The Starting Line

Photo: Orlando Luis Pardo Lazo

The Paseo del Prado has been unsettled for the last couple of days, and not just because of the hustlers hustling and the hookers trolling for tourists. The uproar comes from the new Decree-Law No. 288 which establishes rules for the buying and selling of housing. A long-awaited measure that finally sees the light of day in the Official Gazette, to the relief of many and concern of others. In the spontaneous housing exchange that exists on this pedestrian promenade bordered by bronze lions, the curious ask about the details of a measure undoubtedly more flexible, but still insufficient. They want to know if the property title that they have in their hands grants them, starting now, full rights to assign, inherit or sell their houses. In a nation that has lived for decades with a frozen real estate market, they find it hard to believe that everything will be as easy as some speculate, or as legal as the Ministry of Justice assures us.

One of the principal fears on the street now is concern about how the Central Bank will rule on the legitimacy of money used to buy real estate. Because for every transaction of this type the cash must first be deposited in an account and the distrustful clients of our banking system fear that it could end up being confiscated if the State decides it didn’t come from “clean” sources. But to every risk people will respond with some kind of trick, so I imagine that from now on the funds declared and placed in the bank will be a half or a third of the real cost of the house. The rest will pass from one hand to another, from one pocket to another. For too long we have behaved like outlaws in this area, so one shouldn’t expect that starting now everything will be done according to the 16 pages of the new decree.

There is also the possibility of a migratory stampede, because “the act of owners transferring their housing, before permanently leaving the country, is legal under the act.” Thousands of Cubans have been waiting for this signal, like runners crouched at the starting line waiting for the gun to go off. The high costs of immigration procedures will be covered by the sale of homes that will offered for sale in the real estate market. A house, for forty years an anchor, will become a set of wings. It’s notable, of course, that the new measure includes the tenuous twine that pulls the piñata out of reach, already evidenced in the decree about the sale of cars. The wedge of the pie reserved only for those ideologically most-trusted owners, was expressed this time in Point 110. It states, “the Executive Committee of the Council of Ministers and its President will be able to decide, with respect to housing located in determined areas of the country.” We will see the map of the Island riddled with patches where the requirements to buy and sell will not be written anywhere. The so-called “frozen zones” will grow and the social differences — so often denied — will flourish, particularly that deep abyss that separates those trusted who are with money from those citizens with resources not sanctified by power.

18 thoughts on “The Starting Line

  1. Here’s more of self-delusional self-harm by their own hand, those strange and quite ignorant team “yoani” traitors.

    Not so long ago they wrote a few “thoughts” about the real estate in Cuba and called for relaxing of the current rules. After all, being faithful followers of their white “gods” delusions, they said that it was unfair that a simpleton housewife owns a “mansion” while a doctor, a plastic chirurg (who could do some work on the granny pin up, and should be for free…) who, common consensus and the support group of pioneers of the new revolution state, got his money through illegal operations on a side, lives in a small apartment.

    Truth be told, he’s a lot better citizen in future Cuba as the losers, the team “yoani”, see it. He’s making money illegally, he’s good for biznes (in cuban sewage rats slang), and he CAN pay for repairs, thanks to these ILLEGAL operations he did by stealling the tools and supplies from the hospitals (which then fell in disrepair because under the sanctions these materials are hard to find, and those “democrats” are happy to use every opportunity to screw the country up further if thatg will help promote their lies supporting their nazist and criminal case).

    Such an “enterpreneur” is the perfect future citizen, although, if you ask me, he looks eerilly similar to his fathers from the past.

    And we know what good did that do to Cuba…

    So, now thewse hypocrites, with the team “yoani” leading the pack of liars, now boldly contradict themselves:

    “One of the principal fears on the street now is concern about how the Central Bank will rule on the legitimacy of money used to buy real estate. Because for every transaction of this type the cash must first be deposited in an account and the distrustful clients of our banking system fear that it could end up being confiscated if the State decides it didn’t come from “clean” sources.”

    Concern, suddenly… the source of all this money.

    But, THIS takes the title of the top hypocrisy:

    “A house, for forty years an anchor, will become a set of wings. It’s notable, of course, that the new measure includes the tenuous twine that pulls the piñata out of reach, already evidenced in the decree about the sale of cars. The wedge of the pie reserved only for those ideologically most-trusted owners, was expressed this time in Point 110. It states, “the Executive Committee of the Council of Ministers and its President will be able to decide, with respect to housing located in determined areas of the country.” We will see the map of the Island riddled with patches where the requirements to buy and sell will not be written anywhere. The so-called “frozen zones” will grow and the social differences — so often denied — will flourish, particularly that deep abyss that separates those trusted who are with money from those citizens with resources not sanctified by power.”

    Well done crimson nazists!!! You have surpassed your morbid talents to lie more every time you write some stupidity, YET AGAIN!!!

  2. Due to the housing crisis the regime planned the construction of no less than 100,000 housing units per year starting in 2006. But since 2007 has been a steady decline in the number of units built, reaching only 33,900 units in 2010, Cuba National Statistics Office ONE). The housing construction, a little more than 40, 000 per year, not only are not enough to solve the housing deficit, but not even to replace those lost by various causes. Like the King Midas in reverse everything the Castros’ regime touch turn it into a disaster.

    The 1953 census reported 1.26 million housing units in existence. It was estimated that 50,000 new homes per year were required to meet the population grow. By 1958 it was estimate in 1.764 million housing units in existence. From 1953 to 1958 about 500,000 housing units were built, equivalent to 83,333 units a year, a remarkable feat. Make your own conclusions.

  3. YOUTUBE : DOCUMENTARY: “Artist Humberto Calzada” by Eduardo Montes-Bradley

    From his Coral Gable´s studio Calzada attempts to reconstruct Havana with a stroke of a brush and his childhood memories.The Reconstructing Havana paintings. A much-enlarged photograph of current private and public buildings in Havana is partially “reconstructed” by painting in what once was and what, someday, could be again.

    Humberto Calzada b. in Havana, on May 25, 1944, is a Cuban-American Artist living in Miami, Florida since 1960.[1]

    Calzada’s family left Cuba shortly after the communist takeover of Fidel Castro, on October 11, 1960. He attended and graduated from Coral Gables High School. He would later attend the University of Miami where he graduated as an Industrial Engineering in 1966, and the University of Miami where he also earned an MBA in Finance in 1968.

    Finally, in 1976, Calzada decided to pursue painting as a full-time career. The subject of most of his art is the architecture of Cuba particularly Havana’s colonial and neo-classical architecture.

  4. According to a Juventud Rebelde report in April 2008, in the city of Havana alone, 28,000 people resided in buildings about to collapse. The expansion of slums (cuarterias shanty towns, shelters) in the city has increased 50%, housing as many as 450,000 inhabitants, 20% of the city 2.2 million. It is very common that 3 generations live in a single house. This is the fundamental reason why the people occupy terraces, balconies, porches, sidewalks, and build mezzanines, to gain space. This has created a grave social problem for the regime.

  5. THIS IS COMMUNISM? OR SOCIALISM? LOOKS MORE LIKE AN OLIGARCHY TO ME!

    OLIGARCHY is a form of power structure in which power effectively rests with an elite class distinguished by royalty, wealth, family ties, commercial, and/or military legitimacy. Since the collapse of the Soviet Union on 31 December 1991, privately owned Russia-based multinational corporations, including producers of petroleum, natural gas, and metal have become oligarchs. Privatization allowed executives to amass phenomenal wealth and power almost overnight. In May 2004, the Russian edition of Forbes identified 36 of these oligarchs as being worth at least US$1 billion.[4]

  6. The biggest laugh I’ve had here, and another reason why Cuba needs a one-party state.

    from Humberto’s last post:

    A Cuban government economist, Omar Everleny Perez, says without blinking:

    “13 percent of Cubans hold 90 percent of the money in all of the island’s private bank accounts…”

    If a Cuban exile would have said such a thing every Marxist nutcase would be on here yelling “CIA propaganda” and a million other insults. So when are the “take back” gang going to occupy Havana?

    And that’s just the official story. With most Cubans hiding their money outside the Cuban banking system, inequality could be much higher.

    Here are how things stand in the more egalitarian USA:

    The top 20 percent of Americans now holds 84 percent of U.S. wealth.

    from
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distribution_of_wealth

  7. INTERESTING ARTICLE WITH SOME SURPRISING INFORMATION! SOME HIGHLIGHTS BELOW!

    MIAMI HERALD: Free-market reforms take hold in Cuban countryside- By PAUL HAVEN and ANDREA RODRIGUEZ

    SANTA ISABEL DE LAS LAJAS, Cuba — On sleepy streets plied by rickety horse-drawn carts and rusting 1950s automobiles, the sounds of commerce are once again being heard in Cuba’s countryside.

    A private sandwich shop has opened in a town previously served only by a grim state-run cafeteria. A woman sells trinkets from a small spot of shade. A weathered farmer in dusty jeans has rigged up an ancient ice cream machine and is selling cones for 8 cents a pop.

    Out of sight of Cuba’s dollar-spending tourists, in areas where money from overseas relatives trickles in only sporadically, dusty towns like this one slowly are being revitalized by a series of private enterprise initiatives ushered in by President Raul Castro.

    The new businesses are exceedingly modest. The income generated is nowhere near enough to transform Cuba’s perennially weak economy. But on the level of individual lives, or the hopes of a small town, residents say the reforms have been a boon.
    “It’s a way of having something that is all yours,” said Alain Suarez, who along with his family has opened a professional looking “guarapera,” or sugarcane juice stand, in Santa Isabel de Las Lajas, about 25 kilometers (16 miles) from the central city of Cienfuegos up a bumpy byway lined by tall fields of sugar cane.

    The bright-faced 23-year-old points to a small pizza stand across the street from his establishment, and another that sells sandwiches. “All these businesses that have opened up recently have given the town new life.”

    While he speaks to a reporter, a dozen schoolchildren come over to buy drinks, and a huge press that Suarez’s father concocted with an old American electric motor whirrs from a back room, sending sugarcane juice running down a metal trough and through a little window into a bucket near the front counter. The children pay 4 cents each for a cup, and go off happy.

    As Suarez’s little juice stand shows, free enterprise starts off small in a place where most residents make salaries of about $20 a month and where all private businesses, from humble grocery stores to electronics shops to giant factories, were taken over by the socialist state in the late 1960s.

    But Cuba’s countryside benefits from a quirk of the country’s economic system. Because big, inefficient state-controlled farms have trouble meeting the country’s demand for food, it may be the only place in the hemisphere where small-scale private farmers are near the top of the income pile.

    “Here, everything is reversed,” Omar Everleny Perez, the lead economist at Havana University’s Center for Cuban Economic Studies, told The Associated Press in the first interview that any Cuban government or university economist has given a foreign news organization since the reforms were announced in October 2009.

    Perez said Cuban farmers survived the lean years of the 1990s that followed the collapse of the Soviet Union better than city dwellers because they were able to sell the food they grew at relatively high prices to those desperate for nourishment.

    “There are bank accounts worth 4 or 5 million Cuban pesos ($160,000 to $200,000) in the hands of farmers,” he said. Perez said 13 percent of Cubans hold 90 percent of the money in all of the island’s private bank accounts. “It is very concentrated, and much of it belongs to the farmers,” he said.

    COPY AND PASTE LINK IF NOT ACITVE FOR ENTIRE ARTICLE!

    http://www.miamiherald.com/2011/11/06/2489436/free-market-reforms-take-hold.html

  8. During the last 52 years the construction of new houses has been dismal. The regime statistics in the construction of new houses are cooked. This suspicion is validated by Former Vice-Minister Carlos Lage who near the beginning of 2009 revealed that less than half of the 111,300 housing units claimed built in 2006 were in fact built. Beside the 2002 census data show that of the new housing units built between 1990 and 2002, close to 50,000 were bohíos and adobe structures (primitive dwellings with palm bark or adobe walls, earthen floors and palm leave roofs). Those can’t be classified as adequate housing.

  9. ‘‘Nothing justifies fraud or trickery like was produced last year when a number of houses were reported as finished, and they weren’t,’’ Vice President Carlos Lage said last year.

    For our readers of English, the above translates into:

    ‘‘Nothing justifies fraud or trickery like was produced the last 52 years …’’ Vice President Carlos Lage said last year.

    I’ve seen the same boxes without roofs or windows for as long as I’ve been going to Cuba. I remember years ago, after I’d seen a bunch of them unchanged for 5 years, I asked some Cubans when the construction project was going to be finished. They all laughed. That’s when I learned all the one-room houses I’d been looking at without windows or roofs were inhabited by real people and were actually being “deconstructed” by hurricanes and time.

    To make an easy prediction, all the Marxists who have been blissfully walking over Cuba’s homeless for 52 years will suddenly “see” them as soon as Cuba isn’t to their liking, TV cameras in hand, and blame it all on capitalism and America.

  10. I HAVE HEARD SOME ANALYSIS AND MANY SAY THAT THIS NEW LAW ALLOWING THE SELLING OF HOMES IS MEANT TO DO AT LEAST TWO THINGS THE CASTROFASCISTS WANT: 1. BRING IN NEEDED CASH FROM THE DIASPORA SO THAT THEIR RELATIVES WILL BUY HOMES FOR THEMSELVES OR FOR THEM 2. WILL PROVIDE CASH TO SOME CUBANS SO THAT THOSE THAT WANT TO LEAVE CAN PAY ALL THE EXORBITANT FEES NEEDED, THUS PROVIDING A PRESSURE VALVE RELEASE OF THOSE WHO ARE DISENCHANTED! IT WILL DEFINITELY NOT BE STRONG ENOUGH TO FIX THE HOUSING CRISIS WITH THESE KINDS OF NUMBERS!

    HAVANA JOURNAL: Housing crisis in Cuba may be never be fixed- October 10, 2008

    Even before the storm, the Cuban government press said the national housing deficit was 600,000 units, up from 530,000 five years ago. The government boasted of building 110,000 houses last year, then acknowledged that they had not even come close.

    ‘‘Nothing justifies fraud or trickery like was produced last year when a number of houses were reported as finished, and they weren’t,’’ Vice President Carlos Lage said last year.

    The National Housing Institute adjusted its goal to 50,000 new homes a year. At that rate, it would take at least 20 years to build all the homes Cuba needs.

    According to media reports, the government had built just 22,558 by June this year.

    ‘‘Hurricanes have been hitting Cuba forever, and never, never, never was it like this time,’’ said Florida International University architecture professor Nicolas Quintana, a former Havana city planner. “What will it take to rebuild? Rebuild how? Are you talking tin roofs and wood walls? If you really want to rebuild, you need a good $50 billion.’‘

    COPY AND PASET LINK IF NOT ACTIVE FOR ENTIRE ARTICLE!

    havanajournal.com/culture/entry/housing-crisis-in-cuba-may-be-never-be-fixed/

  11. House deficit is estimated in 1.6 million units. 75% of the units in existence are over 40 years old, and 60% of the total is in bad or average condition according to the Cuban National Housing Institute.

    Official estimates indicate that 457,800 homes were damage by five hurricanes in recent years, of which 76,854 were destroyed and 91,472 seriously damaged. The lack of adequate housing is the regime gravest social problem. Without sufficient capital investment to provide adequate housing this has become a nearly insuperable obstacle for the regime.

  12. Now that socialism is officially dead in Cuba, how do all the admirers of Castro justify the one party state? Are they waiting to see the corpse dragged through the golf courses of new capitalist Cuba?

    It used to be “we need a one-party dictatorship to protect glorious socialism against those capitalists who do evil things like buy and sell houses and believe in private property.”

    So what is it now? “We need a one-party dictatorship to protect individual property rights?”

    I don’t expect a rational response, just been amusing to see how all the “leftists” who worship Castro are putting the spin on recent events. Maybe Pinochet and Franco were leftists too?

    Comrades, don’t worry, North Korea was always the real paradise.

  13. MY QUESTIONS IS! HOW CAN YOU BE A “CYNIC” WHEN YOU HAVE NO INFORMATION ABOUT HOW THE REST OF THE WORLD WORKS, CANT CHECK PRICES, OTHER STRUCTURES FOR REAL ESTATE! I JUST LAUGH AT THESE REPORTERS WHO ARE IN A “DILEMMA” AS YOANI POINTED OUT ON HER ARTICLE IN FOREIGN POLICY MAGAZINE: Unfit to Print- How the Arab Spring made life even harder for foreign journalists in Cuba.- BY YOANI SÁNCHEZ

    “The dilemma of foreign correspondents — popularly called “foreign collaborators” — is whether to make concessions in reporting in order to stay in the country, or to narrate the reality and face expulsion. The major international media want to be here when the long-awaited “zero day” arrives — the day the Castro regime finally makes its exit from history. For years, journalists have worked to keep their positions so they will be here to file their reports with two pages of photos, testimonies from emotional people, and reports of colored flags flapping all over the place.”

    ASSOCIATED PRESS: Analysis: Cuba reforms convincing island’s cynics- By PETER ORSI

    HAVANA — The lot in teeming Central Havana used to be the neighborhood eyesore: The shattered ruins of an abandoned building was a breeding ground for mosquitoes and rats, then it was cleared in favor of a dreary parking lot and government-run food stand.

    Today, it is home for independent sellers hawking brightly colored clothing, wristbands and earrings as salsa music booms and a line of bicycle taxi drivers forms at the gate to wait for fares.

    This week’s announcement establishing a real estate market for the first time in 50 years comes just a month after a similar opening for vehicles, and newly empowered entrepreneurs speak excitedly of the changes.

    “I’ve been an independent worker two times, once before in the 1990s,” said Andres Lambreto Diaz, a 38-year-old clothing seller at the Central Havana bazaar who has seen earlier free-market openings abruptly slammed shut when Fidel Castro reversed course. “I think this time it’s for real.”

    Many of the reforms merely acknowledge what had long been black-market realities, and they still fall short of the fundamental free-market transformations seen in other communist countries such as Vietnam and China. But collectively, the changes have loosened the government’s iron grip over all aspects of the economy.

    “This is one of the most visible economic reforms, with a direct impact on Cuban lives,” said Arturo Lopez-Levy, a Cuban-born economist who teaches at the University of Denver.

    A little over a year has passed since the government declared that many more people would be allowed to go into business for themselves and even hire employees.

    The housing and automobile laws have come on schedule, but some announced changes have been delayed, most notably a plan to eliminate 500,000 government jobs, extend bank credits and allow for mid-sized cooperative companies.

    Other reforms that were floated are still just ideas, such as proposals to relax travel restrictions and create a system of credit for private businesses. And there has been little visible progress on a wholesale market to supply entrepreneurs, though officials said from the beginning that would take years.

    Officials have shown some sensitivity to popular feedback, modifying the tax code to make things easier for new entrepreneurs and repeatedly changing laws to help new private restaurants be more profitable.

    That kind of flexibility has been rare during Cuba’s half-century-long embrace of Marxist theory.

    Agricultural reform in the 1960s redistributed land from huge farms to medium-size ones and it enjoyed moderate success before being abandoned by the government, said economist Rafael Romeu, head of the Washington-based Association for the Study of the Cuban Economy.

    In the 1980s a six-year experiment with private farmers markets was scrapped, as Fidel Castro complained that unscrupulous middlemen were buying up the food and reselling at higher prices.

    Castro grudgingly allowed independent workers to begin doing business for themselves after the collapse of the Soviet Union brought Cuba to the brink of economic ruin, then taxed and regulated them nearly into extinction in the late 1990s when the worst of the crisis was over.

    But Fidel is no longer in charge. His brother Raul Castro has repeatedly said that while he has no intention of scrapping Cuba’s socialist model, there’s no turning back from his reforms.

    Analysts say the changes so far do not do enough. For example, the housing law’s immediate aim is to help redistribute existing homes, allowing big families crammed into tiny apartments to move into larger spaces now occupied by just a few people.

    Without significant improvements in investment, supplies of construction materials and incentive to make money, it’s not clear there will be much new construction to solve Cuba’s underlying problem: a housing deficit estimated at between 500,000 to 1.6 million units on an island of 11 million people.

    “So far there hasn’t been an all-embracing change in philosophy by the government in Cuba. What they’re doing is really tinkering with sectors,” said Paul Hare, a lecturer in international relations at Boston University who was British ambassador to Cuba in 2001-2004.

    The 80-year-old Raul Castro is walking a tightrope, eager to reform the country before it is too late, but cautious to not move so fast that the state loses control over the process, as happened in the Soviet Union and other Soviet Bloc nations. He has said repeatedly that Cuba will change “without pause, but without haste.”

    Nonetheless, several Cuba observers said that once started, reforms tend to snowball and could spill beyond the realm of pure economics.

    “The liberalization of these markets will ignite new demands for reforms,” Lopez-Levy said. “In the long run, the question will be: How long can the economic genie be out of the bottle without people asking for more substantive political reform?”

    Associated Press writer Andrea Rodriguez contributed to this report.

    http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5gaYYO40P2m-OCvtbPUk7aZjnXYZg?docId=ee4115ab335c4f91afb39a3dbd31828c

  14. OUR YOANI’S SECOND BOOK IN MIAMI!! WILL THE CASTROFASCISTS LET HER ATTEND? WISHFUL THINKING ON MY PART! BUT SOMEDAY SOON! VERY SOON IT WILL HAPPEN!

    MIAMI BOOK FAIR INTERNATIONAL: PROGRAM AND EVENTS

    Word Press: un blog para hablar al mundo, de Yoani Sánchez. Con la participación de Carlos Alberto Montaner, Eugenio Tuya y Alberto Muller
    Thursday, Nov. 17, 7:30 p.m., Auditorium (Building 1, 2nd Floor, Room 1261)
    Miami Book Fair International * Miami Dade College
    300 NE Second Ave., Miami, FL 33132
    Auditorium (Building 1, 2nd Floor, Room 1261)

    http://www.miamibookfair.com/events/word_press_un_blog_para_hablar_al_mundo.aspx

    Yoani Sánchez : Filóloga y periodista cubana, residente en La Habana, que ha alcanzado notoriedad mundial por su blog Generación Y, desde donde have una descripción crítica de la realidad de su país. Generación Y es el blog cubano con más seguidores: traducido a diecisiete idiomas por un equipo de voluntarios, llega a tener más de catorce millones de accesos al mes e inspira miles de comentarios. Ha recibido varios reconocimientos internacionales, entre los que destaca el premio Ortega y Gasset concedido en el año 2008 por el diario el País en España, el prestigioso galardón The BOSs de la Deutsche Welle, al mejor blog del mundo, una mención especial del María Moors Cabot de la Universidad de Columbia y el prestigioso premio Príncipe Claus 2010. Sánchez fué profesora de WordPress en la primera Academia Blogger cubana, además de extender el uso de Twitter y de redes sociales en una de las naciones con más baja conectividad a Internet. En esta edición de la Feria presentará su libro WordPress: un blog para hablar al mundo, a través de un video grabado y comunicación telefónica.
    Carlos Alberto Montaner : Recientemente publicó su tercera novela, La Mujer del Coronel, bajo el sello Alfaguara. Nació en La Habana. Vive en Madrid desde 1970. Escritor, periodista, professor, conferencista, ha publicado numerosos libros, artículos y ensayos en diarios de España, Estados Unidos y América Latina. La revista Poder calculó en seis millones los lectores que semanalmente se asoman a sus columnas, reproducidos en docenas de diarios y revistas. En esta edición de la Feria presentará su más reciente novela La mujer del coronel (Alfaguara, 2011).

    Eugenio Tuya : Ingeniero y editor. Estudió su carrera de ingeniería en la ciudad de San Petersburgo, Rusia. En 1992 se establece en Berlín y en 1994 en Madrid. Desde 1999 ejerce como editor para la editorial española Anaya Multimedia, especializada en libros de informática, tecnología digital y actualidad. Su labor editorial incluye más de 500 títulos. Presentará en esta edición de la Feria, el libro WordPress: un blog para hablar al Mundo, de Yoani Sánchez (Anaya Multimedia, 2010).

    Alberto Muller : Escritor y periodista. Professor de la asignatura Periodismo: Ética y Leyes en la Universidad de Miami. Fundador del Directorio Revolucionario Estudiantil, que luchó contra la dictadura de Castro, por lo que sufrió 15 años de prisión política en las cárceles de Cuba. Autor de una amplia obra literaria y ensayística, entre sus libros: la novela Monólogo con Yolanda y los ensayos históricos, El proyecto Varela y Retos del Periodismo. En esta edición de la Feria participará en la presentación del libro WordPress: un blog para hablar al mundo, de Yoani Sánchez.

  15. Once again, Yoani has hit the nail on the head, exactly the way things are and will be.

    Except I think there are many Cubans with money from US relatives, who wanted to flee at one time but now see the end of the system coming. Some of them will be willing to plant their stake now in the housing market and wait for the complete collapse of socialism. Like in the Soviet Union and China, the “restructuring of socialism” is a bit of face saving as the current communist nobility tries to stay in power through capitalism.

Comments are closed.