regime lashed out at the United States, remarking that it is the American authorities who violate the rights of hunger strikers held in the prisons in Guantánamo, Abu Ghraib and Bagram when they force them to ingest food.

    They forget one detail. To begin with, Guillermo Fariñas is not in prison and he’s exercising his right to strike from his own home.

    The Granma journalist fails to mention that Fariñas is doing that in homage to Orlando Zapata Tamayo, who took 83 days to die because he was demanding prison conditions proper for his status as a human being.

    These are not conditions that we in the free world consider standard treatment — even for prisoners deprived of freedom. No, no. According to Omar Pernet, a former fellow inmate at the Gunajay Prison, one of the “treatments” he and Orlando suffered was to walk down a corridor from their cell to another section of the prison.

    Along the entire corridor stood 14 soldiers, who punched the inmates on the head, the stomach, the legs and the back as they walked. Blows from everywhere, struck by 14 pairs of arms holding weapons. Systematic beatings, a daily torture made more odious and vicious by the fact that the inmates expected them every day.

    A torture foretold. In the hands of your own compatriots, in defense of whose freedom and rights you are there, imprisoned. It is hard to imagine, but it is one of the usual practices in Cuba’s ideological prisons.

    To say the least, there is a basic difference between Cuba and many other countries and it is that on the island nothing protects the individual against the State. No institution defends a human being against the political machine that could crush it at any moment. A civil lawyer is an obeisant scribe who almost always is more scared than the detainee.

    That is why it is all the more surprising that the Cuban authorities know and handle the American judicial system to perfection, in all instances. That is demonstrated by the legal war they waged in a Florida courtroom (and won) in the case of Elián Gonzalez. The photographs of the child, terrified by the police forces around him, were seen worldwide.

    The five spies who went to prison after the 14 original Wasp Network arrests have used up all legal recourses and their case has reached the Supreme Court. Should the court accept the five Cubans’ plea, it would be the first time in decades that the Supreme Court accepts a case involving the parameters that should be followed to decide a change of venue in criminal cases.

    The Cuban regime’s knowledge of working the U.S. legal system is not limited to civil or federal cases, because it also extends to the financial-legal system. How much did the Swiss bank UBS pay as punishment for rerouting more than $3 billion to the island? A $100 million fine.

    Cuba, which deals in minute detail with U.S. law and defends with ferocity its spies, the boy rafter, and its own multimillion-dollar fortune, justifies itself frivolously when it concedes to its people the right to starve themselves to death.

    But isn’t this the way we Cubans have lived for more than half a century?

    God willing, the voices of Orlando Zapata Tamayo, Guillermo Fariñas and now Félix Bonne will weigh on the collective consciousness of the regime’s accomplices as a recurrent nightmare.

    Alina Fernández Revuelta is the author of Castro’s Daughter: an Exile’s Memoir of Cuba and radio talk show host at 9 p.m. Monday-Friday on 1140-AM.

    http://www.miamiherald.com/2010/03/14/1527552/unconscionable-imprisonment.html

  44. GREAT ARTICLE ON THE MIAMI HERALD ABOUT “LITTLE HAVANA”! CAN YOU IMAGINE WHAT “BIG HAVANA” COULD BE AFTER THERE IS FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION AND BUSINESSES? ENOUGH “MIAMI BASHING” FROM THESE “RATS” OF “LA CHINA” & “THE MUMMY’! Most of the Cubans in the USA I know have no interest in getting their homes, properties etc (if they ever had them). They just want JUSTICE for OUR PEOPLE and be able to restore THE BEAUTY that is HAVANA as well as all the other cities and towns WE ALL LEFT BEHIND. These “RATS” keep trying to DIVIDE US and SPREAD LIES about how THE CUBAN PEOPLE REALLY FEEL! I hope those who read this blog take time to read ALL ARTICLES and make up THEIR OWN MIND!

    MIAMI HERALD: Little Havana home to art, music and Cuban nostalgia. Yes, it has today’s street fair, but also art films, poetry readings, the Pepto Bismol House and music evoking a Cuba loved and lost.
    BY FABIOLA SANTIAGO-fsantiago@MiamiHerald.com
    On Sunday, hundreds of thousands of people are expected to pack the heart of historic Little Havana — colorful Calle Ocho — for an annual festival of music, food and culture that has become the largest celebration of its kind in the United States.

    Yet the 25-year effort to turn the domino-clacking, rooster-roaming enclave into a cultural destination year-round is a dream only partly realized. The parties, the daily busloads of tourists cruising by art galleries and domino park and the official “Latin Quarter” designation by the city of Miami in 1984 — to conjure a New Orleans-like flair and keep new architecture Spanish-style — have yet to bring the sustained vitality that residents and business people want.

    THE SIGHTS AND SOUNDS

    As the sun descends in a spectacle of pink and purple, art vendors set up easels and tables along a placita off Calle Ocho flanked by the Tower and Domino Park. The vendors’ colorful artwork and decorative wares — painted demitasse sets, cigar boxes, refrigerator magnets — evoke a lost Cuba of palm-studded serenity, fighting cocks and rumba dancers.

    At a nearby corner, men carrying drums and claves, rhythm-marking sticks, break into an impromptu jam session. The aroma of garlicky sofrito, the base of Cuban cuisine, hangs in the air. Passersby swing their hips, shimmy through a few notes and move on as if the night were one long conga line.

    “This is ground zero for Little Havana,” says historian Paul George as he begins a walking tour of the area. George, who grew up here, lives in a 1921 Dade County pine-and-stucco bungalow his parents owned for three decades.

    READ FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING LINK!

    http://www.miamiherald.com/2010/03/13/1528519/yes-it-has-todays-street-fair.html

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