My Kingdom for a Banana


They say that when the wall fell and the two Germanys united, people coming from the east had never eaten a banana. They looked ecstatically at the long fruit that the disrupted markets of East Germany hadn’t sold in all the years of the centrally planned economy. I imagine that trying the sweet mass of a banana had to be like tasting the end of a system that lasted fifty years. Between these two “flavors” I would prefer experiencing the second because the other has been on my table since I was little.

The banana was—next to the orange—one of the basic fruits in our house, long before the Germans knew of its existence. We Cubans don’t have a wall to knock down by biting its upright consistency, but we owe it to the banana that our nourishment in the nineties wasn’t more frugal. “Fufu,” made with plantains mashed with pork rinds, was for weeks the only food for my adolescent body. As a beneficiary of its virtues I’d like to erect a monument, although to do so we’d have to import an example from Costa Rica to use as model for the much-deserved statue.

I haven’t seen a banana since last September when hurricanes ravaged the plantations. I refuse to believe that after having survived the disastrous agricultural plans and the unfortunate genetic crossings, we are going to lose it now. This fruit, which managed to overcome the experiments of the Great Farmer in Chief, can’t be allowed to die at the hands of a couple of cyclones. I fear that we—like the people of Berlin in 1989—are on the verge of running anxiously after the taste of banana.

Advertisements

43 thoughts on “My Kingdom for a Banana

  1. Thank you for your posts. I have relatives that are from Cuba and know that much has changed in the past few years. Thank you for doing this! It is a sign that you want more, better, and change. I have seen this change happen and continue to happen. Please never give up any of your dreams for your life and the others that live in the same state that you do. “Change is not made without inconvenience, even from worse to better.” Hooker, Richard. You are one voice that will make the change and you will be joined by the many that believe what you say. Ask for help in very specific terms and I will write to all that are in power to help you with whatever you deem worthy in your shoes. As an American I can only ask of them what you ask of me as I have not lived the way you do. I believe in change for the betterment of community and humanity. Call on me and I will fight your fight to the best of my ability. God Bless!

  2. I live in the U.S.A.,i hope things will be better for your people soon! Good luck!

  3. Hurricane Flora happened in 1963 Its 2009 and far less people died yet again the Communist party of Cuba does not control the weather in 1963 the revolution was very new and one could not expect much change yet by the way Cuba offered to send 1500 doctors to New Orleans after the hurricane and the Bush dictatorship rejected their offer. I fail to see what im supposed to be shocked by you make little sense u even posted the same exact message three times. By the way are you even from Cuba wheres your name from it sounds Mongolian

  4. Bryce wrote:
    “By the way the fact that the death toll dropped from over 1000 in the 60s to 7 seems like a positive example of the success of the revolution may the number reach 0 this season and may America learn from the team spirit and human capital of its southern neighbor.”

    You miss the boat again. The death tall didn’t drop, on the contrary it jump 2000% in a period of 41 years, from 100 in 1963 to 2,000 in 2004. It took that long to the Castros regime to account for the death toll.

    “How many years must pass to really know the material losses and loss of human lives caused by the other hurricanes?”

    Learn what, to manipulating and hide the information, like in the death toll caused by Hurricane Flora? Give me a break!

  5. By the way the fact that the death toll dropped from over 1000 in the 60s to 7 seems like a positive example of the success of the revolution may the number reach 0 this season and may America learn from the team spirit and human capital of its southern neighbor. Yet again and I can’t stress this enough Fidel or the Communist Party is not controlling the weather. The CIA tried that all ready doesn’t work. You guys probably think Fidel ate your homework

  6. Only 1 of your links works by the way and I fail to see how Fidel acknowledging the error of the emergency system is a crime we needed that kind of honesty and self criticism in our government

  7. Well some people refuse to leave their homes but in the face of such disaster 7 lives lost is tragic but low. I<s hardly a case for Cuba being an oppressive diectatorship how will private banks casinos and whorehouses which was what was happening under Batista help out with hurricanes

  8. Bryce wrote:
    So you are blaming Fidel Castro for hurricanes. That is ridiculous. For people who hate Fidel so much you sure have a lot of faith in his power, hes not god he doesn’t create hurricanes.

    You didn’t bother to read the article, nor to provided any statistics and references as was suggested in the previous comment # 33; just keep in given your unsubstantiated opinion. I saw, I saw… there cannot be a worse blind person that the one that is refusing to see! The facts, Bryce, the facts.

    Excerpt from “Castro’s Tyranny And The Hurricanes”:

    So far there have been reported 7 deaths caused by Hurricane Ike. The official newspaper Granma reported that “the loss of seven lives … not only were the direct result of the effects of Ike, but the lack of strict enforcement of the measures oriented by the system of Civil Defense.” The cynicism of the tyranny knows no bounds in attributing the occurrence of the deaths were due to the irresponsibility of the victims.

    Link: http://www.lanuevacuba.com/archivo/humberto-corzo-8.htm

  9. So you are blaming Fidel Castro for hurricanes. That is ridiculous. For people who hate Fidel so much you sure have a lot of faith in his power, hes not god he doesn’t create hurricanes. The hurricanes that happened in the 60s were so soon after the revolution that one could hardly expect the new government to be able to respond as well as they can now. I think what is amazing is how well the Cuban people as a whole can respond to these tragic and unavoidable events in the present. Nothing you say refutes the horrible realities of life in the capitalist individualistic “democracy” of the United States. And I know this from personal experience. I saw the devastation of New Orleans and I saw the racism where insurance companies found loopholes to avoid helping people rebuild their homes. I saw apathetic recovery efforts that allowed houses of black homeowners to rot to the point where they were condemmed and bulldozed, their right to private property trampled. And I saw how the demographics of New Orleans and the voting population become wealthier and more white. There is even talk of Donald Trump building a resort on the ruins of the Lower 9th Ward. This is all largely a result of the failure to reinforce the levies which engineers and scientists had been telling an apathetic White House for 30 years. What is impressive is how the Cuban people were able to come together so quickly to evacuate and rescue people. Most of those killed by the hurricane in New Orleans where peope who did not own their own car. Our people were abandoned. It took the heroic acts of private citizens to provide for all those who lost their homes. Also impressive is how Cuba responds to disasters in the world sending thosuands of doctors that save lives. And they also respond to the slow moving disasters of disease and poverty. Every year in fact hundreds of American youth from poor backgrounds study medicine free of charge in Cuba so they can go home and help their communities. Yet again I challenge you to leave the TV images of America behind and meet some real people just trying to get their families through the day. I myself just got laid off so did tens of thousands of people just last week. Saw Mills public schools banks factories ma and pop stores all closing down. Where will we all live when we can no longer pay rent. What will we do what about our dreams. Despite the textbook myths we cant all start a successful business or become president someday in order for a few to make it to the top in America they have to walk over the backs of millions of suffering people. I beg of Cubans and other people of the world don’t try to be like us. Our real culture is being suppresd its not about McDonalds reality TV MTV we are a people who are dominated by the will and whim of Wall Street bankers and crooked politicians thats not what you want.

  10. Bryce Phillips Horvath wrote:
    Honestly you are complaining about a temporary shortage of bananas due to a hurricane… Many of us can only dream of the kind of opportunities you have in Cuba

    You only stating an opinion, no serious statistics and references are provided. In this case I am providing you with serious statistics and references. Excerpt from:

    Castro’s Tyranny And The Hurricanes
    http://www.cubanet.org/news_eglish_january.html

    These figures are of highly questionable veracity. The statistics are never exact reflection of the reality, and even lend themselves to manipulation. The statistics in the Castro tyranny are deliberately distorted for advertising purposes, manipulating or simply hiding the information, like in the statistics of deaths caused by Hurricane Flora, as is shown next:

    Hurricane Flora caused havoc in Cuba. According to the Government statement 100 deaths were reported. Periódico Revolución, October of 1963.

    Flora caused near 1,000 deaths. Speech by Fidel Castro May 27, 1969.

    Hurricane Flora devastates Cuba: 1,159 corpses and numerous damages. Elmundo.com,
    July 25, 2001.

    A monument to remember the victims of Hurricane Flora, which killed more than
    1, 200 Cubans. Juventud Rebelde, October 7, 2003.

    The most deadly, however, was Flora in 1963, which left nearly 2,000 killed by the floods that occurred in the east of the island. Havana, September 13, 2004 (EFE).

    The statistics of the Castro tyranny speak for themselves.

    How many years must pass to really know the material losses and loss of human lives caused by the other hurricanes? The day is not far away when we can verify the veracity of these statistics.

  11. My Kingdom for a Banana
    31
    Mayo 11th, 2009

    Bryce Phillips Horvath wrote:
    [quote] Honestly you are complaining about a temporary shortage of bananas due to a hurricane… Many of us can only dream of the kind of opportunities you have in Cuba.[/quote]

    You only stating an opinion, no serious statistics and references are provided. In this case I am providing you with serious statistics and references. Excerpt from:

    [b]Castro’s Tyranny And The Hurricanes[/b]
    [url]http://www.cubanet.org/news_eglish_january.html[/url]

    These figures are of highly questionable veracity. The statistics are never exact reflection of the reality, and even lend themselves to manipulation. The statistics in the Castro tyranny are deliberately distorted for advertising purposes, manipulating or simply hiding the information, like in the statistics of deaths caused by Hurricane Flora, as is shown next:

    Hurricane Flora caused havoc in Cuba. According to the Government statement 100 deaths were reported. Periódico Revolución, October of 1963.

    Flora caused near 1,000 deaths. Speech by Fidel Castro May 27, 1969.

    Hurricane Flora devastates Cuba: 1,159 corpses and numerous damages. Elmundo.com,
    July 25, 2001.

    A monument to remember the victims of Hurricane Flora, which killed more than
    1, 200 Cubans. Juventud Rebelde, October 7, 2003.

    The most deadly, however, was Flora in 1963, which left nearly 2,000 killed by the floods that occurred in the east of the island. Havana, September 13, 2004 (EFE).

    The statistics of the Castro tyranny speak for themselves.

    How many years must pass to really know the material losses and loss of human lives caused by the other hurricanes? The day is not far away when we can verify the veracity of these statistics.

  12. Bryce Phillips Horvath wrote:
    [quote] Honestly you are complaining about a temporary shortage of bananas due to a hurricane… Many of us can only dream of the kind of opportunities you have in Cuba.[/quote]

    You only stating an opinion, no serious statistics and references are provided. In this case I am providing you with serious statistics and references. Excerpt from:

    [b]CASTRO’S TYRANNY AND THE HURRICANES[/b]
    [url]http://www.cubanet.org/news_eglish_january.html[/url]

    These figures are of highly questionable veracity. The statistics are never exact reflection of the reality, and even lend themselves to manipulation. The statistics in the Castro tyranny are deliberately distorted for advertising purposes, manipulating or simply hiding the information, like in the statistics of deaths caused by Hurricane Flora, as is shown next:

    Hurricane Flora caused havoc in Cuba. According to the Government statement 100 deaths were reported. Periódico Revolución, October of 1963.

    Flora caused near 1,000 deaths. Speech by Fidel Castro May 27, 1969.

    Hurricane Flora devastates Cuba: 1,159 corpses and numerous damages. Elmundo.com,
    July 25, 2001.

    A monument to remember the victims of Hurricane Flora, which killed more than
    1, 200 Cubans. Juventud Rebelde, October 7, 2003.

    The most deadly, however, was Flora in 1963, which left nearly 2,000 killed by the floods that occurred in the east of the island. Havana, September 13, 2004 (EFE).

    The statistics of the Castro tyranny speak for themselves.

    How many years must pass to really know the material losses and loss of human lives caused by the other hurricanes? The day is not far away when we can verify the veracity of these statistics.

  13. Honestly you are complaining about a temporary shortage of bananas due to a hurricane. When Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans more than 2000 people died including infants that died of starvation in the dismal and inhuman shelter the survivors were subjected to. In America life or death, prison or college is often determined by race or class or both. Most victims of Katrina were black and poor. That said the majority of the US’s poor population is white they are also most likely to be female, young and single mothers. Many of the poor have never seen a dentist. The only health care they receive is vaccine shots only given so they don’t spread their sickness to the “better sort” of people. How about our pervasive media culture telling our youth to be pimps and hos that girls need to be sexy and shake their booty, boys need to act tough mean and cold and act “gangsta” How about how our free media that tries to fire us up to let our government spend trillions on war and sacrifice 5000 soldiers and murder a million civilians. Its OK the media says because it teaches the majority white population to fear black and brown people. How about a cop pulling a young black man off a train and shooting him in the head for no reason which led to riots and fires. That was New Years in the oppressed but resisting city of Oakland CA, San Franciscos less glamorous working class neighbor city. Every day Americans lose their jobs then their houses and their kids drop out of school. Tampons and bananas are low on their list they just have to use the leaves of our famous but shrinking forests to deal with the bleeding. Every day America is bleeding as violence on the streets, expanding prisons crack,which carries a higher prison sentence then cocaine, our government introduced to us, drunk driving and other social ill claim young lives. Our President Obama watched his own mother die of cancer while the health insurance companies squeezed every penny they could out of her. Did I mention not to get hurt in America because an ambulance ride costs $500 at least. Did you know that at truck driving school in America drivers are taught to keep going if they hit somebody because it is cheaper for the corporation they drive for to pay for a funeral then a hospital operation. Did you know that in the land of the free protests are limited to special free speech zones surrounded by police,dogs and fences. Sadly many of our people numb the pain with TV cars prostitutes weed booze hard drugs internet addiction and many other mind numbing diversions. Hope is still there the struggle carries on. Many of us can only dream of the kind of opportunities you have in Cuba. Try living a while in the ghetto, an island of suffering in a sea of wealth. Try life on the Lakota Indian reservations of South Dakota where life expectancy is below 50. Pardon my American crudeness but quit your bitchin

  14. 27
    Darko
    Mayo 6th, 2009 at 19:25
    000000000000000000000000000000000

    Dear Darko, there is no to much difference between a Plantain tree and a Banana tree, the main difference is the fruit of those trees, a Plantain fruit can be 3-4 times bigger than a Banana and it consistence is much more harder. You can find more info in this link:
    http://www.thefreedictionary.com/plantain+tree

    Regards

  15. bananas and plantains are closely related plants. They are different species of the genus Musa. Thought to have originated in tropical Asia they have been spread by cultivation since before Alexander the great. They both grow on the non-woody, big leaved plants with that distinct tropical appearance. The plants are very easily damaged by wind so hurricanes really hurt the plantations where they are grown. Since plantains are picked green and then cooked they are much easier to harvest and transport without going bad.

  16. To Carbo Servia – sorry no problem. I obviously didn’t notice difference. I’ve been to Cuba 5 times and always thought that these are this small green ones. I also saw plantations all over Cuba of this green ones. What is the difference of the actual plant then?

  17. Darko
    Mayo 6th, 2009 at 11:30
    ……….I have eat fried bananas made of small green ones – they called them “tostones”…………
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Yes you are right. People use to make Tostones and Fufu of green banana when they can’t find Plantains but it is a very expensive substitution because with 2 full grown Plantains you can feed a whole family of 4 and using green bananas you will need a lot of them.
    The intention of my explanation was not to make you seem as an stupid. I am very sorry if I cause such impression to you.
    Regards

  18. Well it seems that I appear to be stupid in this whole discussion. I know what are the real bananas and I really did not eat yellow bananas that we in Europe normally consume. I have eat fried bananas made of small green ones – they called them “tostones”. And I always ate them that way on Cuba, as a potato I usually ate yucca and malanga.

  19. I struggled with which word to use and frankly kind of wimped out by using them both, although I used “banana” when I knew it was the wrong word.

    Why? Because I’m translating for ALL the English readers and I figure there are a whole lot of them who don’t really know what a plantain is. I know I have friends who, even when they see them in the store, just call them bananas, or “green bananas” or even “those kinds of bananas that you can’t really eat.” (?!?!? Mmmm-hmmm… that’s why the store stocks them… as a joke and a money loser!)

    Obviously they have never had Maduros which I think I could live on… yum! Every time I stay with a family anywhere where they have this dish, after the first time they serve it they make it for me every day. Sometimes every meal. I never complain!!!! I have never made it for myself because I’m afraid I’d never stop eating it!

    I know I could have used the headline: “My Kingdom for a Plantain” but it would not have carried the humor for most English readers that “Banana” does… and I do believe Yoani was trying to be a little humorous.

    You’ll also notice that I inserted a description of what “fufu” is, which is not in the original. I often do things like this to avoid footnotes… for example you’ll notice I often translate “Granma” as “the newspaper Granma.”

    So — forgive me my inaccuracies and transgressions. Some of them are mistakes of course, but sometimes I make a conscious choice to modify the translations to make them sound more “English-y”… and other times to add small amounts of information to make the meaning clear to the uninitiated reader.

    I think most the faithful readers of this blog and the comment section will agree… that we want to reach BEYOND Cuban-Americans and Friends-of-Cuba with this English blog, and bring in as many eyes as we can! At the same time, I try to be true to Yoani’s text, and honor the fact that she writes this blog first and foremost for her compatriots on the Island, even if they can’t see it through the normal channels.

    Sincerely,
    Your Friendly English Translator

  20. When I was in Cuba recently I was surprised to not see or eat any plantains. I did see and eat bananas though. If you read the Spanish blog, she is talking about the plantains.

  21. Are you kidding me???? I just came home from two weeks in Havana. And guess what??? I could buy bananas anywhere. Any market. And NOT in CUC. In National money. They were begging to sell them to us. So, please explain to me what you mean??? I have been following your blog for sometime…and recently I do not believe you are representing the WHOLE truth in Cuba. Why are you exaggerating???? There are enough stories to tell about Cuba and the hardships of daily life. Why this? This is almost Michael Moore like. And, don’t get me wrong, I love Michael Moore. But, he has a tendency to exaggerate the truth, even thought no exaggeration is needed. Please explain.

  22. 6
    Dear Translator, Dear Darko

    Yoani is talking in this wonderful article about two different fruits that have the same name in Spanish language. The first one is the Banana named in the first paragraph and discovered by the East German people after 50 years of communism and the second one is the Plantain named in the second and third paragraphs and considered, cooked and eaten by the cuban, puertorrican and dominican people not as a fruit but as a “vianda” (I don’t know the translation of “vianda”). Plantain is a variety of banana, a big one, that usually is eaten in its immature stage. “Fufu”, “Machiquillo” or “Mofongo” is the name given in different parts of the Caribbean Islands to the popular dish named by Yoani where plantain is boiled and mashed as a potato, mixed with a lot of garlic, pork fat or olive oil and pork meet. Another popular dishes made of Plantains is the “Maduros”, mature Plantain cut in slices and fried. “Tostones” (“Patacon Pisao”), immature Plantains cut in slices and cooked in slow fire and then pressed, faltered and fried. Plantain like beans, rice and pork conform the basic diet of the poor people in the Caribbean. Hurricanes usually make big damages in Plantain plantations and due to the importance of Plantains in the cuban’s diet this damage can cause hunger in the people.Plantain is an essential part of cubans diet, it is a must on the table in some parts of Cuba and the whole Dominican Republic.
    What you were invited to eat, dear Darko, by your friend in Cuba was bananas; a fruit that have not a big importance in cubans diet. Banana is eaten in actual Cuba as a luxury fruit that some times appears in the market and usually is only consumed by the children of the family, so if your friends left you to taste theirs bananas it means they have a great consideration for your person or they are have not children in the family.
    Regards

  23. Plantains are a staple of the Cuban diet. They are far different from the bananas the Germans got to taste. Plantains must be cooked and are not nearly as sweet as bananas. Here in Texas we can get some of the exotic bananas I know from travels in Mexico. The short fat red ones, the tiny sweet ladyfingers with the hints of pineapple and strawberrys. banana pancakes ! One of my friends in Cuba, she loves chicken, and chocolate. Two things we take so very much for granted. Two things she must stand in line for hours and hours just to taste a couple of times a month. If I could set down on her table something good to eat, it would be a dark chicken Mole, from the highlands of the Mexican state of Puebla, cooked with unsweetened cocoa. How I wish my friends could have all the chicken they would like.

  24. Black Cuban Dissident Leader Sends Letter to Members of Congress Who Recently Met With Fidel Castro

    Antunez’s sister to personally deliver on Wednesday letter to Lee, Richardson, and Rush

    WASHINGTON, May 5 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Berta Antunez, the sister of Jorge Luis Garcia Perez (“Antunez”), one of the most respected black leaders of the Cuban pro-democracy movement inside Cuba, will be in Washington on Wednesday, May 6th to personally deliver a letter from her brother to three Members of Congress who recently traveled to Cuba to meet with Fidel and Raul Castro.

    Last month Congresswomen Barbara Lee (D-CA) and Laura Richardson (D-CA) and Congressman Bobby L. Rush (D-IL) met with Fidel Castro in Havana but refused to meet with any members of the island’s pro-democracy movement. Antunez, who was incarcerated for 17 years and regularly beaten and tortured as a prisoner of conscience, was outraged that these Members of Congress would not take the time while in Cuba to meet with any of the island’s human rights and pro-democracy activists.

    Berta Antunez will be personally delivering the letter to the three offices on Capitol Hill on Wednesday, May 6th afternoon at 2:00 p.m. at 2444 Rayburn House Office Building, Congresswoman Lee’s office, and is requesting to meet with Lee, Richardson, and Rush to convey to them her brother’s message. “There are brave men and women within Cuba that need to be heard. I hope that these Members that traveled to Cuba to meet for hours with Castro, will take a few minutes to listen to the pleas of the victims of Castro’s repression,” stated Berta Antunez.

    The full text of the letter can be seen on http://www.CapitolHillCubans.com
    Contact: Mauricio Claver-Carone, 240-441-8345

  25. One more thing on the photo,

    Notice there is a little half moon pass-through in the window. The woman is some kind of clerk — maybe she trades ‘tarjetas blancas’ for bananas.

  26. Julio — an interesting interpretation of the photo! I wondered (with my simple mind) if the yellow edge of the clock and the yellow of her dress were supposed to represent bananas… maybe the clock isbananas and the dress is plantains!

    On swine flu and dengue… of course they were “invented” by the U.S. (with a little help from mother nature)… why not? Sadly, the fact that this kind of “germ warfare” has been practiced at some times somewhere by some people (I won’t cite examples since most are under dispute), gives the ring of plausibility to such charges and makes them stick.

  27. Running after a banana might just be the trick that provokes a stampede to freedom. One never knows in a dictatorship which spark lights the candle.

    In any case, with all the talk about bananas, let me clarify for our anglo readers that what Yoanni is really referring to is a “plantain” which is a different species of banana and from which completely different dishes are prepared. Plantains to cubans are what potatoes are to Americans or Irish. It is not eaten raw, but rather must be either boiled, fried or baked, either ripe or green. One can only imagine the sense of deprivation that the population must be feeling.

  28. Andy
    My interpretation of the picture is this

    There is a window everything outside is dark and we are able to see thru the window. A window to the live of a Cuban.

    Then, What do we see?

    A young woman working or possibly doing homework(“Free education”) in an office with the bare minimum, If you notice the time on the clock on the wall it seems to be 5 to 11 o’clock presumably night but I will dare say the darkness outside is not night but a symbol of the unknown. The fact that is almost 11 means is time to eat lunch or time to go home and she will give her own kingdom for a banana she does not have.

    I guess that’s my take on it :D

    So in other words The revolution gave her the “free education” but is not able to give them a simple banana.

  29. Is the title paraphrasing Shakespeare?

    “A horse, a horse, my kingdom for a horse! ”

    from Richard III play

    Beautiful!

    In Cuban slang Fidel Castro is called the horse (“El caballo”) so Yoani have replace el Caballo for a banana! :D

    She wants practical things, food on the table not ideals and utopias from “El caballo”

  30. Not only the Bananas have been lost in Cuba, the Cubans had lost Clothing, Houses, Food, Water, Transportation ,, all kind of Fruits, Sugar (from Sugar Cane), expression , freedom of speech, freedom of religion, etc, etc, etc,,,,,the resume of it, is just they had lost HOPE!!!!!,,,but mainly their FREEDOM!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Only, when both Castros (Fidel and Raul) as well as their Maffiosa Gang, all them together will be out of the game, dead !!!!, in hell!!!!!, only at that time, Cuba will be able to start her recovery from that disaster,,,only then, Cubans will start to think about Freedom and Hope,,,not before, not now!!!!.

    Candido

  31. Sorry to break in again, but I’ve just read in “Juventud Rebelde” that bio-medical research by Fidel – the great hybridizer and inventor of the exploding cow – has revealed that swine flue and dengue are both caused by the United States. Reminds me of Nazi propaganda about the contagions supposedly carried by Jews and Gypsies.

  32. perhaps we can organise some shipments of Fairtrade bananas to Cuba as part of our Solidarity work!

  33. Not what we British refer to disparagingly as a “banana republic,” then! No, something far worse than that!

  34. Well I think that this time Yoani really over exaggerate. I was in Cuba in February (in casas not in some expensive resorts), I was invited to dinner in two families (not some state sponsored people) – my friends from my past visits – and there were bananas all the time. So I really don’t quite get what she is talking about?

  35. Can anyone explain to me the link between the photograph and the post? I just don’t get it!

  36. Believe me, if wild bananas can grow in New Orleans (although they aren’t good enough to eat because of the quick but cool winter season), then surely those things can grow all over Cuba, can’t they? Sad. We also grow sugar cane and I have a bottle of New Orleans rum in my liquor cabinet. I mean, if we can do it, Cuba has to be able to do it, doesn’t it? Sad.

  37. In Cuba, the most outrageous things become reality. Only in Cuba.

  38. Yoani, I wonder what would be the equivalent of a banana for you and other Cubans. What exotic taste or sound or image have you been deprived of, perhaps without even knowing, that we all take absolutely for granted.

Comments are closed.