The Country of Long Shadows


There are two men on the corner. One is wearing an earphone while the other peers into the door of a building. All the neighbors know perfectly well why they are there. A dissident lives on one of the floors of the building; two members of the political police watch who comes and goes and keep a car nearby to follow him wherever he goes. They don’t try to hide because they want this person, who signs his name to his critical opinions, to know they’re there; they want his friends to distance themselves so as not to end up caught in the network of control, in the spiderweb of vigilance.

It is not an isolated case. Here, every non-conformist has his own shadow — or a whole group of shadows — who follow him around. The so called “securities” also use sophisticated monitoring techniques that range from bugging phone lines and placing microphones in homes, to tracking the location of their targets through signals from their cell phones. The effects on the personal lives of those who suffer these operations are so devastating that we have come to refer to State Security by terrible names such as “The Apparatus,” “The Armageddon,” or “The Crusher.”

But not even these soldiers dressed in civilian clothes can escape popular scorn. Several jokes are making the rounds about the inordinate number of “securities” surrounding each individual opponent. Whispering and looking over their shoulders, many comment sarcastically, “There is so much manpower needed in agriculture, and look at these guys here, spending the whole day watching someone who thinks differently.” Because, indeed, what a contrast it would be if, instead of criminalizing opinion, they devoted themselves to productive labor; if instead of projecting their long shadows over the critics of the system, they let them fall over some lettuce or tomatoes, over the furrows — now empty — that they could help to plant.

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27 thoughts on “The Country of Long Shadows

  1. yoani,lei la noticia sobre lo sucedido en TUNEZ,y dices avisame si el hijo de puta dictador,de tunez aterrisa.Bueno te voy a dar mi opinion al respecto,te acuerdas de ese refran de los cubanos de “cuando veas la barda de tu vecino arder,pon la tuya en remojo”,aunque la politica se vasa como me( ensenaron) de momentos coyunturales,o culturalmente hablando,momentos propicios para que ocurran los hechos,mira hace falta que eso suceda,porque,inteligentemente hablando,matariamos dos pajaros de un solo tiro,aunque creo que los caudillos a pesar de ser impredecibles en su manera de actuar,bien podrian concederle refugio para obtener un poco de dinero que tanta falta les hace,y porque no, quisas los caudillos de la habana le recomienden,al imitador de las america y “revolucionario bolivariano” chavez sirva de anfitrion,de tan semejante calana,quizas si porque chavez con todas sus imitaciones,y sentirse(sin pudor)relevo de las doctrinas de los castros e influyendo sus doctrinas(las ya cacareadas y gastadas la revolucion de los pobres)sobre los paises de america latina,ademas no podemos olvidar que chavez(con su petroleo)a enriquesido su arsenal belico,claro esta,no podemos olvidar que PUTIN,no ha renunciado a su dominio estilo STALINISTA,y pretende oportunamente,una vez mas inclinar su balansa hacia america latina,chavez usando su influencia de ser el segundo abastecedor de petroleo de estados unidos,podria someter a prueba de equilibrio moral a los estados unidos,como?Si chavez da refugio al dictador que ocurriria despues?,no podemos olvidar que iran abrio sus brazos a venezuela, y esta a puesto a iran como unos de sus colaboradores comerciales,en contesto y a grandes rasgos podemos en este caso hacer un pronostico,no pienso que raul castro quiere seguir disfrutando un poco mas de su trono que recien empiesa,no se arresgaria como buen sorro que es no olvida la leccion que les dio RONALD REAGAN en granada en 1983,cuando les corto sus aspiraciones de extender sus tentaculos y raices comunistas,en la isla de granada,por la oportunista idea caudillos,ademas no podemos olvidar los estudios que hiso Jeanne Kirpactrick de los dictadures y sus ideas,si ponemos en contesto todos esos detalles,mas las oportunas y sabias ideas de ese grande de la politica exterior de estados unidos que fue Henry Kissingers,y la inigualable administracion de RONALD REAGAN,llegamos rapidamente a una superficial(pero interesante )conclusion,la pandilla de caudillos en cuba no se atreveria,ademas mi hermana YOANI tu como muchos de nosotros que somos fanaticos de este mundo politico,estamos observando de serca los movimientos de las hienas que avasallan nuestro pais.saludos a las (nuestras madres)damas de blanco,farinas,bicet,reinaldo tu esposo claudia,raudel en fin a todos los que dicen en cuba cojones que malo esta esto.de usa con amor,elio esquivel y de propina les doy ABAJO FIDEL.

  2. REUTERS:U.S. hopeful citizen held in Cuba to be tried, freed-By Esteban Israel-Thu Jan 13

    HAVANA- The United States is cautiously optimistic a U.S. aid contractor held by Cuba on suspicion of spying will be tried and then freed, a U.S. official said on Thursday, raising hopes of an end to a case that has hindered better ties.

    Alan Gross, 62, has been detained for 13 months since he was arrested at his Havana hotel. Authorities accuse him of illegally importing satellite communications equipment and of possibly spying.

    His detention without formal charges or trial has become a serious bone of contention between the two nations, stalling steps to improve relations by the governments of U.S. President Barack Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro.

    The senior State Department official, who asked not to be identified, said the Cuban government now expected Gross to be charged and tried. The official, who spoke following migration talks on Wednesday in Havana between U.S. and Cuban delegations, did not give a time frame.

    “I am cautiously optimistic because of things we hear that that would be the case,” the official said when asked if Gross would be released and sent home after being tried, adding that Cuban officials had made “encouraging noises.”

    The White House pressed again for Gross’ release.

    “We reiterate our call for the immediate release of Alan Gross, who should be allowed to return home to his wife and family,” White House spokesman Mike Hammer said. “U.S. government officials have repeatedly raised our deep concern regarding Mr. Gross with Cuban authorities and have urged all those who interact with the Cuban government to do the same.”

    Roberta Jacobson, the second most senior U.S. diplomat for Latin America, visited Gross in jail on Thursday during her trip to Cuba for the migration talks. State Department spokesman P.J. Crowley said the United States appreciated that she had been able to make the visit. She also met with dissidents, Jewish groups and Catholic Church officials.

    U.S. Democratic Senator Carl Levin also visited Gross during a five-day trip to Cuba and urged Cuban officials to reach a prompt and positive resolution to his situation, a spokeswoman said.

    STUMBLING BLOCK, HEALTH PROBLEMS

    Gross’ detention is among the most serious stumbling blocks to better ties with communist-led Cuba, the U.S. official said.

    A Western diplomat in Havana said on Thursday Gross would likely plead guilty at a trial in the next few weeks and then be sent back to the United States.

    But Cuba called Jacobson’s meeting with opposition leaders an “open provocation” and evidence Washington still aimed to subvert the revolutionary government that took power in 1959.

    “Before the migration talks, the Foreign Ministry made clear to the U.S. officials its rejection of any attempt to use the official visit to Cuba to carry out disrespectful or offensive activities against our country,” the ministry said in a statement.

    Gross, who is being held in a cell at a military hospital, is said to have lost 90 pounds (41 kg) in jail and suffers from health problems. His daughter, in her 20s, was diagnosed with breast cancer after he was detained in December 2009. Gross’ wife wrote last year to Raul Castro expressing her and her husband’s remorse for his work in Cuba.

    Gross’ trip to Cuba was funded by a U.S. program promoting political change on the island. Washington says he was helping Cuba’s Jewish community access the Internet. Cuba says he broke the law and may have been spying during several trips.

    It is believed Cuba would like to trade him for five Cuban agents imprisoned in the United States for spying. Cuba has not confirmed that. The U.S. official said no specific demands had been made but that Cuba wanted an end to aid programs aimed at political change and also raised the issue of the five agents.

    The United States has said it wants Gross freed without conditions on humanitarian grounds and will undertake no new efforts to improve relations until he is released

    Before Gross’ arrest, relations had warmed slightly as Obama eased the 48-year-old U.S. trade embargo against Cuba and the countries began talks on migration and postal services.

    (Additional reporting by Susan Cornwell and Jeff Mason in Washington; Writing by Frank Jack Daniel; Editing by Pascal Fletcher and Peter Cooney)

    http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE70C6D920110114

  3. For the “por las moscas”
    One of the services exported by Cuba, only hte rebolution cadres is intelligenzia.
    To the chinese & other buyers.
    To Venezuela they sell the know how about repression & the defence of a dictatorship, remember barba roja, he was one th ecuban “advisors” in hydroenergy …
    Lets not forget the interrogation advisors exported to some of the arab countries as well as in countries in south america.
    Lastly under the umbrella of the “shadows hides the repressor, the comandante, his brother & all their esbirros.
    Lets not foerget: from the “birth of the rebolution” the executed cubans at the hands of el chancho, or the ones at the hands of raul, how about the executions in la cabana …
    If the rebolution is right why the killings?
    If the rebolution is right why the persecution?
    If the rebolution is right why the intimidation?
    If the rebolution is right why the incarceration of dissidents?
    If the rebolution is right why is there strife in Cuba?
    If the rebolution is right why does it fear open discussion?
    If the rebolution is right why does it fear oposition parties?
    Viva Cuba libre!

  4. U.S. experts on Cuban security agencies agree with the Stasi role in Cuba:

    “East Germany had a major role in building up Cuban counterintelligence as well as its foreign intelligence services, providing training for decades . . . right up to the final days of East Germany,” said Chris Simmon, a career U.S. counterintelligence officer and expert on Cuban intelligence.

    “’The repressive system that existed in East Germany . . . is the same one that exists today in Cuba,” he says. “What MININT learned from the Stasi has not been forgotten.”

  5. Ninguno de esos metodos de persecusion y vigilancia es estrano para nosotros(mi difunta madre decia,ustedes los opositores siempre van a tener cola,porque ustedes,le han quitado la mascara al moustro),recuerdo en los dias antes de salir de cuba,tenia que ir muy seguido a casa de arcos bernes,y despues regresar a casa de oscar pena el segundo de los derechos humanos, en guanabo donde yo vivia,en muchas ocasiones oscar me preguntaba que vistes en la esquina,le decia lo mismo un perro dentro de un carro con los equipo de escucha activados,el pequeno radal enforma de satelite apuntando hacia casa de oscar,para saber que hablabamos,oscar le decia,devuelvalen el carro a abrahante en aquel entonces castro todavia no lo habia sacado de circulacion,oscar me contaba que lo amenasaban,porque la maquina de escribir de el no paraba de hacerlo en las noches,a nosotros nada nos es sorpresa porque son ellos quien nos perseguian.cuando el comandante ramon guin hiba a mi casa o saliamos juntos a caminar era lo mismo,me decia cuantos perros tenemos detras y le respondia varios gastando la gasolina del pueblo,al igual cuando los hechos de la embajada de francia y mi intento por tirar la propaganda en la ciudad deportiva dia 4 de julio 1989, ese mismo dia la seguridad del estado interrogaba a mi difunta madre en pinar del rio,mientras yo me preparaba para lo que hiba hacer esa noche con la propaganda,yo y mi amigisocarras visitabamos reuter en el vedado,queriamos que la prensa extranjera cubriera lo que haciamos,despues de los hechos,supimos que la secretaria del director de prensa de reuters en la havana era chilena i trabajaba para la seguridad del estado cubano,porque?,por que solo ella sabia lo que hibamos hacer,nos ofrecio te,y nos dijo no se preocupen,alli estara el director de prensa viendolo todo,resultado,fui arrestado poe la seguridad del estado,y llevado al hospital fajardo,me interrogaron toda la noche,por dos dias,despues me llevaron a villa marista,para que firmara mi renuncia como activista de los derechos humanos,por supuesto que no la firme,senores que sorpresa recibi, porque de la oficina continu asacaron a mi hermana teresita como testigo de que no me habian torturaro,les dije ella no es politica,elio

  6. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE PRESS RELEASE: Cuba Migration Talks
    Press Statement
    Philip J. Crowley
    Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Public Affairs
    Washington, DC-January 12, 2011

    On Wednesday, January 12, 2011, the United States and Cuba met in Havana, Cuba to discuss the implementation of the U.S.-Cuba Migration Accords. This was the fourth such meeting since the resumption of the Cuba Migration Talks in 2009. In the course of the meeting, the U.S. team, led by Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs Roberta Jacobson, reaffirmed the U.S. commitment to promote safe, legal, and orderly migration. The Cuban delegation was led by Vice Foreign Minister Dagoberto Rodriguez Barrera.

    As U.S. officials have consistently done, the U.S. delegation raised the case of Alan Gross, the U.S. citizen detained in Cuba since December 3, 2009, and called for his immediate release.

    The agenda for the talks reflected longstanding U.S. priorities on Cuba migration issues. The U.S. delegation highlighted areas of successful cooperation in migration, while also identifying issues that have been obstacles to the full implementation of the Accords. Engaging in these talks underscores our interest in pursuing constructive discussions with the Government of Cuba to advance U.S. interests.

    http://www.state.gov/r/pa/prs/ps/2011/01/154565.htm

  7. The chosen ideology of a totalitarian system is but a convenient mask. Ideological arguments and self-serving populism are but cynical tools to take in the uninformed,the naive and the desperate. Dictators are not in the business of self-justification or proving ideological purity. They are in the business of usurping and holding on to power. The repressive mechanism is in place for the purposes of self-perpetuation … nothing more.

  8. It always amazes me … totalitarian regimes need their “shadow” apparatus in the guise of safety & security for the people they opress.
    Part of their mere existence & survival depends on it.
    If their political views & reason to exist is so right, why is there a need for it?
    Why control, dominate & atempt to eliminate any & all oposition?
    If the rulers of Cuba are so right why not let the people be free to express their disagreements & opossition without fear of retribution of any kind …
    The shadow, one of the many legacies the argentinian “el chancho” left us with.
    Perhaps even he became the “shadows’s” victim, remember: this “rebolution” as meny other revolutions tends to eat their own.

  9. Let’s hope the Stasi were equally successful in instilling their penchant for meticulous record keeping upon the castro security apparatus. When the criminal castro government finally falls by the wayside those records will help to bring to account those major and minor players that are responsible for the 50+ year atrocity. The records might help to bring about a Cuban version of the Nuremberg trials. Bringing the thugs to account would provide for a much needed cathartic event, especially if it ends with some of them at the end of a rope or more appropriately on the receiving end of a firing squad (paredon).

  10. The Stasi taught the Cubans how to bug tourist hotel rooms, how to mount effective camera and wiretap systems for eavesdropping, delivered one-way mirrors used for interrogations and provided equipment to fabricate masks, mustaches and other forms of makeup, provided computers and introduced new archiving methods that better organized, protected and sped up the Cubans’ processing of security information.

  11. AS WE SAY IN CUBA “ESTO ES EL COLMO” (This Takes The Cake)! ITS THE CASTROFACIST’S INCOMPETENCE, CONTROL, STUPIDITY, COMEMIERDERIA AND EGOS THAT IS THE REAL REASON FOR IMIGRATION!

    “Cuba complains that Washington’s “wet foot, dry foot” policy – which grants residence to Cuban migrants who touch U.S. soil and mandates repatriation for those intercepted at sea – encourages illegal emigration from the island.”

    FOX NEWS LATINO: U.S. relations with Cuba hobbled by detention of contractor-January 13

    Santiago – The United States finds it “very difficult to advance on matters of common interest” with Cuba while President Raul Castro’s government continues to hold a U.S. government contractor Havana labels a spy, Washington’s top diplomat for Latin America said here Wednesday.

    Alan Gross has been in Cuban custody since December 2009 despite the absence of formal charges against him, Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs Arturo Valenzuela said during an official visit to Chile.

    Gross, 60, works for a Maryland company hired by the U.S. Agency for International Development to promote democracy in communist Cuba.

    The State Department said he was detained while distributing laptop computers, mobile phones and other communications equipment among the Jewish community on the island, but the Cuban government claims he was aiding dissidents.

    Addressing relations with Cuba, Valenzuela told a press conference at the U.S. Embassy in Santiago that while pleased with Castro’s decision to free dozens of political prisoners, President Barack Obama’s administration regrets the dissidents were forced to accept exile in Spain.

    The assistant secretary also noted that a senior State Department official is in Cuba this week for the latest round in bilateral talks on migration.

    Cuba complains that Washington’s “wet foot, dry foot” policy – which grants residence to Cuban migrants who touch U.S. soil and mandates repatriation for those intercepted at sea – encourages illegal emigration from the island.

    The United States, conversely, says Cuba’s poor economy and lack of freedom are to blame.

    Asked about the Castro government’s recent moves to expand the scope for self-employment and small business in Cuba, Valenzuela said U.S. officials are “very conscious of the economic changes that could lead to a certain liberalization.”

    The Chilean-born U.S. official met here Wednesday with Chile’s foreign minister, Alfredo Moreno, to discuss bilateral and regional issues.

    http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/politics/2011/01/13/relations-cuba-hobbled-detention-contractor/

  12. In 1940, Cuba had free and fair elections. Batista, endorsed by Communists, won the election. Communists attacked the anti-Batista opposition, saying that Ramón Grau and others were “fascists”, “reactionaries”, and “Trotskyists.” The 1940 Constitution, which Julia E. Sweig describes as extraordinarily progressivist, was adopted by Batista administration. Batista was voted out of office in 1944 elections.

    Batista was succeeded by Dr. Ramón Grau San Martín in 1944, a populist physician, who had briefly held the presidency in the 1933 revolutionary process. President Grau made a deal with labor union to continue Batista’s pro-labour policies. Grau’s administration coincided with the end of World War II, and he inherited an economic boom as sugar production and prices rose. He inaugurated a program of public works and school construction. Social security benefits were increased, and economic development and agricultural production were encouraged. But increased prosperity brought increased corruption. Nepotism and favoritism flourished, and urban violence, a legacy of the early 1930s, reappeared now with tragic proportions. The country was also steadily gaining a reputation as a base for organized crime, with the Havana Conference of 1946 seeing leading Mafia mobsters descend upon the city.

    Grau was followed by Carlos Prío Socarrás, also elected democratically, but whose government was tainted by increasing corruption and violent incidents among political factions. Around the same time Fidel Castro had become a public figure at the University of Havana. Eduardo Chibás was the leader of the Partido Ortodoxo (Orthodox Party), a liberal democratic group, who was widely expected to win in 1952 on an anticorruption platform. Chibás committed suicide before he could run for the presidency, and the opposition was left without its major leader.

    Taking advantage of the opportunity, Batista, who was running for president in the 1952 elections, but was only expected to get a small minority of votes, seized power in an almost bloodless coup three months before the election was to take place. President Prío did nothing to stop the coup, and was forced to leave the island. Due to the corruption of the past two administrations, the general public reaction to the coup was somewhat accepting at first. However, Batista soon encountered stiff opposition when he temporarily suspended the balloting and the constitution, and attempted to rule by decree. Elections were held in 1953 and Batista was elected. Opposition parties mounted a blistering campaign, and continued to do so, using the Cuban free press during all of Batista’s tenure in office. Although Batista was intent on lining his pockets, Cuba did flourish economically during his regime.

    Cuba’s wages were among the world’s highest. According to International Labor Organization, the average industrial salary in Cuba was the world’s 8th highest in 1958. The average agricultural wages were higher than in Denmark, West Germany, Belgium, or France. Although a third of the population still lived in poverty, Cuba was one of the five most developed countries in Latin America. Only 44% of the population was rural.

    Gross domestic product per capita was already about equal to Italy and significantly higher than that of countries such as Japan, although 1/6 of the US. According to the United Nations at the time, “one feature of the Cuban social structure is a large middle class.” Eight-hour day had been established in 1933, long before other countries. Cuba had a months’s paid holiday, nine days’ sick leave with pay, six weeks’ holiday before and after childbirth.

    Cuba had Latin America’s highest per capita consumption rates of meat, vegetables, cereals, automobiles, telephones and radios. Televisions per capita was the fifth highest in the world. Despite small size, it had the world’s 8th highest number of radio stations (160). According to the United Nations, Cubans read 58 daily newspapers during the late 1950s, only behind three much more populous countries: Brazil, Argentina and Mexico. People migrated to Havana at fast pace. Havana was the world’s fourth most expensive city. Havana had more cinemas than New York.

    Cuba had one of the highest numbers of doctors per capita – more than in the United Kingdom. The mortality rate was the third lowest in the world. According to the World Health Organization, the island had the lowest infant mortality rate of Latin America and the 13th lowest in the world – better than in France, Belgium, West Germany, Israel, Japan, Austria, Italy, Spain, and Portugal. Cuba had the highest rates of education spending in Latin America. Cuba had the 4th highest literacy in the region at almost 80% according to the United Nations, higher than in Spain. Economy could not always keep up with demand. Cuba had already the highest telephone penetration in Latin America – but thousands were still waiting, which caused frustration.

  13. AFP: Fate of US ‘spy’ key in US-Cuba migration talks
    HAVANA — Cuban and US negotiators met Wednesday for a new round of migration talks, with the fate of an imprisoned US contractor who Havana says is a spy a top agenda issue.

    Washington is protesting Cuba’s holding of American Alan Gross, detained in December 2009 while reportedly distributing cell phones, laptops and other communications equipment to Jewish groups in Cuba.

    According to Cuban officials, Gross was a US “secret agent” who was distributing “sophisticated communication equipment” to regime opponents.

    Washington and Havana have no diplomatic relations, but they consult on issues such as drug trafficking and illegal immigration. The last round of such talks was held June 18 in Washington.

    US officials say Gross worked for a non-government organization contracted by the State Department to supply computer and communications equipment to civil society groups in Cuba.

    Washington has made it “very clear” to Havana that it will be difficult to reach any major agreements as long as Cuba is holding Gross, Arturo Valenzuela, the most senior US State Department official for Latin America, said recently.

    “The case is important for us,” emphasized a spokesperson from the US Interest Section in Havana, speaking in Spanish.

    While Gross, 61, has been in prison for more than a year, he has yet to face formal espionage charges, the US official said.

    In December the head of Cuba’s legislature, Ricardo Alarcon, said Gross “violated national sovereignty,” and that his case was being handled “in an adequate manner” in accordance with Cuban law.

    The US delegation at the talks is headed by Deputy US Assistant Secretary of State Roberta Jacobson, while Cuba is represented by Deputy Foreign Minister Dagoberto Rodriguez, officials said.

    The talks take place as Cuban-born former CIA agent Luis Posada Carriles — wanted in Venezuela and Cuba for several deadly bombings — is on trial in Texas on charges he lied to US immigration officials in 2005.

    Havana believes that Posada Carriles, 82, faces immigration charges because Washington does not want him to face terrorism charges.

    Despite the underlying bitterness, the migration talks are one of the few direct contacts between Havana and Washington.

    Talks had been conducted every two years, but broke down in 2003 under then-president George W. Bush.

    Since taking office in early 2009 the Obama administration has held talks with Havana on issues like migration, mail exchanges, quake relief for Haiti and the Gulf of Mexico oil spill.

    Immigration is a thorny issue between the two countries, which have had no formal diplomatic ties since 1961.

    Cuba seeks to stem persistent illegal US-bound emigration of its nationals across the shark-infested Florida Straits.

    Havana accuses Washington of encouraging Cubans to leave the island through a 1966 measure that grants them automatic US residency if they reach US soil.

    Washington in turn says Cubans want to flee the island seeking personal freedom and better economic opportunities.

    http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5h4w1Y0bNxPTjipETns7LSzAJQlJA?docId=CNG.9cf08371e3c2861766aa55487400945a.2c1

  14. CUANTO SUFRIMIENTO HEMOS TENIDO QUE SOPORTAR,CUANTO DOLOR LLEVAMOS EN NUETRAS ALMAS,CUANTAS PERDIDAS FAMILIARES Y SIN TAN SIQUIERA UNA LAGRIMA CERCANA ALA PERDIDA DENUESTROS MEJORES SERES QUERIDOS.ME PREGUNTO DESPUES DE TODO SI VALE O VALIO LA PENA TANTAS PERDIDAS EL DOLOR QUE LE CAUSAMOS PRINCIPALMENTE A NUESTRAS MADRES,PORQUE ELLAS FUERON NUESTRO MEJORES ALIADOS,NUESTROS MEJORES AMIGOS,NUETROS MEJORES CONFIDENTES,NUESTROS MEJORES Y FIELES GUARDAESPALDAS.SOY DE LA OPINION QUE NUESTRA MADRES LUCHABAN TAMBIEN JUNTO A NOSOTROS EN CONTRA DE LA DICTADURA,SOLO QUE ELLA LO HACIAN,DESDE EL SILENCIO Y SUFRIR QUE SOLO ESE SER QUE NUNCA NOS ABANDONA,Y NOS CUIDA Y LLORA EN SILENCIO . TE QUIERO MADRE. ELIO

  15. COMO DIRIA JOSE MARTI EL APOSTO DE CUBA CUANDO SE ENCONTRABA EN TRABAJO FORZADO EN LAS CANTERAS DE SAN LAZARO: MIRAME MADRE Y POR TU AMOR NO LLORES SI ESCLAVO DE MI EDAD Y MIS DOCTRINAS TU MARTIR CORAZON LLENE DE ESPINAS PIENSA QUE ENTRE ESPINAS NACEN FLORES. JOSE MARTI.

  16. YOANI,EN ESTE MENSAJE QUIERO EXPRESARLE A TU ESPOSO REINALDO ESCOBAR MIS MAS SENTIDOS PESAMES POR LA PERDIDA FISICA DE SU QUERIDA E INCOMPARABLE MADRE,RECIBAN TODOS SUS FAMILIARES UN SENTIDO PESAME EN NOMBRE DE MI HIJA VANESSA ESQUIVEL Y EN NOMBRE MIO UN ABRASO A ESE GRAN HIJO QUE ES REINALDO.YO DESDE AQUI DESDE EL DESTIERRO TENGO EL DOLOR DE TAMBIEN HABER PERDIDO A MI MADRE,SIN UN BESO Y UNA FLOR DE DESPEDIDA TAMBIEN FUE SEPULTADA MI MADRE,SOLO POR CARTAS DE MI HIJA YUDAISY,SUPE DE LANOTICIAS,MI MADRE EN SUS ULTIMOS MOMENTOS CLAMABA POR SU HIJO EN EL DESTIERRO,YO CONSIDERO A REINALDO POR TAN INSUSTITUIBLE PERDIDA,.CON RESPETO PONGAN EN LA TUMBA DE LA MAMA DE REINALDO UNA FLOR EN NOMBRE DE TODOS LOS PRESOS POLITICOS. QUE DIOS LA TENGA EN LA GLORIA.HERMANO REINALDO TE ACOMPANO EN TUS SENTIMIENTO. MIS RESPETOS ELIO ESQUIVEL.

  17. I still say there is more fear in the lives of the castros & their babosos.
    Who to trust? which of their companeros will take power away from them? where is the next revolution come from?
    What will happen to their families, their spoiled children much like Saddam’s & perhaps to end in the same manner
    Their fear is not like ours, theirs is the fear of what justice will bring to their lives & their memory, while hounded by the companeros they betrayed, the ones they killed & their families still alive.
    Revange does not have to be violent … the time it takes to get there is what feeds the fear & paranoia.
    They feel it, they fear it…
    Viva Cuba!!!

  18. With changes being made by Raul, the one change that they have not dared to make, is to remove fear from Cuban life, because it is the glue that holds together their government. Fear of being accused by a neighbor who belongs to one of the vigilante Committees for the Defense of the Revolution; fear that the secret police will find something to incriminate you; fear that you will be jailed without charges for months or even years; fear that the government-sponsored mobs called Rapid Response Brigades will stage a violent rejection rally in front of your house; fear that you will be denied your request to travel abroad; fear that you will lose your job; fear, in short, that the long arm of power will reach down to you. This fear will forever restrict progress in Cuba.

  19. The place where repression moves most confortably … the shadows.
    Feeding the fear w/intimidation the rulers feel it as much as the people does.
    The paranoia generated to keep power.
    Perhaps the dogs will turn on the master when their life is threatened.
    Nevertheless, the state of fear is nothing new, not even the technics have changed much.

  20. I wonder what would happen if Yoani tried to engage these “shadows” by having a little fun with them. I think she has done it before. I know she has the wits and humor to reach their frontal lobe and make them think just a little. If the shadows could just get past their simple reptilian fight or flight thinking, whatever imagination and trickle of independent thinking they have left could be stimulated. I’m sure they’d probably answer with short, rehearsed bursts of threats, but when they leave their shifts and go home, at night they might just reflect on their lives and the absurdity of following a group of senile and incompentent leaders.

    Yoani might remind them that their boring jobs are demonstrably not assured, beyond just a few years at most. She could show them that they are at risk, perhaps by showing them factual information as to what has happened to people in secret services that went too far and are caught and brought to justice in places like Germany, Poland, etc.

  21. Hundreds of East German government documents on Stasi relations with Cuba’s own feared Ministry of the Interior, known as MININT , has been found in the Stasi archives.

    The MININT is ”almost a carbon copy” of the repressive Stasi security system, exported by East Germany to Cuba in the 1970s and ’80s, and that the ties between the two organizations run far deeper than previously known.

  22. Damir, as much as I disagree with the Patriot Act, it’s intention is to prevent terrorism. The intention of state security in Cuba is to prevent anyone from disagreeing with the government. There’s a huge difference which you fail to see in your never ending paranoid conspiracy baloney which you are constantly spewing. You are obviously completely out of touch with reality, a legend in your own mind, and I only occasionally read your comments for the sole purpose of having a good laugh.

  23. GET YOUR HANDKERSHIFS OUT!! THIS IS A CUBAN STORY! THESE TEENAGE BASEBALL PLAYERS WILL MAKE YOU SMILE AND CRY AT THE SAME TIME!
    YOUTUBE: Peloteros cubanos llegan a Miami – Parte II
    Cuban Baseball Players Flee Cuba- .

    Yasiel Balaguer, a 17-year-old center fielder considered one of the top prospects in Cuba, has defected to Nicaragua in order to become a free agent and sign with an MLB team, according to Jorge Ebro of El Nuevo Herald.

    Ebro reports that Balaguer is now being represented by the Miami Sports agency and calls him “a natural leadoff batter and an explosive baserunner” who “is an extraordinary defensive player because of his arm.”

    Baseball America‘s reports on Balaguer are far less glowing, but he’s definitely viewed as a legitimate prospect.

    Jose Iglesias and Noel Arguelles defected from Cuba as teenagers last year, with Iglesias joining the Red Sox for $8.25 million and Arguelles getting $7 million from the Royals.

  24. So how many of the snitches are going to get “layoff notices” this year as the regime gets rid of unproductive labor? One has to wonder. My guess as this period continues and the population becomes even more restless and dissatisfied they’ll have to hire even more. Another “Mariel” waiting to happen.

  25. ***
    HI DAMIR–#1. You’re off your meds again. Cuba is the local GULAG–not the U.S.A. But you and the evil drug crazed murderer in Tucson think the same way. Both of you live in an unreal world. Can you say PARANOIA? Free Cuba!
    ***
    HOLA DAMIR–#1. Estas faltando sus medicinas otra vez. Cuba es el GULAG local–no los Estados Unidos. Pero tu y el malo matador endrogado en Tucson piensan en el mismo modo. Viven en un mundo que no es real. Puedes decir PARANOIA? Cuba Libre!
    ***
    John Bibb
    ***

  26. Yeah, the description is that of the team “yoani’s” new, foreign masters: the usa.

    Just one glance over the “patriot act” law and you will see where the people really fear for themselves.

    Better yet just open this morning’s newspaper or TV and watch more news about the massacre in the usa. Six people killed, a 9 year old girl among them, in anunprovoked attack on a democrat member of Congress.

    Some democracy the team “yoani” are after…

    In the meantime cia freely and unpunished continues to buy and sell heroine and cocaine, under direct control and blessing from the government that is supposedly all for democracy and against the drug traficking:

    http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=cia+illegal+drug+trafficking&aq=f

    There goes your “some kind of pragmatic capitalism”!

    Vote for “yoani” is a vote for criminals. Nothing would be better under their “pragmatic capitalism” for the people. The history teaches us (10 000 years of recorded history, mind you) that those who trumpet themself to be defenders of people’s interests, always, and without fail end up draining the people just as their predecessors.

    Remember the saying: “On the East same old stories, on the West nothing new.”?

    That is the team “yoani”.

    Believe to your own peril.

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