The Foreign Investment Law: Jumping Beyond Its Own Shadow? / Yoani Sanchez

A gentleman with a beard and a shabby shirt reads the newspaper in a Reina street doorway. “These people are re-inventing the wheel…” I can hear him say. The daily he has in his hands has a tabloid insert with the new Foreign Investment Law, recently voted on in the National Assembly. Unanimously approved, the controversial legislation comes at a time when the Cuban economy is in desperate need of foreign capital.

The rush to get investment has not caused, however, greater flexibility in areas such as contracting for personnel. The recently approved law will maintain the state’s monopoly as the employing company. Only through this entity will a foreign business be able to contract for its workers. People trusted by the government will continue to rise to the top of the list it’s time to get hired.

Thus, Raul Castro’s government guarantees that the workforce of foreign investors will be people the government trusts. If we understand that economic autonomy is an indispensable requisite to achieving political autonomy, we know very well that the General President is going to assure that the best salaries are going to go to the pockets of the proven faithful. In this way he maintains the ability to buy loyalty with privileges, which has characterized the Cuban model.

However, ideological fidelity and working ability don’t always go hand-in-hand. New businesses with foreign capital will see their performance hampered–among other reasons–by not having access to the best available human capital. On this point it’s clear that the Foreign Investment Law can’t jump beyond its own shadow. It continues to be marked by the fear that individuals can make themselves independent–both with regards to wages and politics–from the state.

25 thoughts on “The Foreign Investment Law: Jumping Beyond Its Own Shadow? / Yoani Sanchez

  1. BRINGING DOLLARS TO CUBA

    Young South Africans, who are leaving shortly for Cuba to study medicine there, will get the opportunity to study at what has been claimed to be the biggest medical school in the world.

    Doctor Sanele Madela,who studied in Cuba in 2002, helped orientate a group of young people from KwaZulu-Natal who are leaving for the Caribbean Island on Monday.

    He told them they would not get the same opportunity in South Africa. Cuba’s Latin American School of Medicine enrolls about 12 000 students a year as opposed to the 1600 in South Africa.

    “The Cubans are very, very strict and you will actually go home if you don’t do the things that are expected of you as a student. But, at the same time, they are very supportive. Academically, when you are struggling academically, you don’t need to fail two tests. They pick you up so carefully and so quickly and then they form support structures around you,” says the South African official.

  2. Havana’s Ernesto Oviedo, the 77-year-old maestro of boleros, makes his U.S. debut under his own name at an intimate sit-down concert Sunday at La Casa de Cultura Brazilian, 1901 San Pablo Ave., accompanied by a top-shelf Bay Area ensemble featuring Santos, Marco Diaz on piano and trumpet, bassist Saul Sierra, guitarist Jose Roberto, saxophonist/flutist Melecio Magdaluyo, and percussionist Javier Navarrette.

    Santos featured Oviedo last month at a sold-out SFJAZZ Center performance by his Filosofía Caribeña project, an unexpected addition to a program already brimming with brilliant artists. Although unknown to the vast majority of the audience, he earned a rapturous standing ovation with his soul-bearing renditions of the Latin American standards “Alma Mia” and “Convergencia” (performed as a duo with Diaz).

    “He brought the house down,” Santos says. “He was the perfect addition to the program, representing the elders. His depth of knowledge is really exceptional. He knew both the composer and lyricist of ‘Convergencia’ personally. It’s a tricky song. Every bar is a new chord, and he makes it sound effortless.”

    Ernesto’s father was the pioneering tres master composer Isaac Oviedo, an important voice in the golden age of son, and his brother is Papi Oviedo, who tours with the Buena Vista Social Club and vocalist Omara Portuondo. He’s also well versed in son, but Ernesto made his mark as a preeminent interpreter of romantic boleros, the heart-on-sleeve ballads honed to poetic perfection in Havana and Mexico City and beloved across Latin America. Santos first met Oviedo, who is best known as a long-time member of the legendary Orquesta Estrellas Cubanas, on a trip to the island in 1990.

    “He’s like my Cuban father,” Santos says. “He opened his home and family to me. I got to tour with him a little bit in Germany about 10 years ago, but he had never been to the United States before. I found out he was coming to Miami to visit his daughter, who he hadn’t seen in 35 years. I have a student who knows Ernesto through me, and he offered to get him a plane ticket out here. I knew I had to incorporate him into the Filosofía Caribeña show, but it was too late to get him into the publicity.”

    The day before the SFJAZZ show, Santos brought Oviedo and his band into the studio. With no recordings available in the US and precious few under his own name in Cuba, Oviedo is ripe for discovery and now Santos is planning to release an album featuring the elegant singer.

    “We’re hoping to bring him back, and do a concert that promotes the album,” Santos says. “Like a lot of the musicians in the Buena Vista Social Club, Ernesto has been on the quiet side. He’s worked all these years, but always as one of the singers in a group and never led his band. I think it’s time that changed.”

  3. DREAM ON Omar Fundora! THE CASTRO OLIGARCHY MAFIA ARE A BUNCH OF DEADBEATS WHO WILL RENEGE ON THEIR PROMISES AND PUT ANYONE, INCLUDING BUSINESS PARTNERS IN JAIL! UNTIL THERE IS SEPARATION OF POWERS AND MULTI-PARTY ELECTIONS THOSE INVESTING IN CUBA ARE MORE LIKELY TO BE BETTING IN A FIXED CASINO!

    THE ECONOMIST: The risk of doing business – Aug 13th 2013,

    WE HAVE received the following letter from Stephen Purvis, a British businessman who was detained in Cuba for 15 months:
    Dear Editor,

    I enjoyed reading about my misfortunes in the Economist, albeit many months after publication and in the company of fellow inmates in the Cuban high security prison, La Condesa. I would ask you to correct the impression that you give in the May 9th 2012 edition and subsequent articles that I was accused and detained for corruption.

    During my 8 month interrogation in the Vila Marista I was accused of many things, starting with revelations of state secrets, but never of corruption. After a further 7 months held with a host of convicted serious criminals and a handful of confused businessmen, most of whom were in a parallel predicament to mine, I was finally charged and sentenced for participating in various supposed breaches of financial regulations. The fact that the Central bank had specifically approved the transactions in question for 12 years, and that by their sentencing the court has in effect potentially criminalised every foreign business investing or trading in Cuba was considered irrelevant by the judges. I am thankful however that the judges finally determined that my sentence should not only have with a conditional release date a few days before the trial thus conveniently justifying my 15 months in prison, but, bizarrely was to be non-custodial. So my Kafkaesque experience at the sharp end of Cuban justice ended as abruptly as it began.

    I spent time with a number of foreign businessmen arrested during 2011 and 2012 from a variety of countries, although representatives from Brazil, Venezuela and China were conspicuous in the absence. Very few of my fellow sufferers have been reported in the press and there are many more in the system than is widely known. As they are all still either waiting for charges, trial or sentencing they will certainly not be talking to the press. Whilst a few of them are being charged with corruption many are not and the accusations range from sabotage, damage to the economy, tax avoidance and illegal economic activity. It is absolutely clear that the war against corruption may be a convenient political banner to hide behind and one that foreign governments and press will support. But the reasons for actively and aggressively pursuing foreign business are far more complicated. Why for example is the representative of Ericsson in jail for exactly the same activities as their Chinese competitor who is not? Why for example was one senior European engineer invited back to discuss a potential new project only to be arrested for paying technical workers five years ago when he was a temporary resident in Cuba?

    CLICK LINK FOR ENTIRE LETTER!

    http://www.economist.com/blogs/americasview/2013/08/foreign-investment-cuba

  4. PBS NEWSHOUR VIDEO: Socialism after Chavez: Political divisions deepen amid unrest in Venezuela. – It’s been a year since Venezuela’s Nicolas Maduro — the hand-picked successor of long-time, charismatic leader Hugo Chavez — entered office. Demonstrations against rising crime have mushroomed into massive marches over insecurity, scarcity and demonstrator arrests. Chief foreign correspondent Margaret Warner reports on the basic difficulties facing the citizens of Venezuela.
    CLICK LINK FOR VIDEO AND TRANSCRIPT!
    http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/socialism-chavez-political-divisions-deepen-amid-unrest-venezuela/

  5. humberto: I read the article, but, I also read a statement made by Cuban government prior to the Mariel Port opening ceremonies….we really need to wait until the currency unification in 2016 to see how it all going to play out…I think if the currency unification really takes place, the average Cuban citizen is going to benefit from this…the situation in Venezuela, the European Union participation in investment in Cuba and Chinese willingness to lend money to Cuba…Russia may not be a big factor in Cuba investment, they have their hands full with the changing economic environment for them in Eurasia. Brazil’s economy is weakening, so foreign investments may be affected…..the least worry for the Cuban is the Cuban government continue to pay them the same was they were paid prior to the Raul Castro reforms of 2011….

  6. FILM MAKERS IN CUBA COMPLAINING ABOUT CERTAIN RESTRICTIONS

    Two feature films and a short film by an independent producer did not get permits despite having the necessary financing to start filming. The denial was issued by the Ministry of the Interior (MININT in Spanish), the entity that for several months has been reviewing the scripts and the composition of the technical teams for cinematic projects being developed on the island.

    Previously, the Cuban Institute of Cinematographic Art and Industry (ICAIC in Spanish) and the Ministry of Culture were responsible for the review and approval of the scripts.

    To demonstrate their discontent with the new measure, several filmmakers sent a letter to ICAIC and the Ministry of Culture. Jorge Perugorría, prominent Cuban filmmaker and star of the film “Fresa y Chocolate” [Strawberry and Chocolate], said [es] there was “a common opinion” among artists that no agency other than the ICAIC or the Ministry of Culture should revise the stories to be filmed.

    In statements to the Spanish daily newspaper, El País [es], Perugorría added that “making movies is still somewhat difficult in Cuba, especially in a crisis because the government prioritizes other things.” However, “thanks to digital media and the ability to make low-budget films, seven or eight a year are still made within a very interesting independent cinema, which can be seen in the sampling from this budding cinema.”

    Meanwhile, the independent producer Claudia Calviño added the high costs to obtain permits to film in certain parts of the country to the limitations that currently hinder Cuban cinema. “The Office of the City Historian imposes fees of 500 CUC [Cuban convertible peso] per hour of shooting in the historic center of Old Havana,” Calvino said. According to filmmaker Enrique Alvarez, the statement will not be made public. Alvarez said:

    es una declaración que hemos hecho a través de nuestras instituciones, porque nos interesaba que nuestras instituciones fueran las que defendieran su espacio institucional de ser quienes den o no este tipo de permiso, como ha sido hasta ahora. Y a nosotros nos tocaría ya discutir con ellos y fajarnos con ellos cada vez que den un permiso o no.

    It’s a statement that we’ve made through our institutions, because we wanted our institutions to be the ones who defended their institutional place to be the ones who give or don’t give this type of permit, as it has been up until now. And it would be up to us to discuss or fight it out with them every time they give or don’t give a permit.

    In the recently concluded meeting of the Union of Writers and Artists of Cuba, Álvarez noted [es]:

    nunca como hoy la producción cinematográfica se ha extendido por todo el país. Documentales, largos y cortos de ficción se realizan en cualquier rincón con la calidad profesional suficiente como para representar a nuestra cinematografía.

    Today like never before, film production has spread across the country. Documentaries and fiction both short and long are made in every corner, with enough professional quality to represent our cinematography.

  7. DEAR Omar Fundora!! DID YOU READ THE ARTICLE ON Havana Times I POSTED DEAR? OR ARE YOU BLIND? THE CATROFASCISTS OFF THE BAT ARE GETTING MORE THAN 50% OF THE SALARIES OF THE CUBAN WORKERS IN THE MARIEL PORT. WITH A “SPECIAL” EXCHANGE RATE OF 10 pesos FOR EACH $1 THEY ARE CUTTING THE SALARIES OF THE WORKERS MORE THAN IN HALF. THE OTHER 15% WILL BE FOR REGULAR “TAXES” AND MISCELLANEOUS RIP OFFS BY THE CASTRO FAMILY OLIGARCHY MAFIA. REMEMBER THAT CURRENTLY THE CUBAN PESO IS 26 PESOS TO ONE DOLLAR DEAR! YOU DO THE MATH!

  8. ***
    HI NICK–it’s curious that you mention Ukraine! Who suspected that Russki Vladimir Putin was a U.S. right wing imperialist! The Castro Brothers have done great work implementing their own “apartheid” system over the last 50+ years of dictatorship there. I want to see the Cuban People free and in control of their own government. You seem to want them to stay in communist chains forever under Regime control. The new “Equal opportunity” apartheid that Yoani Sanchez writes about every week!
    ***
    HOLA NICK– es curioso que estas mencionando Ukraine! Quien sospecho que Russki Vladimir Putin es un U.S. imperialista del derecho! Los Hermanos Castros hicieran muy buen trabajo implementando su sistema de “apartheid” en Cuba durante los ultimos 50+ anos alla. Quiero ver La Gente Cubana libre y en control de su mismo gobierno. Parace que quieres verlos en cadenas communistas para siempre abajo de control del Regime. El “Opportunity igual” apartheid de que escribe Yoani Sanchez cada semana!
    ***
    Rocketman
    ***

  9. Humbertocapiro: In 2016 the elimination of the multiple currency system is scheduled to occur…the Cuban government plans to let Cuban workers keep most of the pay they will receive from foreign investors in Cuba…..

  10. John Bibb: thanks to the internet… the lies of Right Wing Propaganda don’t hide the truth about the apartheid and exploitation of man by man the Right Wing model of governance is all about…the executions that took place after the 1959 revolution were applauded by the Cuban People…and historical archives confirm that we, the American People, have killed more people around the World then anybody else in modern history….every generation since 1862 has had to fight in some type of war or conflict because our leaders keep wanting to change the World. Ever since the fall of the Soviet Union we have increased our army of covert CIA, DEA and other organizations ranks with the purpose of de-stabilized government, overthrow them and support stooges under the banner of democratic republics. Ukraine, Mexico, Egypt, Iraq and Libya are present examples. If you notice three of the above mentioned countries, oil is the main export…whoever controls the flow of oil controls the World. Europe is getting all the oil they want now from Libya and American companies control oil fields in Mexico. Why is this necessary??….to apply economic pressure on Russia…Germany depends presently on Russian oil and gas, but, if we control oil fields in Libya and Mexico, we can leverage Russian oil sales in Europe. Ukraine is now going to buy oil and gas from Europe instead of Russia…guess where the oil and gas comes from…. We are an Empire thanks to the White control of wealth and power in our country that is projected through the Right Wing Party ….the Republican Party…the patrons of the Miami Cuban Right Wingers who want to bring the past apartheid economic system back to Cuba….

  11. ***
    HI NICK–the USA punishes our soldiers who commit atrocities. We hung almost 100 of them during WW2. Castro gives promotions to his murderers.
    ***
    HOLA NICK–Los Estados Unidos castiga nuestras soldados quienes abusan gente. Colgamos casi 100 de ellos durante WW2. Castro da promociones a sus matadores.
    ***
    John Bibb
    ***

  12. THERE IS ALWAYS A “CATCH” WITH THE CASTRO FAMILY OLIGARCHY MAFIA! YOU GET HIRED THRU THEM AND THEN THEY TAKE 70% OF YOUR SALARY! BUT THAT’S SLAVE OWNERS AND MAFIOSOS WORK!

    HAVANA TIMES: Cuba’s Mariel Development Zone Unmasked – by Pedro Campos

    Ana Teresa Igarza, director general of the Mariel Special Development Zone (ZEDM) Regulations Office, recently announced that a special hard-currency exchange rate had been established for Zone employees. Contracted employees will receive 80 percent of the salaries agreed to by Cuban employment agencies and investors, and payments are to be made in regular Cuban pesos (CUP), at a “special” exchange rate of 1 Cuban Convertible Peso (CUC) to 10 CUP. This is as “special” as the Special Period.

    Ana Teresa Igarza, director general of the Mariel Special Development Zone (ZEDM) Regulations Office, recently announced that a special hard-currency exchange rate had been established for Zone employees.

    Contracted employees will receive 80 percent of the salaries agreed to by Cuban employment agencies and investors, and payments are to be made in regular Cuban pesos (CUP), at a “special” exchange rate of 1 Cuban Convertible Peso (CUC) to 10 CUP. This is as “special” as the Special Period.

    That is to say, if the employment agency negotiates a 1,000 CUC salary (or its equivalent in US dollars) for a Cuban worker, the agency will pocket the 1,000 CUC (or its equivalent in US dollars) and pay the Cuban worker (in CUP) 80 percent of the sum agreed to, at the special exchange rate of 10 CUP to 1 CUC.
    This means that, of the 1,000 CUC (or their equivalent in US dollars) paid by the investor, Cuban workers will only receive 32%. To this, we must add that the wage worker must pay an additional 5 percent for State “social security”, which means that they are ultimately only receiving 27 percent of the original 1,000 CUC. A total of 63 percent will go to the State, which will sit back and not “get its hands dirty” – it will pocket this only for acting as an “intermediary” between the investor, a euphemism for a foreign capitalist exploiter, and Cuban salaried workers.

    CLICK LINK FOR ENTIRE ARTICLE!

    http://www.havanatimes.org/?p=103105

  13. AWW Nick!! STARTING THE WEEKEND WRONG LISTENING TO ANOTHER OF YOUR BAD, “BAD OLD U.S.A.” RENDITION! DUDE IS THAT BARREL OF RESPONSES IS SO EMPTY?

  14. Hank,
    You completely failed to understand my remark which mentioned 4 of the very Greatest American poets.
    If you can’t comprehend fairly uncomplicated English phraseology, then perhaps I should not pour scorn. Perhaps to pour scorn is not fair. Perhaps, bearing this in mind, should simplify my diction yet further.
    On the other hand Hank, if you realise that you have made an obvious error and try to cover it over by blabbering on about Hitler and all those oft-mentioned bozos yet again, then that’s your problem not mine.
    Either way I wish you a Happy Easter Weekend Hank.

  15. Mr John Bibb.
    Yet again I will make it clear that I have nothing against USA or its people.
    However it is a blatant fact that the USA has committed infinitely more acts of butchery than Cuba over the past 55 years.
    You think Che Guevara killed a lot of people.
    Think how many more he would have killed if he had sprayed villages of men, women, children and babies with napalm…
    The USA is a superpower with an empire.
    It has committed many atrocities over the past 55 years.
    All empires commit atrocities.

  16. The condom crisis is assuredly a master stroke (pun intended) of the United States CIA, FBI, and NSA combined with USAID. This terrorist combo is using the United States embargo to halt all shipments of condoms combined with all raw materials used in their manufacture from Cuba’s fair shores. The plan is to cause a rapid increase in the Cuban birthrate, thus causing massive shortages of everything. Soon the embargo will begin to work after 50 + years.

  17. THE CASTRO OLIGARCHY MAFIA SHOULD TAKE SOME OF THE MONEY FROM THEIR SWISS ACCOUNTS AND BUY SOME CONDOMS FOR THE EVERYDAY CUBAN CITIZEN!

    THE GUARDIAN UK: Cuba’s condom shortage raises fears of imminent health crisis Country’s condom providers cannot match demand, reports say, as residents search the island for dwindling supply – by Richard Luscombe

    From potatoes to deodorant, toilet paper and bottled beer, Cubans have come to accept chronic shortages as an inevitable part of life after more than half a century of communist rule.

    Now a shrinking supply of condoms has upset residents of the Caribbean island nation and alarmed health officials who are worried by the possibility of an increase in sexually transmitted diseases and unwanted pregnancies.

    Pharmacies in the central province of Villa Clara began running out of condoms in the middle of last month, according to Cuban bloggers reporting on the crisis, with shortages spreading to other towns and villages, and suburbs of the capital Havana in recent weeks.

    One of the worst affected areas, the observers say, is the city of Santa Clara, which already has one of the highest rates of HIV infection on the island. They say that Cenesex, the state-run Cuban national centre for sex education, which is headed by President Raul Castro’s daughter, Mariela, has ordered the dwindling supplies to be allocated to areas of greatest need, including known carriers of HIV.

    As a result, regular citizens visiting pharmacies in search of condoms are finding empty shelves, according to evidence collected by Havana blogger Polina Martínez Shvietsova, who conducted an ad-hoc survey.

    She said called a number of pharmacy owners in several areas, who all told her: “We don’t have any, and we don’t know when we’ll get some.”

    CLICK LINK FOR ENTIRE ARTICLE!

    http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/apr/18/cuba-condom-shortage-health-crisis

  18. ***
    HI NICK–Go check out the execution wall where Che shot thousands of Cuban men, women, and children. Look at the many videos posted here about the Cuban torture chambers and the abuses of their citizens.
    ***
    The Castro Brother’s Cuban butchers are far worse than the U.S.A. ever was when the populations of both countries are included. The U.S. population is more than 30 times bigger than Cuba’s is. The Castros have many more victims.
    ***
    HOLA NICK–Investiga el pared de execuciones donde Che tiraba milles de hombres, mujeres, y ninos Cubanos. Vea los muchos videos puestos aqui tratando de los camaras be tortura y los abusos de los ciduanos Cubanos.
    ***
    Los carniceros de los Hermanos Castro son mucho peores que los Estados Unidos cuando los populaciones de los dos paises son incluido. La populacion de Los Estados Unidos es mas que 30 veces mas grande que la populacion de Cuba. Los Castros tienan muchos mas victimas.
    ***
    John Bibb
    ***

  19. ***
    HI OMAR FUNDORA–I’ll start investing in the Cuban Economy–when the Castro Brothers Government is buried 6 feet deep! Who has trust in an evil government who treats 80 percent of it’s Citizens as state slaves?
    ***
    You live in the best and richest country in the world–the USA. Cuba is poor thanks to the Castro Brothers and communism. It isn’t caused by evil imperialist capitalists! The commies destroyed and continue to destroy the Cuban economy. For more than 50 years already!
    ***
    HOLA OMAR FUNDORA–Empezare poniendo mis inversionces en la Economia Cubana–cuando los Hermanos Castros son enterrados 6 pies de profundo! Quien tiene confianza en un gobierno malo que trata 80 porciento de sus Ciudanos como esclavos del estado?
    ***
    Vives en el pais mas bueno y rico en el mundo–Los Estados Unidos. Cuba es pobre gracias a los Hermanos Castros y communismo. No es causado por malos capitalistas imperialisticas! Los commies destruiran y seguien destruirendo la economia Cubana. Ya por mas que 50 anos!
    ***
    John Bibb
    ***

  20. The collectives in Cuba are more important to the Cuban government then the self-employed. They learned from studying Capitalistic societies and Cuba’s own past where the centralization of wealth and power left the majority of Cubans living without education, healthcare and poverty while 10/20% of the population lived very well. They don’t want the inequality that we live under in the United States to repeat itself in Cuba (GDP in U.S. 16 Trillion Dollars; GDP in Cuba a fraction of this…but, we live in a country of great inequality in comparison to what the reforms plan of 2011 want to achieve in Cuba…this is a measure of better governance than us …our government don’t really care how bad the inequality problem gets because between the 1% and the government they have full control of the country and are not afraid of the People…our government is perfectly happy to have a 6% of the population permanently unemployed, a retail industry, which does not pay enough to live on, the U.S. government the biggest employer in the U.S. and some 37 Million Americans requiring welfare to live all this while only focusing on the quality of life of 30% of us who earn the top incomes in the country. The other 67% are living in economic prisons because the $67000 per household average is only enough to sleep, go to work and buy six pack of beer and drink it while watching t.v., using cell phones or the computer….no wonder we are all so fat….very little time or money to do anything else…we have a price for everything we do thanks to Capitalism…)

  21. Hank,

    Strange, but even as a right-wing militaristic dupe, as Nick has called me, I have never fantasized about blowing Cessnas out of the sky.

    But apparently pro-Castro pacifists enjoy blowing up Cessnas.

    Maybe it’s a peaceful thing to do, I don’t know.

  22. I like Yoani’s post.

    Economic autonomy poses 2 threats to the regime:

    1) The Castro regime relied on its business monopoly to threaten Cubans with unemployment and starvation. This was Castro’s major weapon in keeping Cubans in line. Not so easy when independent business will hire anybody, even if it’s under the table.

    2) The Castro military business monopoly does not want any competition from other Cubans, either in labor or prices.

    Can’t see any of this changing quickly.

    Foreign multinationals are welcome in Cuba, but a small Cuban businessman still faces suffocating restrictions and taxation.

  23. Why do you hate poets and the USA, Nick?

    You responded to Simba’s correct observation that you have nothing worthwhile to say by insulting him and poets.

    Why didn’t you say instead

    Simba, My Dear Old Chap,
    Nick Sez;
    If ‘having nothing worthwhile to say’ were to be established as an art form to compare with…
    lets say…
    [dictatorships]….
    …then you would be right up there with the likes of [Castro, Hitler, Stalin, Mugabe, Bashar Al-Assad, Kim Jung-Il, and Qaddafi].

    The reason you did not say that is you like dictatorships and you don’t like the USA or poets.

    By the way, how’s that fantasy you have of blowing people out of the sky? Have you seen anyone about it to get help yet?

  24. Oh bless your little heart Hank,
    You never seem short of ways in which to outdo yourself when it comes to utterly useless dunderheaded remarks.
    You misinterpret my last comment as an attack on poets ???
    Really ????
    Are you really and truly so overwhelmingly dim-witted ?????
    Then, to compound this abject failure to read plain and simple English, you bleat on about some classic Hank-style outrage regarding ’55 years of outright murder, assassination, torture, imprisonment’
    Very simple little question for you Hank:
    Over the past 55 years which country has committed by far and away the most ‘outright murder, assassination, torture, imprisonment’ – USA or Cuba ?
    I’ll make it even easier for you Hank and I’ll give you a clue:
    The answer ain’t Cuba….

  25. Yoani …you are offering an opinion that leads the reader to believe that corruption in Cuba is inevitable when it comes to the privilege to work for a foreign company, according to you, the hiring process will be a corrupted process because a Cuban government organization will be doing the work of an employment agency to match employee skills to the jobs needed in the foreign business. But, the new investment law also allows for the self employed to be part of the pool of Cuban workers that will be selected. If the foreign investors cannot find a Cuban employee with the skills required to do the job in Cuba, they can bring their own employee from the pool of workers that exist in the World ( maybe not an American, but, this is the U.S. fault because of the embargo). Corruption in this hiring process will depend on who the people in this Cuban organization are. The truth is that the corruption that you are predicting exist in the private sector as well as government all over the World. I think you need to wait and see how all of this is going to work, before you make predictions about corruption because of past history. A follow up story to your blog above in your new digital newspaper could be an excellent venue for you to prove the prediction you are making above.

Comments are closed.