And My 10% of Affection?


On Monday, all the currency exchanges in the country had a very busy day. The one closest to my house opened up with a line of fifty people who rebuked the clerk. The news that parity was being restored between the Cuban convertible peso and the United States dollar had been announced on the early edition of the morning news. With a lot of journalistic awkwardness, rather than simply stating in plain language what the change consisted of, the presenters read the resolution — technical language and all — as it had been published in the Official Gazette. By the end, few knew for sure the current value of those greenbacks that come from the North. Even so, thousands of people descended on banks and currency kiosks to exchange money with the faces of Lincoln, Franklin or Washington.

The day was marked by frustration because there were those who had the illusion that they would also narrow the distance between “national money” — in which salaries are paid — and the other currency, the Cuban convertible peso, known as the chavito and indispensable for acquiring the greater part of what we need. But no, the measure consisted solely of devaluing the convertible peso by 8% with relation to the US dollar. The word “parity” generated great confusion because the annoyed customers found it difficult to understand that there is still a 10% exchange fee to turn dollars into cash. In this way the government hopes to stimulate the movement of dollars into banking channels, while continuing to penalize dollars that come into the country in a personal way, in many cases brought in by so-called “mules.” The banking adjustments are needed and urgent, as the adopted resolution is like a drop in the ocean of the absurd monetary system’s needed repairs. The pace of these measures is drowning us; the timidity eating away at our pockets.

Thus, in the line at my neighborhood currency exchange, two days ago, the discomfort was evident and even led to altercations among those waiting. The climax came when an old woman received about 87 centavos for each dollar exchanged. “My son works hard to send this money and look what they turn it into,” she said. A Party activist also waiting to exchange “enemy” money admonished her not to complain so much, because in the end she was privileged, having the good luck to receive remittances from abroad. He told her, “The least you can do is give 10% to the country which needs it.” The lady retorted quickly and so accurately that everyone fell silent, “Yes, indeed, I receive help from abroad, but every day I suffer the absence of my children. Is the country going to give me 10% more affection?” The line dissolved in couple of minutes.

Advertisements

37 thoughts on “And My 10% of Affection?

  1. Yoani Sanchez, you are full of it.

    Reasons why there is a 10% exchange fee to turn dollars into cash:

    1) Washington fines Swiss bank for violating blockade of Cuba
    http://www.thewestindiannews.com/washington-fines-swiss-bank-for-violating-blockade-of-cuba/

    2) The 10% is a compensation for the costs and risks caused by the economic, financial and commercial blockade imposed on Cuba by the United States government for more than 50 years.

    http://www.businessinsider.com/cubas-central-bank-devalues-convertible-peso-to-match-the-dollar-2011-3#ixzz1JQrrm6R6

    Do you now understand why?

  2. @#34
    your words makes you a lier doing it(commenting) for your own personal interests …
    Nevertheless, you continue to exercise your right of freedom of expression …

  3. Damir,

    democracy, equality, liberty, are ideals that are worth struggling for even if their promises have yet to be fulfilled. I might not like my minimum-wage job or being unemployed, but it’s better than working as a slave in a Roman-empire salt mine, or as a slave in Stalin’s gulag, or Castro’s for that matter, and I’m better off than even a middle-class American of 50 years ago. If it weren’t for people struggling for those ideals, where would we all be? The world goes back and forth, and in circles, we make progress in some areas and not others, but without those ideals we would only go backwards.

    Despite what you think, Yoani is part of that struggle. Even if you hate capitalism and the USA, equality means you have to respect the right of Cubans to choose capitalism and a pro-American government. Just as I respect your right to speak against and vote against capitalism and the USA.

  4. I find it disappointing that so many people swear by democracy, yet are blind to the fact that there is no democracy in the world. Humans lie, and they do that out of their personal interests. Altruists are rare and usually impotent (politically speaking, get your minds out of that “democratic” gutter).

    Recent disintegration of that “democracy” and capitalism have clearly shown what is that builds these two hollow concepts. Obama gave a hard promise that the first thing he would do as a president would to close the concentration camp in Guantanamo. Not only he didn’t, there has never been more prisoners there than today. And more are coming on a dauly basis.

    And remember that forrest gump did use Lybian prisons for torturing captured muslims.

    With Cuba, thanks to all the “well-wishing” “democrats” with no grasp of the concept, only more of teh same imperialist violence can happen. It has been 10 years since occupation of Afhanistan, and how did that go? Iraq is still a war zone too. How come? Where are those herds of democrats ready to transform their countries into paradises on earth?

    Never existed. Just like in Cuba.

    Just a different handful of power-hungry primitives looking for their turn to kill at will. Posts on this site sadly confirm this to be the future Cubans can expect.

    The team “yoani” have abundantly demonstrated that that is exactly who they are. Their “job opportunities in Cuba “pages” are full of russian and mexican mafia ads, they advertise “people “selling” their apartments and houses when that is illegal in Cuba still, and they are excellent censors of what can and cannot go here.

    Just as they will when they grab the power from their idols, the Castros.

  5. Diego said- “..the site to the sloganisers and the equally mindless pasters of slabs of other (often quite repetitive) material.”

    Diego I will take that as a BIG COMPLIMENT! See you in your next “INCARNATION”!

  6. “have fun in the cesspit” Thanks, I’ll have fun in the cesspit of freedom and equality. I find the courage and integrity of the Cuban dissidents quite inspiring.

    I did try to politely explain the article and the situation in Cuba to you, but have fun on your intellectually rigorous journey of insulting anyone or anything you can’t understand.

  7. #28 good to see you have such a clear understanding of what I wrote in #25.

    I can readily see why anyone interesting in intellectual rigour quickly leave the site to the sloganisers and the equally mindless pasters of slabs of other (often quite repetitive) material.
    Have fun in the cesspit. It must be very comforting. Bye.

  8. Dr. Damir Matulovic, what sort of doctor are you? Just curious. You seem to just spin stories without regard to facts and get very emotional when writing about Yoani. It seems all celebrities have their stalkers these days, just hope you’re not as nuts as Lee Harvey Oswald.

  9. Diego, Yoani is simply writing about the reality of Cuba. In Cuba, people hate giving 10% of their US dollars to the government they hate. It doesn’t matter to them what the government took in the past, they hate the government for forcing their children overseas and to add to the insult, robbing their children of 10% of their income

    The reason the Cuban communist is a hypocrite is because he is living off of US dollars. All their anti-American rhetoric and “be like Che” and “sacrifice” vows mean nothing. Because he receives US dollars he will be among the privileged class in Cuba, and as Yoani and I and anyone who has lived in Cuba knows, the communist will not be sharing his fortune with the Cuban poor. If Mother Theresa belonged to a Satan worship circle but criticized Satanism in the press, and had millions of dollars in the bank and refused to give any to the poor but then claimed in the press that she did, then she would have been a hypocrite like the party activist is. I should point out that many Cuban communists don’t and never have believed in the system and never would have stooped to criticizing the old lady in the line.

  10. Let me address this stupid article, not that I am expecting anything intelligent from the team “yoani” given their past record and lying achievements, for that now legendary ignorance these naive team “yoani” people seem to only be able to display.

    There is a large number of countries in the world that does exactly the same thing. Majority of them are capitalist countries. One such country is, let us go to a good friend of usa dictatorship, Colombia.

    The only two currenices that Colombians are paid roughly what they are worth are the usa dollar and euro. Interestingly, Colombian capitalist government also taxes us dollar with a 10% “commission”, just as Cuban government does.

    But, reading this vomit here, by the team “yoani” I cannot shake off a feeling that in Colombia that is okay. It is only Cuba that always gets a bad wrap by the jinetera paid by her white gods to bull here 24/7… Sounds familiar? Think about the Lybian rebel leader who is righ now bombing Benghazi and his “western democratic” friends are still accusing gadaffi for the bombs falling on civilians in the city.

    Back to the money. Should you be misinformed and come from Canada, Australia or Japan, with respective currency, you will receive only 60% -70% of your currency market value.

    Colombian capitalist market will steal from you 30% to 50% just because these currencies are “in little demand in Colombia”.

    Move on.

    Another of such capitalist countries, another usa-sympathetic government: Chile.

    If you come with usa dollars, or euro, or any other hard currency, as these impotent capitalists like to call their money, since nothing else seems to be hard any more, you will lose 10% to 12% in currency exchange. And of course there’s the tax to pay too, another 2-3%.

    SO to regurgitate about the 10% paid in us dollars being a theft is just a political pamflet of a person intellectualy rather disabled.

    Here’s a simple solution for the team “yoani”: quit talking puke and start asking intelligent people what would be a good thing to do?

    I’ll tell you what would be a good thing to do. To tell all those idiots (stupid obvoiusly, being cubanitos imigrantes, beach thieves in Miami) to send to their families EUROS instead of usa dollars, which are quite worthless nowadays anyway.

    That way these beach thieves will absorb the loss, and their families in Cuba would not have to lose those pitiful 10% over which the team “yoani” is pouring crocodile tears instead of doing something smart.

    Smart being: what I just said above.

    Pitiful losers with no brain and a lot of manure in the skulls.

  11. Here we go again. Al Qhaeda destroying another country, and the “western democracy” siding with them, for their own purposes. Al Jazeera reporting right now that a plane is bombing Benghazi. The reporter, who is British by the way, confirming that their car was blown apart in front of them. Then the plane returned and exploded in the air. “It could only be Gadaffi’s plane”, concluded the British reporter. Five minutes later, rebel leader confirmed that it was THEIR plane the plane that had exploded.

    Yet, everyone is STILL reporting that Gadaffi is bombing Benghazi…

    Be warry of those pesky mother cluckers “democrats” fighting for your right. Those bombs falling on your head are most likely their bombs.

    Be careful what you wish for because you WILL get it.

    All of it.

    And you will be sorry for being stupid, but it will be too late.

  12. #22 “The party activist should be able to access capitalist dollars, just shouldn’t be a hypocrite about it if he wants a bit of respect. ”
    How was he being hypocritical? I thought he like I understood why the 10% penalty ONLY applies to US cash. Nor does it does apply to money sent from the USA via Western Union.

    “Yoani didn’t say he lives off of capitalist dollars, I did.”
    Yes I know I was being ironic.

    #23 “If you think Cubans shouldn’t complain about their government, then by the same logic………”
    What did I write that lead you to that illogic and inaccurate conclusion?

    “I should add, Diego, that every Cuban I’ve ever met only survives thanks to capitalism. Money from capitalist families and friends, money from capitalist tourists, money from the black market (capitalism), begging money from fellow Cubans who receive US dollars, etc.” and of course from legal private enterprise. Cuba has never been a Communist state where there is no legal private enterprise and it is rapidly becoming even less so. Something which will cause additional stressors for those who until now have largely relied on free or subsidised services and goods.

    And I’m still pondering whether Sanchez or others here think that the 8% devaluation was a good thing as the whole focus seems to be on the 10% which still apllies (only) to USD cash?

    Or indeed the irony that many products which are imported (a large number) will now be more expensive in Cuba as their costs to Cuba will increase as a result of the devaluation of the CUC.

  13. I forgot to mention, look up the definitions for the word “irony” and you’ll understand the irony of communists living off of capitalism, and if that escapes you, the irony of anti-American communists craving and living off of the US dollar.

  14. I should add, Diego, that every Cuban I’ve ever met only survives thanks to capitalism. Money from capitalist families and friends, money from capitalist tourists, money from the black market (capitalism), begging money from fellow Cubans who receive US dollars, etc. If you think Cubans shouldn’t complain about their government, then by the same logic, the Haitians shouldn’t complain about theirs, and certainly we shouldn’t complain about the American or British government.

  15. I don’t understand your point Diego. The Cuban government is taking off 10%, not the American. But I guess you blame the American government, and I respect your opinion. In any case, Cuban people are not happy about it and almost all of them blame the Cuban government, not the American, and that’s what Yoani was talking about. She just describes reality, that’s all.

    The party activist should be able to access capitalist dollars, just shouldn’t be a hypocrite about it if he wants a bit of respect. Yoani didn’t say he lives off of capitalist dollars, I did. Every communist I’ve ever met in Cuba lives off of capitalist dollars or the huge black market created by capitalist dollars and workplace theft. Because of their connections and positions, communists benefit the most from foreign capitalist aid, as they did with Soviet aid. I would assume you know this because you have family in Cuba you are sending money to?

  16. #15 to continue to use the word wrongly as you do – don’t you see the IRONY that the only currency in the whole world that the 10% applies is that of the USA. The USA is only country that does not allow its citizens to send money to Cuba via their normal credit card or savings accounts. I regularly send money electronically to my family in Cuba from the UK and it costs me no additional fees and there is no 10% penalty.
    That is ironic no?
    What came first the embargo or the 10% penalty?

    Why shouldn’t the party activist access be able to access foreign funds? Can’t find the sentence that says he ” lives of(f?) capitalist dollars” though.

  17. #16 what you wrote doesn’t make much sense or at least to me. Was it initially written in another language?
    Which statement of mine was not in your words “legitimate”?
    And I am still unclear whether you or any of the few people who frequent this site think that the 8% devaluation was a good thing or not?

  18. My prior comments were in no way defending any of castros minions that frequently show up here to lie, misrepresent and apologize for the criminal regime. I know most of you understand that but there are some in here, those I described in my prior post, that will twist my words.

  19. Here we go again, another contributor has decided he should moderate the blog and set the tone for how everyone should think and express themselves, even going to the lengths of giving us guidelines on what is appropriate thinking and form of expression. The arrogance doesn’t end there, we are also told that if we don’t express ourselves in a manner that meets his criteria we must be part of the revolution’s brigade. This of course is nothing but self-serving pseudo-intellectual bs. In the last couple of years when I was at first only reading and later contributing to the blog, there have been attempts by other contributors to moderate the blog using the same disingenuous arguments. The other contributors who I will not name but they know who they are, used the same self-serving arguments and justifications, a kind of “if you aren’t with me you are against me” argument. This of course is unacceptable to those of us that grew up in societies where freedom of thought and expression are not only rights but where the expression of disagreement is encouraged. Some of the contributors to this blog don’t seem to understand that concept. While we may agree in general about what we want for Cuba, we do not need to agree on one common position, approach, method or means of expression. We will not be straight-jacketed in any way when it comes to expression. Unanimity of thought and expression was what was ingrained in castro’s schools. Some of you who were brainwashed as little pioneros with the all encompassing mandate for unanimity seem to still be contaminated with that kind of thinking. Yes, disagreement is sometimes unpleasant and nasty but it is a healthy manifestation of truly free societies.
    This is a concept that some Cubans outside of Cuba have yet to grasp (and probably never will), and that we hope will someday be intrinsic in a free and democratic Cuba.

  20. Here we go again, another contributor has decided he should moderate the blog and set the tone for how everyone should think and express themselves, even going to the lengths of giving us guidelines on what is appropriate thinking and form of expression. The arrogance doesn’t end there, we are also told that if we don’t express ourselves in a manner that meets his criteria we must be part of the revolution’s brigade. This of course is nothing but self-serving pseudo-intellectual b*llsh*t. In the last couple of years when I was at first only reading and later contributing to the blog, there have been attempts by other contributors to moderate the blog using the same disingenuous arguments. The other contributors who I will not name but they know who they are, used the same self-serving arguments and justifications, a kind of “if you aren’t with me you are against me” argument. This of course is unacceptable to those of us that grew up in societies where freedom of thought and expression are not only rights but where the expression of disagreement is encouraged. Some of the contributors to this blog don’t seem to understand that concept. While we may agree in general about what we want for Cuba, we do not need to agree on one common position, approach, method or means of expression. We will not be straight-jacketed in any way when it comes to expression. Unanimity of thought and expression was what was ingrained in castro’s schools. Some of you who were brainwashed as little pioneros with the all encompassing mandate for unanimity seem to still be contaminated with that kind of thinking. Yes, disagreement is sometimes unpleasant and nasty but it is a healthy manifestation of truly free societies.
    This is a concept that some Cubans outside of Cuba have yet to grasp (and probably never will), and that we hope will someday be intrinsic in a free and democratic Cuba.

  21. In the games of cards specially there is such a thing as “tells”, things each player does in times which happen w/the palyer not been aware hi/she is doing it.
    To play (no pun intended) when a voluneer defender & protector of the rebolution brigade decides to post a comment is in most cases easly identified by such “tells”.
    Agresiveness, arrogance, prone to insults, close mindness, blind loyalty, defensiveness, stridency; their format is always the same, quoting without context, no interes in truth searching but rather in forcefull contradiction of reason, lastly they exibit no understanding of the difference between reasoning & arguing.

  22. @#14
    I was going to answer, but someone better did it for me … #15.
    For #14 lesson #1:
    leanr to focus in the whole picture rather than in one issue, are you seeking truth or to win an argument? if you choose the first, research w/no bias, not to prove your point but to learm & if you chooose the second, winin an argument does not solve anything when that’s the only point other than defending your ego …

  23. Diego, don’t see your point. Yoani is telling us about something that happens all the time in Cuba, a touching story I thought. It relates to how many Cubans have been forced to leave the country, how many families are separated, how angry people are at the government, and how people are losing their fear of speaking out. And of course, how the government most Cubans hate takes 10% of the hard-earned money of their relatives and friends who left the country. You might have noticed the irony of the Party activist who lives of capitalist dollars. And the irony of the Cuban government also living off of the US dollar.

    You should talk to the woman in the story and ask her how happy she is.

  24. “Diego: the web is full of information to dispute the legitimacy of your statement,…”

    Really if it that easy to dispute what I wrote pls give at least one instance?

    And I’m still confused – is that fact that anyone receiving currency from any other country in the world [including the USA]is now 8% better off a good thing or not?

  25. “104,800 … how many are not coerced, intimidated or fake …?”

    well, for the ones in Cuba, the answer is 2, maybe 1

    outside Cuba, no shortage of groupies for any cause from Bin-Laden to Charles Manson to Fidel

  26. As of today at this time our Yoani is beating “The Mummy” by about 10,000 followers! Not bad for a Flaca with no army! But she does have us!

    reflexionfidel

    104,800 Followers

    YOANI SANCHEZ

    114,599 Followers

  27. @#4
    thank you for the laugh … I can evision the esbirros, sitting around a table ready to tackle the “dissident” problem, a mission brought down to them from the hights of the rebolutionary shrine inhabied by fidel & co.
    The esbirros are determined, focused & ready to serve, because rauls said so. The division of tasks have been made, uniforms starched & boots shined, the picture of saint fidel hungs from the wall, his stern eyes overlooking their every move while pointing his finger as a guide … (while the secretly placed microphones record their every word just in case).
    Diego: the web is full of information to dispute the legitimacy of your statement, you are not dealing w/the capive audience of the past, Cubans are learning faster than you how to do research, cubans now have access to the truth; your credibility before questioned now can be easly destroyed since the rebolution cannot any longer control the sources of information & the context of it.

  28. YOUTUBE: Oscar Haza, Ciberguerra Cibernetica en Cuba -Oscar Haza, Cyber ​​Cyberwar in Cuba

    A Mano Limpia, marzo 8, 2011. Pedro Sevcec e invitados opinan sobre la ciberguerra cibernetica en Cuba. La dictadura cubana declara la guerra a los disidentes ciberneticos; en la mira la bloguera Yoani Sanchez. Tambien hablan sobre la importancia de la participacion politica y social de la mujer en las sociedades decaidas del mundo hoy dia.

    A Mano Limpia, March 8, 2011. Pedro Sevcec and guests are saying about cyberwar cyber in Cuba. The Cuban dictatorship declares war on cyber dissidents, in looking at the blogger Yoani Sanchez. Also talk about the importance of social and political participation of women in societies decayed in the world today.

  29. REUTERS: Cubans vent frustrations as party congress nears-By Marc Frank

    – Cubans, speaking out in citizen meetings leading to a Communist Party congress in April, have given officials an earful about their economic worries and said the government must do a better job, people close to the process said this week.
    They said concerns about low salaries, high prices and cutting state subsidies dominated discussions in the thousands of meetings held across the country from December through February.

    The government said more than 7 million people, out of a population of 11.2 million, participated.

    “People are very preoccupied over rising prices, over the lack of balance between wages and prices and over what will happen to the most vulnerable, for example if the food ration is cut,” said a Communist Party member involved in compiling comments from the meetings.

    A summary of the citizen input will be provided to the public before the party congress, where 1,000 delegates will vote on proposed economic reforms put forth by President Raul Castro, who is under pressure from creditors over late debt payments and the population over economic stagnation.

    He wants to transform Cuba’s social system from one based on collective work and consumption to one where markets, individual initiative and reward play larger roles and targeted welfare replaces cradle-to-grave subsidized goods and services.

    According to the proposals the state would pull back from some secondary activities in favor of private initiative, stop directly administering state-run companies and cede more power to local governments.

    Hundreds of thousands of state jobs would be cut in favor of an expanding “non-state” sector, while such things as subsidized utilities and the monthly food ration would be eliminated to improve government productivity and finances.

    HOPE AND DREAD

    Cubans appear to be looking to the congress with a mix of hope and dread.

    Under changes already taking place, more than 113,000 people have taken out licenses for self-employment and 100,000 leased fallow state land in hopes of earning more money, but the state is also demanding more taxes and giving fewer handouts.

    “Me and my family feel much more squeezed than last year,” said pensioner Yolanda, who rents out a room to tourists in her Santiago de Cuba home.

    Yolanda said she supported Castro’s reforms, but thought lower taxes and more controls on rising prices were needed.

    “I used to pay a monthly tax of $136 to rent my room and now I have to pay $200,” she said.- The public meetings also reflected changing sentiment about the country’s economic woes. Many people blamed the system, and not just the U.S. trade embargo against Cuba, long accused of being the main culprit, the sources said.

    People repeatedly demanded the government improve its performance in exchange for tightening their belts.

    “Many people asked why, after repeatedly complaining about the waste generated by its monopoly on food distribution, most produce was still under its control and food rotting in fields and on trucks,” said a retired party official in Guantanamo, with knowledge of the discussion.

    All in all, “the discussions generated an enormous amount of information about how the people look at and understand the main problems facing the country,” said a party member in central Camaguey province. “And this puts enormous pressure on the government to respond adequately.”

    It will not be easy, said Vicente Gonzalez, president of the Santiago de Cuba Provincial Administrative Council, but “we have to carry out these changes because the alternative is a debacle.”

    “If we are not capable of creating a sustainable country where we produce what we need through hard work and sacrifice we will lose our main achievements,” he said, referring to free healthcare and education provided to all Cubans.

    (Editing by Jeff Franks and Mohammad Zargham)

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/03/17/us-cuba-congress-complaints-idUSTRE72G4LB20110317

  30. 2 years ago, while departing from Cuba, right at the exit door, I was stopped by a large group of locals with $US in their hands. They asked me to exchange their @US into CUC or $CAN . I refused, as I was not fully aware of the fact that they would lose so much if they went to CADECA.

  31. ***
    One rich money for the King and his evil group. Another almost worthless money for most Cubans. And Castro steals part of the help U.S. Cuban families send their loved ones in Cuba. What crooks and bandits! And the U.S. Black Congressional Congress members support Castro–useful traitors. Free Cuba!
    ***
    Un dinero rico por el Rey y su grupo malo. Otro dinero casi sin valor por la mayorea de los Cubanos. Y Castro roba parte de los ayudas que las families Cubanos en los Estados Unidos mandan a sus queridos en Cuba. Que ladrones and bandidos! Y el grupo de miembros Negros del Congreso de los Estados Unidos apoyan a Castro–idiotas tontas. Cuba Libre!
    ***
    John Bibb
    ***

  32. Diego, it was a 18% RIPOFF by THE CASTROFACISTS! Now is only 10%! The Euro to US dollar is set by the international markets NOT by DICTATORS!The whole dollar/cuban dollar bull is what the CASTROFACIST MAFIA DOES TO KEEP ITSELF IN POWER.

  33. So that anyone receiving currency from any other country in the world is now 8% better off is not a positive?

    The only foreign currency that has a 10% penalty applied is that of the USA which is the ONLY country with an economoc/political embargo on Cuba- in turn the ONLY country that prevents its citizens from using debit/credit cards in Cuba.

    “My son works hard to send this money and look what they turn it into,” she said.
    These were the words of a mother living in Europe who had just been sent by her son $100USD only to find that the rapacious European banks only gave her 69 Euros. What a rip-off!

  34. it seems like time has cought up w/the rebolution, all the amateurs, the ideologs & theorists w/all their pronouncements & “heroic” deeds are being proven wrong, not by argument, not by shouting matches but by reality. The simplest of which is “individuality”.
    The “collective dictatorship & the dictatorship of the proletariat” do not work because it is unable to adapt & evolve, its rigidity does not allow for change.
    Case & point, this currency changes are a hopeful reaction in the part of the rebolution, not to effect a permanent solution but to buy time.
    The economists of the rebolution having been “infected” w/it rethoric are unable to see beyond their own perception, they have been brainwashed to refuse outside help, perceiving it as an attack, they don’t rcognize the concept of global economics since their vision is limited to waht they are allowed to see their own little picture least the become dissidents …

  35. My grandmother Maria on my father’s side remained in Cuba as well as some of my uncles, aunts and cousins. This post has made me cry and remember her, for she died in the early 1970’s, WAY before I visited Cuba in 1997! My father was one of the youngest of her 10+ children and it must have been so hard for her to see my brother and I, two of her grandchildren leave Cuba after their father’s death who were a reminder of who he was! All I can say, is that this story of Yoani is so familiar to so many families in and out of that island! AMEN!

Comments are closed.