Mobile Vendors

"Supply and demand" bicycle taxi

Every so often a new campaign appears in our media, some offensive against certain social or economic phenomenon. Lately the campaign is directed against the mobile vendors, those sellers of fruits and vegetables who transport their goods on a tricycle or other wheeled device. The official journalists argue that such traders operate under the “capitalist” law of supply and demand, rather than making prices more affordable for consumers. They also criticize the fact that they offer their products by the unit, rather than by pounds or kilograms, which gives them room for inflated prices. Although this is a problem that hurts us all, I don’t think we will solve it with appeals to the vendors’ conscience.

The mobile vendor supplies those neighborhoods lacking in farmers markets, and especially during the hours that those that do exist are closed. Their prices also take into account — although the official TV doesn’t recognize this — the time they save their clients who no longer need to travel or to stand in the long lines of a “state market.” For most working women who come home after five to invent a meal, the cry of “Avocados and onions!” shouted at their doors is a salvation. It’s true that the costs of none of these products bear any relation to their salaries, but nor does the produce on these mobile stands rot for lack of buyers. The fact that someone should have to work two days to buy a squash is not an expression of excess on the part of the vendor, but rather of the miserable wages paid.

It’s surprising, for example, that the concerned prime time news reporters don’t take off on the excesses at the stores that sell in convertible pesos, where to buy a quart of oil costs an entire weeks wages. The difference between the mobile vendors and these hard-currency stores is that the first are operated by the self-employed while the latter are the property of the State. Thus, we will never see a report denouncing the extremely high mark-up added to the costs of importing or producing some food offered at the so called “shoppings.” Because it’s better to look for a scapegoat and to use it to explain the life of famine and culinary greyness in which we are submerged. For now, the blame is laid on the mobile vendors. So you should run to your balcony — right now — and watch them pass through your street, because very soon they may no longer exist.

37 thoughts on “Mobile Vendors

  1. Everything that state owned store that sells in convertible pesos earns goes to the state and is used for social programs like free education and health care.

    Everything that mobile vendor earns goes into his own pocket. He probably don’t even pay the tax. No benefit to the society.

  2. Lo de CUBA es un DESCARO… HASTA CUANDO??????

    The Castro’s think they own the island and treat the resources as if they are theirs too. .
    DICTATORS are a thing of the PAST. The Castro’s have MILKED the people of Cuba for the last 52 years and the reason CUBA looks like SHIT today.

    Support las Damas De Blanco as they are the best thing happening in Cuba today.

  3. Cuba Libre,

    So you would like to vote for Mr. Castro would you? Well now, there’s something you already share with the Cuban people you so patronizingly adore: they never had a chance to vote for Castro either!

  4. Cuba libre #26 – I get plenty of nods and hello’s in many places around the world, including my own neighbourhood. The Cubans are indeed friendly, but frequently they want something from you. Can’t blame them. You have everything, they have nothing. With reference to your trips to Cuba 2 or 3 times a year – you must have money to burn! Imagine a Cuban taking 3 trips to a foreign country every year! That’s if they were ALLOWED to leave. You are typical of all the chardonnay sipping socialists.

  5. Cuba Libre (la mentirita) said: “How do you manage to slepp at nite Mr. Ciber Rata??”

    VERY WELL C.L. WITH LOTS OF LINKS UNDER MY PILLOW TO KEEP ME COMPANY AND SECURE! AND HOW DO YOU SLEEP AT NIGHT WITH ALL THAT BLAH, BLAH, BLAH, BLAH UNDER YOUR BREATH? DOES IT KEEP YOU UP AT NIGHT? WHEN YOU BECOME A MAN, LETS TALK!

  6. Mr. C Libre, Cuba is desperate for cash rich capitalists. They’ll take just about any foreigner with cash, I’ve met many of them residing full time in Havana and other towns in Cuba.

    So stop with your grotesque lies and move to Cuba. Or if you don’t want to downgrade your internet, at least move to a high-speed internet American commune, where you can practice a bit of equality and still log into Facebook.

    Like I said, you prefer the capitalist monster and will never practice socialism in your life.

  7. Ah of course El Ciber raton, JA JA JA. You reply to my post with another comment with another post from some anti-castrist journalist paid by an anti-castrist boss, lol. How come no reference on the comments made on your recent presidents may I ask. And those are the people ruling your country? How do you manage to slepp at nite Mr. Ciber Rata??

  8. Cuba Libre (la mentirita) said: “For your information I would move to Cuba in a split second if immigration was allowed.”

    HA HA HA HA!! YOUR INTERNET CHIVATON/AGENT JOB IS PREVENTING YOU TO IMMIGRATE TO CUBA BECAUSE YOU HAVE TO PAY $6-$12 PER HOUR FOR DIAL UP? MAYBE YOU ARE ONE OF THE NEW INDEPENDENT CHIVATON/AGENT WORKERS THAT RAUL IS TRYING TO PUT IN THE “PRIVATE SECTOR”! YOU ARE TOO MUCH COMEMI*RDA!! JE JE JE! GO ON! IM HERE FOR YOU! JE JE JE!

  9. C.L.! IM GOING TO SPANK YOU AGAIN SINCE YOU ARE SUCH A EXHIBITIONIST! FUACATAAAAAAAAA!!

    BOOK: Inside the Cuban Revolution -Fidel Castro and the Urban Underground (Julia E. Sweig, Nelson and David Rockefeller Senior Fellow for Latin America Studies and Director for Latin America Studies).

    Sweig debunks two long-standing myths: that the Cuban Revolution was won by a band of guerrillas and peasants, and that domestic politics in Cuba is dead. According to Sweig’s review of original documents from Castro’s own archives, the revolution was the work of an urban network controlled by middle-class professionals who skillfully cultivated complex alliances with an array of disparate groups. These same skills have allowed Castro to survive—and even thrive—in the decade of global political and economic change since the collapse of his Soviet benefactor. Against all odds, he has forged a coalition of increasingly diverse constituencies at home and abroad. Sweig concludes that the roots of Fidelismo may be broader and deeper than many expect.

    http://www.cfr.org/cuba/inside-cuban-revolution/p4591

  10. For your information I would move to Cuba in a split second if immigration was allowed. The Revolutionary government does not want to pollute its way of life with outsiders and I sort of understand why. Seeing I cannot move their I visit 2 or 3 times a year and feel perfectly at home there. The warmth of the Cuban people is seen no where else in the world. You walk down any street and any stranger you see will either nod their heads at you, smile at you, or greet you with a friendly “hola”. Where do you see that in the U.S. or Canada pray tell.
    Another thing is how can you compare U.S. presidenta to Mr. Castro?? Let`s take a look. Bill Clinton who Miss Lewinsky worked under the table for. The Kennedy`s and the multiple orgies they used to have at the White House. John F. who was doing Marilyn while Jackie was doing Aristotle. The trigger Happy Bush`s who destroyed Irak because of “all” the supposed weapons of mass destruction”. Not satisfied with Irak we`ll move on to Afganistan maybe the weapons of mass destruction are there. And now Obama Ben Liden who plunged the U.S. into a never before seen “crash”. I`ll vote for Mr. Castro anyday, thank you.

  11. Cuba Libre (la mentirita) said: “A revolution which began with a handful of brave heroes who believed in a free Cuba, free from the capitalist monster that was devouring it alive and depriving its campesinos of the most fundemental neccesities of society, education and access to health care.”

    PLEASE C.L.! DO I HAVE TO DIGITALLY SPANK YOU AGAIN! MAYBE YOU LIKE IT! I MEANT FUACATAAAAAAAA! YOU AGAIN? JE JE JE!

    This is a study that was done in the 1960’s in Miami about the Cuban exile community there. It is very detailed and it contains survey results on things like: when and why they decided to leave Cuba, how they first felt about Fidel Castro and the Revolution, and things of that nature. This book is very good for Cuban Americans and for anyone else who is curious about where we (the Cuban Americans that came during the first wave of the exile) come from.

    PARTICIPATION IN ANTI-BATISTA ACTIVITY BY OCCUPATIONAL GROUP- P. 55

    SKILLED LABOR = 44% (my family was part of this group)
    SEMI-SKILLED AND UNSKILLED= 41%
    CLERICAL AND SALES = 30%
    PROFESSIONALS AND SEMI-PROFESSIONALS= 30%
    MILITARY AND POLICE= 0%

    Page 56 : ” The predominantly young and relative well educated refugees who participated in the struggle against Batista would be more likely than other refugees to engage in anti-Castro activity once in exile.”

    READ ON FOR MORE INFORMATION ON LINK BELOW

    http://books.google.com/books?id=DjisAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA55&lpg=PA55&dq=members+of+batista+army+in+exile+cuban&source=bl&ots=K7D0Ptnw40&sig=UqTlrMYPIOA8are9qhtEcqPkDCg&hl=en&ei=A4CsTonZEZKBsgKgzKDrDg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=6&ved=0CEoQ6AEwBQ#v=onepage&q&f=false

  12. Cuba Libre (la mentirita)!! YOU ARE BACK AMIGO! DONDE ESTABAS? TE ESTRAÑAMOS!! JE JE JE! OYE CHICO! DID YOU SEE MY RESPONSES TO YOUR LIES ON THE POST “Common Criminals” POST? NO TE ME HAGAS EL BOBO QUE TU ENTIENDES! JE JE JE! PLEASE RESPOND HERE IF YOU WISH! JE JE JE!

  13. The only thing I understand is that Mr. C Libre and the other trolls prefer living in the “capitalist monster” than in the socialist paradise of Cuba.

    Hey, there’s communism in the USA, and the communes here work better and are richer than anything in Cuba, so all you have to do to put communism in practice is join one of them. What’s the matter, you can’t even do that much for the ideals you claim you have? Afraid of a tiny bit of work and sharing? Easier to sit behind your capitalist computer insulting people who actually put their ideals into practice?

    Lots of big mouths spouting socialist rhetoric but preferring capitalism. Same goes with most of the “occupy” jokers.

  14. Anya posts 15 and 16
    I understand spanish but unfortunately I don`t know how to write fluently. My question is. you say Mr. Castro never put his life in danger. I say who was on the Granma when the first spark of a great revolution began???? A revolution which began with a handful of brave heroes who believed in a free Cuba, free from the capitalist monster that was devouring it alive and depriving its campesinos of the most fundemental neccesities of society, education and access to health care.

  15. To Damir,

    You do not understand basic economics. Vegetable vendors fill a need in the market. If their prices were unreasonable, the people would not buy their products.

    Exaggerated prices do not fuel inflation, they are the result of inflation. Inflation is caused by too many pesos chasing too few products. Cuban’s are paid in near worthless local pesos with which they must buy the necessities in life, but the stores do not have enough products for the demand. This is the cause of inflation. The CUC stores serve to add fuel to these inflationary forces by diverting products away from the local peso shops. Of course, the government reaps the benefits of the high profit margins at the CUC stores. The people loose out as once affordable necessities inflate in prices far beyond their means.

    Inflation won’t be solved by shutting down the bicycle vendors. The only way to reduce inflation is to increase production. But you won’t increase production if the farmers and workers are payed in worthless local pesos.

  16. More of intentional ignorance by the team “yoani”.

    “Every so often a new campaign appears in our media, some offensive against certain social or economic phenomenon. Lately the campaign is directed against the mobile vendors, those sellers of fruits and vegetables who transport their goods on a tricycle or other wheeled device. The official journalists argue that such traders operate under the “capitalist” law of supply and demand, rather than making prices more affordable for consumers. They also criticize the fact that they offer their products by the unit, rather than by pounds or kilograms, which gives them room for inflated prices. Although this is a problem that hurts us all, I don’t think we will solve it with appeals to the vendors’ conscience.”

    It amounts to usanian media criticising a company that would attempt to operate on socialist principles in capitalism.

    The team “yoani” are conveniently forgetting their own statements about the salaries of an average Cuban.

    If these remain as they are, then exagerrated prices DO fuel the inflation.

    “Convenience” of being saved from “standing in line” is not a justification for prices being prohibitively high that a few only can afford them. Prices, according to even “some kind of pragmatic capitalism” theory should be reasonable reflection of the work and resources employed in production.

    But the greedy never seem to grasp that simple fact.

    Even when they themselves go out to buy something they do not produce and haggle with the other seller in order to REDUCE the price so that they can buy it.

    Would it not be then simpler to have reasonable prices so that everyone gets the chance to buy everything they need, sell what they produce and keep the society egalitarian, as per the 1 of the 3 fundamental principles of “some kind of pragmatic capitalism”?

    Apparently, the reactive and conservative team “yoani” find it all too hard to grasp.

    It is much easier to incite the people and erode the society with false representations of the facts.

    As the fifth column, the traitors of their own country, do.

  17. THE PRESIDENT OF BRAZIL IS A HYPOCRITE! AND A CASTROFASCIST BOOT LICKER!

    AFP: Brazil’s Rousseff refuses to criticize Cuba’s rights record

    Brazil’s first woman president confirmed that she planned to call on revolutionary icon and former president Fidel Castro.
    “I await this meeting with a lot of pride,” said the former leftist guerrilla who was tortured under her country’s military dictatorship (1964-1985).
    HAVANA — Visiting Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff refused to criticize this communist-ruled nation’s human rights record here Tuesday, saying the issue should not be used to score ideological points.
    “One should sweep one’s own house before criticizing others. We in Brazil also have (human rights problems). Therefore I am willing to discuss human rights from a multilateral perspective,” she told reporters before conferring with President Raul Castro.
    Rousseff stressed that human rights should not be “a weapon for ideological political warfare.”
    In the case of Cuban opposition blogger Yoani Sanchez, who has been granted a visa by Brasilia, Rousseff said it was not up to Brazil to decide whether Cuban authorities should give the renown dissident an exit visa.
    Sanchez, who hopes to attend the premiere in Brazil of a documentary by Brazilian director Dado Galvao on February 10, has been denied permission to leave the island.
    Known worldwide for her award-winning blog “Generation Y,” she won the 2008 Ortega y Gasset prize for online journalism from Madrid daily El Pais.
    Rousseff has no plans to meet with dissidents, according to her entourage.

    CLICK LINK FOR ENTIRE ARTICLE!

    http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5iS9TnYbm61swUwM24BmqQqwHZg9w?docId=CNG.028f1f77f56e33c1084cdd34a97858f3.5f1

  18. Cuba L.: “The lady doth protest too much, methinks.”

    First you imply that Yoani, who you know perfectly well cannot defend herself against the base calumnies you fling at her, sits around drinking moonshine. Then you feign indignation and get all bent out of shape because I turn it around and say the same thing about you. Priceless. You can dish it out to someone who is effectively mute, but you can’t take it. As someone brilliantly noted a while ago here (I think it was Pamela), you need to pull on your big girl panties if you are going to start hurling insults.

    The next time you try to defame someone who can’t defend herself, do a little homework first. Implying that a person drinks moonshine carries with it a lot of baggage. Remember, you started this. I did not say you are insane, what I said was that you may want to get checked for brain damage because of all the hooch you seem to have consumed. Granted, in your case, this may be a distinction without a difference, but that’s neither here nor there.

    You also seem to take issue with Help, with whom I could not agree more. Manson, as you correctly point out, was a murderer. So are your heroes the castros and the parade of henchmen they have led. The mind boggles at how anyone could even attempt to justify the tyranny of the last 53 years. All of my heroines would stand by me on this, I am sure.

  19. FOR THOSE WHO SPEAK SPANISH EVEN A LITTLE BEAT! THIS KID ELICER HAS A GREAT FUTURE IN CUBA’S HISTORY AND POLITICS! THERE ARE ALSO TWO OTHER INTERVIEWS OF Alejandro Sánchez, Francisco Luis Manzanet

    MUY BUENA ENTREVISTA DEL “GUAJIRITO MAYOR” EN TRES PARTES: El discurso de Raúl Castro causó “tristeza y preocupación”El ingeniero cubano Eliécer Ávila afirmó que “crea las condiciones para que de alguna manera otros individuos se aferren también al poder”.
    http://www.martinoticias.com/noticias/El-discurso-de-Raul-Castro-causo-tristeza-y-preocupacion-138415589.html#.TyiMGod8wlg.facebook

  20. Ademas le informare que es tradicion cubana os vendedores cállejeros ( alguna oyo el manisero, peanut vendor?)
    Cuando yo era nina los vendedores de fruta hasta el pescado era un chino que vendia el pescado por la cale y de lazy, vago nada mi familia trabajaban siempre mipadres. El vago sera Ud escribiendo gilipollerias.

  21. ‘Cuba libre Ud escribio Fidel puso su vida or la lbertad de Cuba. NUNCA ME REIDO TANTO. Fidel nunca ha sxpuesto su vida por nada ni nadie, ni cuandk el Moncada, ni en La Sierra. MI madre lo vio en Sept de 1959 y se lo digo a el asi mismo: Comandante, su piel es como un bebe. COMO UNA PERSONA en la loma por anos trasteando rifles y pistolas, pudo tener la piel suave como unbebe? A uUd le vendieron el puente de Brooklyn por $10 piensd, digo, si tiene cerebro y no cree la propaganda casfrista. Seguro si cree todas las conspiricy theories atanco al gobierno de EUA pero se cree las mentiras del spinochio cubano

  22. LIBRO DIGITAL: “HABLAN LAS DAMAS DE BLANCO” – “Hablan las Damas” recoge los testimonios de veinticuatro de ellas. No están todas las que son, pero sin duda son todas las que están..

    Sus relatos, que forman los impactantes capítulos de este libro, hablan de registros nocturnos, juicios sumarios, encarcelamientos injustos, regímenes penitenciarios severos, condiciones infrahumanas, y cuerpos quebrantados por enfermedades contraídas en prisión. Hablan de hijos que preguntan por sus padres y de padres que anhelan volver a vivir con sus hijos, y de acoso e intimidación a los familiares. Pero también hablan de patriotismo, esperanza, fe, entrega, inquebrantables espíritus que resisten y una firme convicción en la -evidente- superioridad moral de su justa causa.

    Queremos que esas voces se oigan con fuerza, alto y claro. Deseamos que lleguen a todos los rincones de la tierra, a todos los oídos limpios del mundo – que son los que no están taponados por la cera del odio o del prejuicio-, para que las gentes de buena voluntad se solidaricen de palabra y de obra con estas mujeres.

    Porque con ellas, cada domingo, caminan el amor, el coraje y la dignidad de toda la humanidad.

    http://www.slideshare.net/72pantalla/libro-damas-de-blanco-hablan

  23. EXCELLENT!!!

    BLOOMBERG: Rousseff in Cuba Points to U.S. Rights Record at Guantanamo Bay- By Matthew Bristow and Cris Valerio- January 31, 2012,

    The death this month of jailed dissident Wilman Villar after a 50-day hunger strike has drawn attention in Brazil’s media to Castro’s rights record and the government’s refusal to criticize it. While Rousseff has so far ignored requests for a meeting from pro-democracy activists, her government last week granted a tourist visa to Yoani Sanchez after the Cuban blogger invoked the president’s experience surviving prison and torture in an appeal to be allowed to leave the island.

    ‘Awkward Situation’

    Rousseff vowed to make human rights a priority of her foreign policy, and in condemning abuses in Iran, she’s also distanced herself from the policies of her predecessor and mentor, Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva.

    Urged on by his Workers’ Party, some of whose leaders were exiled in Cuba, Lula refused to criticize Castro or his brother’s government while in power from 2003 to 2010. Following a visit in 2010, which coincided with the death of another hunger striker, the former union leader compared the country’s dissidents to “criminals” in Sao Paulo jails.

    “Rousseff is going to be in a very awkward situation by choice,” former Brazilian Foreign Minister Luiz Felipe Lampreia said in a phone interview from Rio de Janeiro. “She didn’t have to go to Cuba.”

    Rousseff, 64, said that with “great pride” she would meet Fidel Castro during her three-day tour of Cuba and Haiti, where she’ll head tomorrow to oversee Brazilian troops leading an United Nations peacekeeping force.

    No Back-Slapping

    While the Brazilian leader is unlikely to address Cuba’s human rights situation publicly, she’s able to talk productively to Castro about his government’s record behind the scenes, said Julia Sweig, a senior fellow at the Washington-based Council on Foreign Relations.

    “There won’t be the kind of back-slapping that we saw when Lula was there,” said Sweig, who is the author of several publications on Brazil and Cuba. “Precisely because of Dilma’s history and her explicit sensitivity to human rights I think she is well positioned for political dialogue.”

    Cuba’s government relies on beatings, short-term detentions, forced exile and travel restrictions to repress virtually all forms of political dissent, New York-based Human Rights Watch said in a report this month. Cuba denies it’s holding any political prisoners and considers dissident activity to be counterrevolutionary.

    In the run-up to Rousseff’s arrival yesterday, Brazilian newspapers published almost-daily interviews with Sanchez and activists from groups including the Ladies in White, in which they called for a meeting with the president’s delegation.

    Any such requests will be studied by Brazil’s Embassy in Havana, the foreign ministry said in a statement. Rousseff’s agenda doesn’t include any meetings with activists, and underscoring the commercial nature of the visit, her human rights minister is not among the cabinet officials and business leaders making up her delegation.

    CLICK LINK FOR ENTIRE ARTICLE!

    http://www.businessweek.com/news/2012-01-31/rousseff-in-cuba-points-to-u-s-rights-record-at-guantanamo-bay.html

  24. BUT I THOUGHT LETTING THE HAIRDRESSERS AND SHOE SHINE BOYS HAVE THEIR INDEPENDENT BUSINESS WOULD GET CUBA’S ECONOMY UP AND RUNNING LIKE A FINE TUNED MACHINE IN NO TIME!!!! SO DISAPPOINTED!!

    REUTERS: Cuba reports big increase in food prices – By Marc Frank

    Cubans paid almost 20 percent more for food in 2011 as economic reforms, reduced imports and stagnating farm production touched off price inflation at the country’s many produce markets.

    The National Statistics Office reported on its website (ONE.CU) that meat prices rose 8.7 percent while produce prices were up 24.1 percent, for an average of 19.8 percent.

    The report was bad news for President Raul Castro, who has been loosening the state’s grip on farming and retail food services and sales as it seeks to reform its Soviet-style economy by allowing more private initiative and market forces to kick in.

    The changes are part of more than 300 reforms adopted by the ruling Communist Party last year to “update” the economy, which authorities have warned will entail a difficult transition.

    Similar reforms in other state-monopolized economies have proved inflationary in the early stages, but the Cuban government hoped increased output would mitigate price increases.

    President Castro has made agricultural reform and increased food production a top priority since taking over for ailing brother Fidel Castro in 2008.

    But agricultural output increased just 2 percent last year, after falling 2.5 percent in 2010 and remains below 2005 levels.

    At the same time, Castro has cut food imports to reduce spending by the debt-ridden government. Because of low farm output, Cuba imports a budget-busting 60 percent to 70 percent of the food it consumes.

    Castro also has allowed farmers to sell a growing percentage of their production for whatever price the market will bear.

    Rising prices have provoked much grumbling from Cubans, whose buying power has shrunk under Castro’s changes.

    “Everything is going up, except wages. What I bought yesterday for a peso, today costs 1.10 pesos or 1.20 pesos, but I continue to earn the same,” said a Havana office worker who gave her name only as Angelina.

    While all Cubans get a subsidized monthly food ration, it is not enough to get by, so they must purchase additional food at the produce markets or other places not included in the statistics office report.

    The increased prices are sure to have a big impact on the estimated 40 percent of the population who rely on state wages or pensions and do not have access to other sources of income, such as remittances from relatives abroad.

    The average wage increased only a few percentage points to the equivalent of $19 per month in 2011, the government reported, while pensions, which average just over the equivalent of $10 dollars per month, remained the same.

    “There is no doubt prices are rising, and from what I can see on the news the problem is worldwide,” Yoandry Leyva, who sells plumbing and other supplies in eastern Santiago de Cuba, said in a telephone interview.

    “But I live in Cuba and the problems are mine. Every day the prices go up and I keep earning the same. I hope they settle down because every day is more difficult,” he said.

    (Editing by Jeff Franks; Editing by Sandra Maler)

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/01/31/us-cuba-inflation-idUSTRE80U1TS20120131

  25. Humberto, a non-violent revolution can happen only when the tyrants agree to step down. It is not the case in Cuba.

  26. ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION:Brazil prez: Blogger’s travel for Cuba to decide

    HAVANA — Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff says her country acted properly in granting a visa to a dissident Cuban blogger, but says it’s an internal Cuban matter as to whether blogger Yoani Sanchez is allowed to leave the country. Rousseff says it’s not her place to raise human rights concerns during a visit to the island. She met with Cuban President Raul Castro on a trip focused on trade and cooperation. Rousseff says “he who throws the first stone has a roof made of glass. We in Brazil have ours.” Rousseff spoke Tuesday to Brazilian journalists accompanying her on a tour of Cuba and Haiti. Her comments were reported by state news service Agencia Brasil. Lack of official permission has prevented Sanchez from making other trips abroad.
    http://www.ajc.com/news/nation-world/brazil-prez-bloggers-travel-1323929.html

  27. YOUTUBE: DOCUMENTARY- Gene Sharp – “How to Start a Revolution” (trailer)

    Gene Sharp (born January 21, 1928) is Professor Emeritus of political science at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.[2] He is known for his extensive writings on nonviolent struggle, which have influenced numerous anti-government resistance movements around the world. Sharp was born in Ohio,[1] the son of an itinerant Protestant minister.[3] He received a Bachelor of Arts in Social Sciences in 1949 from Ohio State University, where he also received his Master of Arts in Sociology in 1951.[4] In 1953-54, Sharp was jailed for nine months after protesting the conscription of soldiers for the Korean War.[1] In 1968, he received a Doctor of Philosophy in political theory from Oxford University.[4] Sharp has been a professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth since 1972. He simultaneously held research appointments at Harvard University’s Center for International Affairs since 1965.[1] In 1983 he founded the Albert Einstein Institution, a non-profit organization devoted to studies and promotion of the use of nonviolent action in conflicts worldwide.[5] In 2009 he was nominated for the Nobel peace prize. [6]

  28. PLEASE PASS ALONG THIS VIDEO DOCUMENTARY TO OTHERS AND EVEN BETTER THOSE IN CUBA!

    YOUTUBE: DOCUMENTAL : Manual “De la Dictadura a la Democracia” (2012) – Gene Sharp recoge en su manual “De la dictadura a la democracia” 198 tácticas para iniciar una revolución con métodos no violentos.

  29. ***
    Everyone has to find a job to live. In whatever way they can. A basic law of life.
    ***
    Todos tienean que encontrar un trabajo para vivir. En cualquier modo que puedan. Un ley basico de la vida.
    ***
    John Bibb
    ***

  30. Mr. C Libre, nobody know the percentage of Cubans who do drugs because gathering statistics in Cuba is a state crime. So I can’t compare. But from the number of drunks I’ve seen there, Cuba’s use of mind-numbing drugs is very high.

    I didnt’ call you insane, that is what you called me in previous posts because I disagreed with you. So please take Hank’s astute observations like a man.

    For some people, Charles Manson is a hero. For others, Castro. The analogy is that they are both completely power-mad and delusional, and destroyed the lives of others. There are very good reasons most Cubans hate Castro.

  31. Instead of criticising the street vendors, you should look up to them for they have the courage to get up and go do something to better their lifestyle. On my las trip to Cuba I went to visit a town called Moron. While visiting the town there was an old man selling roasted peanuts. How could you not encourage him. Contrary to the lazy “Generation Y” he would get up every morning, roast his peanuts and walk the city center all day trying to make some extra money. Then you have the old men who make birds and crickets from palm leaves. Them you have the old men and women making straw hats. Then you have the old men and women making straw brooms and bags. Then you have the new Generation, the one right after the “Generation Y”. They to find ways to better their fate, either by selling cigars, flowers, or used caps given to them by tourists. And last of all you have the “Generation Y” of course. The ones between 30 and 45 years old. They sit around all day under the shade of a palm tree or a veranda. The guys drink their pure rum all day and critisize the government for their state. The women walk around with their new born babies saying “oh look at me I have a baby, please spare some pesos”. Give me a break. I much rather encourage the old man selling roasted peanuts for he has the heart to improve his way of life.

  32. Don`t worry about me Mr Help and Hank, I am perfectly sane. It`s just like Damir says, every time someone see`s things the way they are instead of seeing things the way you see them, they are insane.
    And how pray tell can you compare a hero and legend like Mr. Castro to Charles Manson. You seem to be obsessed with Charles Manson, every time you make a post its always in reference to him. Difference between Mr. Castro and Manson is Fidel put his life on the line to free Cuba from the imperialist monster that was eating it alive, as for Manson he was an L.S.D.freak and a heroine addict who while he was on a bad trip would eat his victims alive.
    oh and by the way maybe you can look up the statistics to see what percentage of the population of capitalist countries that take drugs, and then look up the percentage of Cubans that do drugs. I guess Mr. Castro must be doing something right huh.

  33. Cubans are sick and tired of Fidel’s “visions”, Mr. C Libre.

    Charles Manson had “visions” too, but the world is better with him locked up.

  34. You seem to have a bit of personal experience with moonshine. It shows based on the incoherence of your statements. Are you sure you haven’t been brain damaged by antifreeze, methanol or lead in the moonshine you’ve been drinking? You might want to get that checked out, Cuba Libre.

  35. And then you wonder why Mr. Castro`s vision for “a Cuba for the Cubans” doesn`t seem to be materializing. A summum has been reached. Now they are getting too lazy even to go to the market to buy their food supplies. Why bother to get up and walk to the market, I`ll just sit around under my banana tree and drink my moonshine rum all day, the bicycle vendor will come around.

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