Losing a Tooth, Winning a Number

lector_granma
Months ago I dreamt I lost a tooth. That tiny one on the side that’s been with me for more than thirty years. An incisor that has never moved and that I should care for, knowing it can’t be replaced. If my grandmother were alive she would have interpreted these dream experiences as “an omen that someone is going to die.” Anna associated dreams in which molars, eyeteeth, or front teeth fell out with the loss of a loved one; she had dentures and had buried almost all of her friends from her generation.

I analyzed the superstition coldly and remembered that in our illegal lottery the number eight is also called “death.” It wasn’t hard to find the neighborhood ticket seller; despite a five decade crack down, the well known bolita is present on every block in my country, with the most popular and well-established lottery being the one run by the Committees for the Defense of the Revolution themselves. A clandestine network collects the risky money until the bolitero hears the winning numbers on Venezuelan or Miami radio and delivers to each bettor their respective winnings. So, any daily situation can be reinterpreted as a prediction, and you can bet on the numbers between 1 and 100 in hopes of winning a tidy sum. In colloquial speech, when someone says “butterfly,” “horse” or “buzzard” they are referring 2, 1 and 33 in the clandestine raffle, and “nuns” are a reference to the number five.

So I ventured out and put twenty pesos on the number that signifies a funeral. As I expected, I didn’t win anything. Still, I’m not about to give up, to the point where I still poke through the daily paper, Granma, to look for some figure to improve my luck. The first reward I enjoyed from the lottery was when, being a teenager, I ventured on a striking 90 (the number that corresponds to “old man”), taken from a headline in the official organ of the Cuban Communist Party. Believe me, many Cubans read that paper to hunt for clues to guide them in our most popular sweepstakes, not to find real news. Like a secret code, we analyze announcements, dreams, political billboards, anniversaries… signs of reality that are translated into numbers for the forbidden lottery.

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20 thoughts on “Losing a Tooth, Winning a Number

  1. Your solution could work only if people would uprise violently against the regime once the supplies run out.

    On the other side Canada would not impose an embargo unless there is a war crisis. Canadian tourists :) would take the embargo to the Supreme Court of Canada. It;s so funny to watch what happens here when the Governement of Canada comes out with restrictive laws…they end up in Court.

  2. I answered your question Igor, I am for total isolation and embargo.That in my mind would more rapidly bring about the regimes collapse. If we are in agreement that the solution to Cuba’s situation is regime change then the issue is what would be the most expeditious way to bring this about. Do we acomplish this through engagement, granting of credit, subsidies, and the infusion of massive amounts of capital through the arrival of American tourists? I think not but I am under no illusion that this is a viable option that anyone is considering. The US is the only nation currently holding the position I expouse but unfortunately the winds are beginning to blow in the wrong direction under Obama’s stewardship. I don’t concur with your comparison to North Korea and the conclusions you reach. The Koreans have a culture steeped in isolation (the Hermit Kingdom), Cuba does not.

  3. Yubano, I decided to live my country in 2000, 10 years after the Iron Curtain disapperead. I left because my country was taken over by thugs ( most of them were the bureacrats of the communism regime) who made it actually worst. Last week a recent poll revealed that over 60% of Romanians would vote for Ceausescu. As I am in exile ( I think we could call this an economic exile) I feel that I owe it to myself to go cu Cuba once in a while and “feel the rush”. After I get home from a trip like this I am ready for an intelectual combat with my family/friends who are claiming that “it was better under communism.”

    You still have to answer my question. Do you think that a total isolationism would be better for Cuba. I have North Korea in mind when say isolationism.

    PS: me and my wife are enjoying Cuba also for its culture and people. I would never go to the Dominican or Mexico where people are begging for money at every corner. In Cuba the people are different. In my many trips nobody asked us for money. Some asked us to give em sopa, gum, or chocolate but they did not asked for money. Once I wanted to give one man who had only one leg 3 CUC and he refused me.

    I am totally against communism, castro and all that BS that takes place in Cuba, however I belive that by imposing a total embargo on tourism Cubans will lose contact to the real world. Nevermind about the CIA agents who enter Cuba with Canadian and British passports.

  4. Igor, I would most certainly would be in favor of a total embargo of the castro regime including a travel ban. I find the entire concept of “tourism” in a country where it’s people are suffering under a dictatorship as repugnent. I am repelled by this concept of tourism where people travel to Cuba to either enjoy it’s beaches, exploit it’s women and ignore the political situation, or alternatively to visit Cuba as a sort of Natural Geographic zoological experience to see how the monkeys live in their unnatural habitats. The end result is the same in either case, more hard currency for the castros to maintain their grip around the neck of the Cuban people. On a more personal level Igor I am somewhat perplexed as to why anyone who lived under a dictarship in the past would want to go to Cuba to “reminisce”. Is this just morbid curiosity or some sort of bizarre S&M at work here?

  5. Yubano, are you suggesting that Canada should ban travel to Cuba ? Would you endorse a total tourist embargo from the rest of the world also ? In my opinion this would just transform Cuba into a second North Korea. As things are right now, at least a small percentage of tourists are exploring the real Cuba as they adventure past the hotel gates and they can see for themselves how communism, socialism and corruption can destroy a nation. We (me and my wife ) love to explore Havana on our own and we can see how Cubans live their lives. We can actually relate to what is happening there as our childhood and youth was wasted behind the Iron Curtain.

  6. WALL STREET JOURNAL: A Master Of Sweet Deals -The remarkable life of a sugar tycoon in pre-Castro Cuba. By EDUARDO KAPLAN- AUGUST 3, 2010

    In 1934, with the world in the throes of the Depression, an enterprising trader brought the New York sugar market to its knees, orchestrating what he later described as “the only perfect squeeze that was ever pulled.”

    Julio Lobo, the Venezuela-born Cuban citizen who engineered the coup from his Wall Street office, had already gained notice in trading circles after closing the largest single sale of sugar in the previous decade. The New York squeeze placed him in a different league. Lobo rightly estimated that a new U.S. quota capping imports of Cuban sugar would keep the American domestic supply in check and support rising prices. His gambit paid off, forcing investors who bet that prices would drop to buy into a fast-rising market to cover their positions.

    When Lobo was done, the magnitude of the paper losses incurred—in the billions in today’s dollars—by major investors of the era, including a consortium led by John D. Rockefeller, prompted the U.S. government to take action. Trading was suspended, and the president of the New York exchange resigned. Senate hearings followed. In the end, U.S. investors were allowed to purchase sugar at a fixed price that protected their interests. Still, the squeeze showed that Cuban traders could play the market as well as any sophisticated investor.

    Lobo was in his mid-30s at the time and well on his way to earning the title Sugar King. For the next three decades he more than lived up to the nickname, becoming one of the most vivid characters in Cuba during an over-the-top era. This great and forgotten business figure has at last been rescued by John Paul Rathbone in “The Sugar King of Havana,” an entertaining biography that is also a portrait of Cuba between the island’s independence in the late 19th century and Fidel Castro’s march into Havana in January 1959.

    At the height of his reign, Lobo controlled about half of Cuba’s sugar sales to the U.S., half of Puerto Rico’s and about 60% of the sugar sold by the Philippines. By the 1950s he was the richest man in Cuba, a position he held until Castro nationalized his holdings in 1960, forcing him into exile.

    Lobo’s activities weren’t confined to the world of business. He was a philanthropist who improved the living conditions of the workers at his mills. He found time to become a collector of Napoleonic artifacts. And then there were his brushes with death—in 1933, during a period of political unrest, he was spared from a firing squad, and in 1944 he survived an assassination attempt.

    As his fortune and reputation grew, movie stars such as Joan Fontaine and Bette Davis found their way to his side, inspiring tales in keeping with the anything-goes, gilded-age atmosphere of pre-Castro Cuba. When Lobo was expecting a visit at one of his estates from Esther Williams—the star of MGM’s aquatic-themed movies—he had the swimming pool filled with perfume.

    The years of Lobo’s rise roughly parallels the brief but critical period when Cuba experienced its birth pangs as a nation. The period is often cast along narrow ideological lines. For those who believe that Castro’s revolution brought the island a sense of national dignity and independence, the era of the republic is defined by savage capitalism and the abuse of power. Critics of Castro’s regime, by contrast, note that during the republic many Cubans enjoyed the best living standards in the region. Mr. Rathbone shows us a Cuba that is developing its contradictions, so to speak—a place with a vibrant business class and cultural life and a tumultuous political class that fails to develop the institutions of a strong civil society.

    Most of all, of course, “The Sugar King of Havana” is the portrait of a remarkable man and outsize tycoon. Mr. Rathbone, the Latin American editor for the Financial Times, dives into Lobo’s life through letters, documents, and interviews with family members, business associates and friends. He also brings his own family’s history into the story—Mr. Rathbone is the son of a Cuban exile who, back home, had moved in the haute bourgeois circles frequented by the Lobo family.

    Cuba’s fate was mainly dependent on sugar at the time of Lobo’s birth in 1898, and sugar continued to dominate the island’s economy well after his exile. Though not an heir to a sugar fortune, Lobo was born into privilege, the son of a Venezuelan banker of Sephardic Jewish roots. He was sent to the best schools in Cuba and at age 16 enrolled at Columbia University in New York. A career in law seemed in the cards, but a year later he transferred to Louisiana State University to become what he called “a sugar expert.” Twenty years later a Havana newspaper dubbed him “The New Sugar Magus.”

    As one of the leading figures in the sugar industry, Lobo came into contact with almost every major player in Cuban politics and finance. He also crossed paths with the revolutionaries who would eventually take over his business and demonize his class. He somehow managed to thrive with people of different classes and political orientations. As Mr. Rathbone shows, he had a direct personal manner, a strong work ethic and of course a shrewd business sense. He belonged to a commercial class that believed they could make Cuba great through wealth-creation. Even during labor conflicts, union leaders would acknowledge that Lobo had created the best working conditions in the country.

    Even the new revolutionary regime, when it finally arrived, recognized Lobo’s skills. Mr. Rathbone describes a meeting between Lobo and Ernesto “Che” Guevara, then president of Cuba’s central bank. Guevara praises the transparency of Lobo’s accounts and asks him to stay in Cuba to run the country’s sugar operations. Lobo declines and goes into exile soon after Castro nationalized the sugar industry.

    Lobo moved to Spain with very little money, thinking, as many exiles did, that Castro would not last long. He spent the rest of his life in Madrid, living off the sale of some of the Napoleonic artifacts his family was able to get out of Cuba and contributions from his daughters. He died in 1983.

    Mr. Kaplan is an editor at Dow Jones Newswires.

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703700904575391632047602978.html

  7. HOPEFULLY ALL THESE TITLES WILL BE AVAILABLE IN ENGLISH TOO! SPREAD THE WORD! INFORMATION IN THE BEST TOOL FOR TRUE FREEDOM FOR ALL! LEFT, RIGHT AND IN BETWEEN!

    AMAZON BOOKS BY YOANI SANCHEZ, LADIES IN WHITE, OSWALDO PAYA.
    (see link at bottom)
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    http://www.amazon.com/Cuba-libre-Free-Spanish/dp/8483069067

  8. REUTERS: SCENARIOS-Many unknowns about Cuba private employment plan-By Jeff Franks-Mon Aug 2, 2010

    HAVANA Aug 2 (Reuters) – President Raul Castro has announced that more Cubans will be allowed to work for themselves and to hire employees as the government looks for ways to put up to 1 million state workers in more productive jobs on the communist-ruled Caribbean island.

    He made the announcement in a stern speech to the National Assembly in Havana on Sunday in which he told Cubans: “We have to wipe out forever the notion that Cuba is the only country in the world in which one can live without working.”

    Much remains unknown about this work plan, and the devil will be in the details in terms of its impact on a state-dominated society and economy long accustomed to all-encompassing socialist welfare.

    The following is a look at some possibilities:

    HISTORY AS A GUIDE?

    The Cuban government adopted a similar measure in the 1990s when Cuba’s economy plummeted after the fall of the Soviet Union, its top ally and benefactor. To stimulate economic activity, licenses were handed out for enterprises ranging from restaurants to clowns, which helped Cubans survive that deep economic crisis known as the “special period.”

    But as the economy recovered, the government returned to its old ways and many licenses were not renewed.

    At the end of 2009, out of 11 million Cubans, there were only 143,800 registered self-employed workers or “cuenta propistas,” as they are known.

    Will the same thing happen this time? Will the government pull the plug on the self-employed once the Cuban economy, which has been in crisis again the past two years, improves?

    Nobody knows, of course, but one difference is the government’s new goal of redeploying those 1 million “excess” workers over the next five years. If it sticks to that plan, it should give the move toward self-employment more staying power, because all those individuals will have to work somewhere.

    LOT OF UNKNOWNS

    President Castro gave few details about the labor plan, including whether the government would limit the number of licenses or give them out freely. Obviously, the more licenses, the broader the impact, especially to the extent that licensees may hire others to work for them.

    There are already many people in Cuba illegally working privately, but the total is unknown, although it is believed the number could be tens and possibly hundreds of thousands.

    Analysts are divided on the importance of Castro’s announcement, with some saying it does not address the basic inefficiences of Cuban communism or the economic needs of many Cubans. Others say it represents the government’s recognition that some things are better done by private workers.

    It is not a panacea for Cuba’s economic problems, the analysts say, but if nothing else it should enable the licensees to make more money, the lack of which is the principal complaint of most ordinary Cubans who rail against low average salaries equivalent to $18 a month.

    Some see it leading towards wider changes.

    “It will be very difficult to reverse the process,” dissident Cuban economist Oscar Espinosa Chepe said.

    “This opens the possibility of creating small- and medium-sized companies in fields like gastronomy and construction. This can give tremendous agility to the Cuban economy,” he said.

    POSSIBLE POLITICAL CONSEQUENCES

    There is also the possibility that the changes could have political implications as more people — in a country where the state has traditionally controlled 90 percent or more of the economy — grow accustomed to operating outside the system.

    But the government is likely to keep a close eye on the private workers, if for no other reason than it views them as a source of tax income. It is perhaps indicative that Castro gave as many details about how the newly self-employed will be taxed as he did about the rest of the program.

    Some analysts believe that allowing more people independent sources of income, and reducing the number of those who are dependent on state jobs, could also encourage more dissidence and open criticism of the government.

    But Castro and other Cuban leaders have repeatedly made clear the idea is to “update” Cuban socialism, not switch to capitalism. (Additional reporting by Esteban Israel; Editing by Pascal Fletcher and Cynthia Osterman)

    http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSN0211091520100802

  9. NOW THE CANADIAN PUBLIC KNOW BETTER HOW YOANI AND OTHER CUBANS LIVING IN THE ISLAND GO THRU WHEN THEY ARE DENIED FREEDOM OF TRAVEL!

    THE GLOBE AND MAIL: New delays in release of Canadian man held in Cuba – Cody LeCompte, 19, has been stuck on the Caribbean island since a car accident in late April-The Canadian Press- Tuesday, Aug. 03, 2010

    Cody LeCompte’s family is hoping Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Peter Kent can intervene again to speed up Mr. LeCompte’s return to Canada from Cuba.

    The 19-year-old man from Simcoe, Ont., has been held in Cuba since a car accident in late April.

    Last week Cuban police agreed to let Mr. LeCompte’s family post bail of 2,000 Cuban pesos, or about $100, on the condition he return to Cuba for a trial.

    Mr. LeCompte had been expecting to return today, but the family was told Monday that all the necessary paperwork has not been completed by Cuban officials to lift a restriction on his passport.

    Mr. Kent took the matter up last week with a Cuban official in Ottawa and Mr. LeCompte’s mother, Danette, said today they have been trying to reach the minister about the latest delays.

    She told The Canadian Press says they are trying to remain hopeful, but “there’s always something else.”

    The document releasing Mr. LeCompte’s passport has been signed by the prosecutor, but it also has to be signed by a representative of Cuba’s foreign affairs Department.

    Cuban foreign affairs then needs to contact the Cuban immigration department, who will conduct a review and may, or may not release his passport.

    The LeComptes were planning to fly to Toronto on Tuesday afternoon, and then head home to Simcoe — where a homecoming party had been planned.

    The ordeal began three months ago, when the rental car Mr. LeCompte was driving was side-swiped by a pick up truck.

    His mother and uncle Gary Parmenter were passengers in the car, along with his uncle’s Cuban fiancee.

    Mr. Parmenter’s fiancee was severely injured and needed an operation to remove part of her liver. She has since fully recovered.

    The driver of the truck was not injured.

    Mr. LeCompte’s mother was later told that drivers must be 21 to rent a car, but the rental agency allowed her son to drive even though his licence showed him to be 19.

    A few days later the family tried to catch a flight home, but Mr. LeCompte was told that he could not leave the country.

    Since then, the ordeal has cost the family more than $30,000.

    The LeComptes’ situation has received media attention across the country, and a Facebook group called Bring Cody LeCompte Home, has over 3,000 members.

    Aurel Braun, a professor of international law and political science at the University of Toronto, says Canada has a great deal of leverage with Cuba.

    “They are aware of the fact that we are an important trading partner, they understand that a significant number of tourists come from Canada and their economy desperately needs Canadians,” he said.

    Mr. Braun says Cuba has always been cold to foreign countries trying to interfere with its affairs.

    However, despite the apparent delays in dealing with the LeCompte case, Mr. Braun says the Canadian government has one of the best records for protecting its citizens abroad.

    “This country has been willing to stand up for its citizens more than many other countries — sometimes putting at risk relations to other states,” he said.

    A government issued advisory says accidents are a frequent cause of arrest and detention of Canadians in Cuba, and accidents resulting in death or injury are treated as crimes. The onus is on the driver to prove innocence.

    Mr. LeCompte must return to Cuba for a trial, which will determine if he faces any charges for the accident. If he is convicted, the family has been told he could face time in a Cuban prison.

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/americas/new-delays-in-release-of-canadian-man-held-in-cuba/article1660133/

  10. I’ve been to Cuba 3 times. Twice for a holiday, one for a humanitarian trip.
    I’m not going back to Cuba. I hope Canadians rethink their winter vacation plans.
    This unfortunate situation has received a lot of publicity all across Canada.

  11. Hopefully this unfortunate experience for the young Canadian will cause some of his countrymen to reassess Canada’s shameful relationship with the cuban dictatorship.

  12. FROM castro’s SPEECH JANUARY 1959
    -…”There is nothing left for me to
    add, except, with modesty and sincerity to say, with the deepest emotion,
    that you will always have in us, in the fighters of the Revolution, loyal
    servants whose sole motto is service to you.

    On this date, today, when Dr. Urrutia took over the Presidency of
    the Republic Dr. Urrutia, the leader who declared that this was a just
    Revolution — on territory that has been liberated, which by now is the
    whole of our country, I declare that I will assume only those duties
    assigned to me, by him. The full authority of the Republic is vested in
    him. And our arms bow respectfully to the civil powers of the Civilian
    Republic of Cuba. All I have to say is that we hope that he will fulfill
    his duty because we naturally feel assured that he will know how to fulfill
    his duty. I surrender my authority to the Provisional President of the
    Republic of Cuba and with it I surrender to him the right to address the
    people of Cuba…-”
    Promises … promises … promises …

  13. CAN WE ALL SPELL E X T O R T I O N!
    Extortion, outwresting, and/or exaction is a criminal offense which occurs when a person unlawfully obtains either money, property or services from a person(s), entity, or institution, through coercion.

    THE CANADIAN STAR: Canadian teen stuck in Cuba hits another roadblock-Jayme Poisson-August 3, 2010

    The Canadian teen who has been stuck in Cuba for three months hit another roadblock Monday after learning there are still restrictions on his passport that bar him from leaving the country.
    Cody LeCompte, a 19-year-old from Norfolk County, tried to book his trip home to Canada on Monday after Cuban officials told him last week that he could go home.

    But when a travel agent tried to purchase the ticket, the LeCompte family was told they still had many bureaucratic obstacles to overcome.

    “Cody is absolutely devastated,” Danette LeCompte said from Santa Lucia, where she has been trying to secure her son’s release. “He was so looking forward to going home.”

    Prohibited from leaving the country since getting into a car accident in April, Cuban police let LeCompte’s family post bail last week on the condition he return for a trial.

    The family obliged, and paid the 2,000 Cuban pesos ($100 Canadian). LeCompte’s uncle, Gary Parmenter, was told by an official at the Canadian embassy in Havana Monday morning the prosecution had signed off on the agreement and that Cuba’s immigration department just needed to lift a ban on his passport, which was expected to have been done.

    But later in the afternoon, when LeCompte tried to book his trip with a travel agent in Canada, the teen learned he still wasn’t free to go. Parmenter said a Cuban lawyer explained that in addition to the bail conditions being approved, a document clearing the passport also needs to be signed by Cuba’s foreign affairs department.

    After that happens, the Cuban immigration department must conduct a review and sign off, Parmenter said, adding there is no assurance that will happen.

    “We’ve gone through a roller coster ride for three months,” Danette LeCompte said. “It’s just another delay on top of everything we’ve been through.”

    It’s unclear how long it will take for the approvals to come through, she said, adding “the problem with Cuba is that you don’t get timelines for anything.”

    The ordeal began April 29 when the rental car LeCompte was driving was side-swiped by a pickup truck. The accident sent him, his mother, his uncle and his uncle’s Cuban fiancé to hospital. All have recovered from their injuries.

    All accidents resulting in death or injury in Cuba are treated as possible crimes and LeCompte was ordered to remain in the country until the case was resolved.

    The family says the situation has cost them $30,000.

    Last week, Peter Kent, junior foreign affairs minister, expressed concern that the investigation was taking too long. He said “the delay faced by Canadians awaiting resolution of such cases could affect fellow Canadians’ choice of Cuba as a tourist destination.”

    According to the Department of Foreign Affairs, 108 Canadians have been arrested or detained in Cuba since 2006; about 10 per cent of the cases are vehicle-related.

    About one million Canadians visited Cuba last year.

    Although LeCompte expects to eventually leave Cuba, he will have to return for his trial, which will determine if he faces any charges. If found guilty, LeCompte has been told he could face time in a Cuban prison.

    With files from The Canadian Press

    http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/transportation/article/843136–canadian-teen-stuck-in-cuba-hits-another-roadblock?bn=1

  14. 59 is crazy.Who took power in 1959?…The craziest of all.

    How old is the biggest tragedy of Cuban History? He is actually 83

    He will be 84 in acouple of weeks.He is full of murderous blood and with plenty of money.

  15. Here are the numbers of Cuban charade:

    1
    horse Here are the numbers of Cuban charade:

    1
    horse
    51
    soldier

    2
    butterfly, money and man
    52
    bike

    3
    sailor toddler
    53
    electric light kiss

    4
    cat, mouth, tooth
    54
    flowers

    5
    nun, sea and letter
    55
    crab. island to punches, bat

    6
    turtle
    56
    merengue queen shirt

    7
    snail and shit
    57
    bed, cable and stab

    8
    dead
    58
    Portrait of a knife, adultery

    9
    elephant language
    59
    crazy

    10
    big fish
    60
    clown egg

    11
    rooster
    61
    big horse and rice

    12
    harlot
    62
    marriage

    13
    peacock and big boy
    63
    bandit

    14
    tiger cat, cemetery and lovers
    64
    dead man

    15
    dog, pretty girl
    65
    food

    16
    bull and holy woman
    66
    jar, pair of mares

    17
    Moon, San Lazaro
    67
    stab

    18
    small fish
    68
    cemetery

    19
    worm, flag
    69
    well

    20
    fine cat, and potty tibor
    70
    coconut

    21
    boa, money
    71
    river

    22
    toad
    72
    ox jicotea Necklace

    23
    steam
    73
    case

    24
    dove
    74
    Kite, military

    25
    fine stone, new house
    75
    tie, guitar

    26
    eel, new medical
    76
    ballerina

    27
    wasp
    77
    Italian flag crutches S. Lazarus

    28
    kid
    78
    chest and died

    29
    mouse
    79
    freight train, lizard

    30
    shrimp dick
    80
    old doctor, desperate

    31
    deer and shoe
    81
    theater

    32
    pig
    82
    mother lion

    33
    and mother buzzard
    83
    tragedy

    34
    monkey
    84
    blood banker

    35
    spider
    85
    mirror clock

    36
    Hookah
    86
    scissors, hose

    37
    witch, brown chicken, ant
    87
    banana

    38
    macao, money
    88
    Miguel Mariano, eyeglasses, worm

    39
    rabbit, snake
    89
    plenty of water, old house

    40
    cure blood
    90
    old

    41
    lizard
    91
    Communist espadrille

    42
    duck far country
    92
    big pig, plane, balloon

    43
    scorpion
    93
    ring

    44
    leather and Guacara years with Guacas (tortilla)
    94
    machete, Havana

    45
    Shark, president
    95
    war

    46
    baby, smoke
    96
    shoe, old whore

    47
    bird
    97
    mosquito, cricket

    48
    cockroach, fan
    98
    piano

    49
    drunk
    99
    saw, crow, saithe

    50
    water police
    100
    toilets, car

    2
    butterfly, money and man

    3
    sailor toddler
    4
    cat, mouth, tooth
    5
    nun, sea and letter
    6
    turtle

    7
    snail and shit

    8
    dead
    9
    elephant language

    10
    big fish

    11
    rooster
    12
    harlot

    13
    peacock and big boy

    14
    tiger cat, cemetery and lovers

    15
    dog, pretty girl

    16
    bull and holy woman

    17
    Moon, San Lazaro

    18
    small fish

    19
    worm, flag

    20
    fine cat, and potty tibor

    21
    boa, money
    22
    toad
    23
    steam

    24
    dove

    25
    fine stone, new house
    26
    eel, new medical

    27
    wasp
    28
    kid
    29
    mouse
    30
    shrimp dick
    31
    deer and shoe
    32
    pig
    33
    and mother buzzard

    34
    monkey

    35
    spider

    36
    Hookah

    37
    witch, brown chicken, ant
    38
    macao, money
    39
    rabbit, snake
    40
    cure blood
    41
    lizard
    42
    duck far country

    43
    scorpion
    44
    leather and Guacara years with Guacas (tortilla)
    45
    Shark, president
    46
    baby, smoke
    47
    bird

    48
    cockroach, fan

    49
    drunk

    50
    water police

    Here are the numbers of Cuban charade:

    1
    horse
    51
    soldier

    2
    butterfly, money and man
    52
    bike

    3
    sailor toddler
    53
    electric light kiss

    4
    cat, mouth, tooth
    54
    flowers

    5
    nun, sea and letter
    55
    crab. island to punches, bat

    6
    turtle
    56
    merengue queen shirt

    7
    snail and shit
    57
    bed, cable and stab

    8
    dead
    58
    Portrait of a knife, adultery

    9
    elephant language
    59
    crazy

    10
    big fish
    60
    clown egg

    11
    rooster
    61
    big horse and rice

    12
    harlot
    62
    marriage

    13
    peacock and big boy
    63
    bandit

    14
    tiger cat, cemetery and lovers
    64
    dead man

    15
    dog, pretty girl
    65
    food

    16
    bull and holy woman
    66
    jar, pair of mares

    17
    Moon, San Lazaro
    67
    stab

    18
    small fish
    68
    cemetery

    19
    worm, flag
    69
    well

    20
    fine cat, and potty tibor
    70
    coconut

    21
    boa, money
    71
    river

    22
    toad
    72
    ox jicotea Necklace

    23
    steam
    73
    case

    24
    dove
    74
    Kite, military

    25
    fine stone, new house
    75
    tie, guitar

    26
    eel, new medical
    76
    ballerina

    27
    wasp
    77
    Italian flag crutches S. Lazarus

    28
    kid
    78
    chest and died

    29
    mouse
    79
    freight train, lizard

    30
    shrimp dick
    80
    old doctor, desperate

    31
    deer and shoe
    81
    theater

    32
    pig
    82
    mother lion

    33
    and mother buzzard
    83
    tragedy

    34
    monkey
    84
    blood banker

    35
    spider
    85
    mirror clock

    36
    Hookah
    86
    scissors, hose

    37
    witch, brown chicken, ant
    87
    banana

    38
    macao, money
    88
    Miguel Mariano, eyeglasses, worm

    39
    rabbit, snake
    89
    plenty of water, old house

    40
    cure blood
    90
    old

    41
    lizard
    91
    Communist espadrille

    42
    duck far country
    92
    big pig, plane, balloon

    43
    scorpion
    93
    ring

    44
    leather and Guacara years with Guacas (tortilla)
    94
    machete, Havana

    45
    Shark, president
    95
    war

    46
    baby, smoke
    96
    shoe, old whore

    47
    bird
    97
    mosquito, cricket

    48
    cockroach, fan
    98
    piano

    49
    drunk
    99
    saw, crow, saithe

    50
    water police
    100
    toilets, car

    Here are the numbers of Cuban charade:

    1
    horse
    51
    soldier

    2
    butterfly, money and man
    52
    bike

    3
    sailor toddler
    53
    electric light kiss

    4
    cat, mouth, tooth
    54
    flowers

    5
    nun, sea and letter
    55
    crab. island to punches, bat

    6
    turtle
    56
    merengue queen shirt

    7
    snail and shit
    57
    bed, cable and stab

    8
    dead
    58
    Portrait of a knife, adultery

    9
    elephant language
    59
    crazy

    10
    big fish
    60
    clown egg

    11
    rooster
    61
    big horse and rice

    12
    harlot
    62
    marriage

    13
    peacock and big boy
    63
    bandit

    14
    tiger cat, cemetery and lovers
    64
    dead man

    15
    dog, pretty girl
    65
    food

    16
    bull and holy woman
    66
    jar, pair of mares

    17
    Moon, San Lazaro
    67
    stab

    18
    small fish
    68
    cemetery

    19
    worm, flag
    69
    well

    20
    fine cat, and potty tibor
    70
    coconut

    21
    boa, money
    71
    river

    22
    toad
    72
    ox jicotea Necklace

    23
    steam
    73
    case

    24
    dove
    74
    Kite, military

    25
    fine stone, new house
    75
    tie, guitar

    26
    eel, new medical
    76
    ballerina

    27
    wasp
    77
    Italian flag crutches S. Lazarus

    28
    kid
    78
    chest and died

    29
    mouse
    79
    freight train, lizard

    30
    shrimp dick
    80
    old doctor, desperate

    31
    deer and shoe
    81
    theater

    32
    pig
    82
    mother lion

    33
    and mother buzzard
    83
    tragedy

    34
    monkey
    84
    blood banker

    35
    spider
    85
    mirror clock

    36
    Hookah
    86
    scissors, hose

    37
    witch, brown chicken, ant
    87
    banana

    38
    macao, money
    88
    Miguel Mariano, eyeglasses, worm

    39
    rabbit, snake
    89
    plenty of water, old house

    40
    cure blood
    90
    old

    41
    lizard
    91
    Communist espadrille

    42
    duck far country
    92
    big pig, plane, balloon

    43
    scorpion
    93
    ring

    44
    leather and Guacara years with Guacas (tortilla)
    94
    machete, Havana

    45
    Shark, president
    95
    war

    46
    baby, smoke
    96
    shoe, old whore

    47
    bird
    97
    mosquito, cricket

    48
    cockroach, fan
    98
    piano

    49
    drunk
    99
    saw, crow, saithe

    50
    water police

  16. EL IMPARCIAL: Yoani Sánchez: Cuba libre. Vivir y escribir en La Habana-Jorge Pato García-2 de agosto de 2010

    En estos momentos en los que el país gobernado por la dictadura castrista está tan de actualidad por diversos motivos políticos y humanitarios, llega a nuestras librerías, a través de la editorial Debate, Cuba libre. Vivir y escribir en La Habana. La afamada y premiada bloguera Yoani Sánchez nos da a conocer en este libro diferentes reflexiones que, desde 2007, han ido apareciendo en su bitácora virtual.

    Si algo cabe destacar de estas diferentes entradas, es que cada una de ellas se convierte en una mirilla por la que se pueden ver los entresijos de la realidad que viven los cubanos. Lejos de la imagen paradisíaca que dan lujosos complejos hoteleros a los que acuden los turistas, hay una dura situación que Yoani Sánchez ha retratado y ha querido compartir con todo el mundo.

    Gracias a Internet y a esa enorme capacidad de propagación de información que posee, las historias que se dan a conocer desde Cuba han llegado a cualquier punto del globo. La necesidad de Yoani Sánchez de relatar al exterior la realidad de su vida cotidiana, ha sido mucho más fuerte que las trabas, leyes y amenazas que le han llegado desde las clases dirigentes de su país.

    Pero no sólo la recopilación de entradas del blog son representativas de las circunstancias presentes en la isla caribeña; la introducción del libro, con sus dos apartados “Garras y alas” y “Radioactividad,” da buena idea de los sacrificios que Yoani Sánchez ha tenido que hacer regresando a su tierra natal —de la que estuvo apartada durante dos años— desde Suiza, pese a la opinión de sus familiares y seres queridos.

    Las garras y las alas, son las que el blog y sus seguidores le han dado para continuar adelante con una idea de libre expresión tremendamente descabellada en un régimen como el imperante en Cuba, en el que ir en contra de lo que establece la casta dirigente supone, entre otras cosas, encontrarte seguido noche y día por dos miembros de la Policía política del Régimen. La radioactividad es la que parece que emana hacia sus allegados, amigos y conocidos aquél que se enfrenta a lo políticamente establecido, ya que no todo el mundo encuentra el valor suficiente para dar público apoyo en esa Cruzada en pro de la libertad.

    http://www.elimparcial.es/libros/yoani-sanchez-cuba-libre-vivir-y-escribir-en-la-habana-68482.html

  17. Where is the list of code names for the numbers to 100 ?

    Cuba could benefit by imports of pre 1986 US cars. After that they had “computer” controls added and are difficult to maintain.

    Regards, S.

  18. Pingback: Tweets that mention Generation Y » Losing a Tooth, Winning a Number -- Topsy.com

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