Carlitos’ Body Language

Yoani Sánchez, Havana, 1 July 2014 – I remember him well, leaning over the table with head bowed and a vacant look. Carlitos was barely twenty and his every gesture carried the reluctance of someone who had lived too much. The young man ended up emigrating – like so many others – and I suppose there is little time in his new life to let the hours pass lying around bored. However, I continue to see this physical image of apathy and a lack of personal projects everywhere I look. It’s as if the body is speaking and, with its posture, it is saying what so many mouths remain silent about.

Someday when a Cuban body language glossary is prepared, it will include this pose of “falling into the abyss of nothingness.” This appearance of already being defeated, like Carlitos, that so many young people and not so young people present in this country. It’s the nuisance of moving your hands, the droopy eyelids, the permanent drowsiness and a certain relaxation of the lips which barely articulate lazy words, when they are not reduced to simple monosyllables. That the clock is ticking doesn’t matter, life passes and it doesn’t matter, the country slips through our fingers and people couldn’t care less.

While the heroes stand proudly on their marble pedestals, reality finds us bent over, tired, throwing ourselves on the first piece of furniture we come across. Is it perhaps the rebellion of indolence? The muffled scream of disinterest? I don’t know, but everywhere there are these poses that betray a lack of personal and national dreams.

19 thoughts on “Carlitos’ Body Language

  1. The thing is that BNP could have laundered a trillion Euros for Castro, could have committed all the fraud they wanted in Europe, Africa, Asia, South America or Canada, and the US government would not even care.

    BNP and Castro could have laundered his money in Euros, Cdn $, Yen, Rubles, or Yuan.

    The joke is that Castro outlawed the US dollar in Cuba.

    Castro used to imprison Cubans for carrying just one US dollar.

    Yet he forced BNP to convert his currency into US dollars and then launder the money through the US banking system.

    This is why Cuba is such an economic basket case.

    If the socialist economy wasn’t bad enough…

    if his history of inviting foreign investors into Cuba and then stealing their money and imprisoning them wasn’t bad enough…

    Castro also forced foreign banks to do his money laundering through the US banking system.

    Why? Just his way of giving the USA the finger, no matter how much it costs Cuban investors.

    Fidel Castro was obsessed with his war against the USA.

    Remember that Jimmy Carter lifted restrictions against US travel and US spending in Cuba, and gave in to Castro regarding the Mariel boat people…

    And Castro did nothing to reciprocate.

    The same story was repeated with Clinton and with Obama.

    US telecoms were offering Castro fantastic deals to get into Cuba, but he rejected every reasonable deal.

    The younger Cuban Communists who are impatiently waiting for Castro to die might really be interested in US business.

  2. THE CASTRO OLIGARCHY MAFIA HIDING IT’S ASSETS & TRANSACTIONS!

    MIAMI HERALD: French bank handled $1.7 billion in illegal business with Cuba – by Juan Tamayo

    The largest bank in France, BNP Paribas, disguised $1.75 billion in illegal transactions with Cuban entities as part of a long string of violations of U.S. sanctions that brought it a record $8.9 billion in forfeitures and fines, according to U.S. prosecutors. A prosecution document on the case said BNP already has corrected its ways, “including terminating all business and prohibiting new business in any currency with sanctioned entities” in Cuba, Iran and Sudan. The use of such large quantities of U.S. dollars in the BNP deals is surprising because Cuban banks generally use euros to avoid U.S. blocks, said a former Havana banker who defected in 2005 and asked to remain anonymous because he still has family in Cuba.

    Although the Statement of Fact did not identify the enterprises involved in the violations, it included several examples of illegal “Cuban Credit Facilities” that showed they covered a broad range of Cuban government financial and commercial activities.

    One of the facilities involved U.S. dollar loans to a company in Netherlands to finance the company’s purchase of crude oil products that were to be refined in and sold to Cuba, according to the document.

    Another facility involved U.S. dollar loans for “one of Cuba’s largest state-owned commercial companies” identified in the document only as Cuban Corporation 1

    The facilities “were structured in highly complicated ways,” it added. And BNP employees confirmed to U.S. investigators that the complexities “had no business purpose other than to conceal the connection to Cuba.”

    It was not clear how the case would impact Cuba, already restricted by the U.S. embargo and U.S. laws and regulations on money laundering and terrorism financing. BNP shuttered its Havana office last year, after it came under U.S. investigation.

    “This is a very important bank, but it doesn’t mean other banks won’t be able to do transactions,” said Luis F. Luis, a former chief economist at the Organization of American States who follows Cuban banking.

    The bank pleaded guilty to criminal charges in New York State and is expected to plead guilty to federal charges within a few weeks.

    BNP officials knew and approved of repeated violations by leaving out the names of the sanctioned countries from transactions sent to the bank’s New York office, according to the 36-page “Statement of Fact” filed by U.S. prosecutors in New York.

    “During the course of its illicit conduct, BNP processed thousands of U.S. dollar-denominated financial transactions with Sanctioned Entities located in Cuba, with a total value in excess of $1.747 billion,” the document said. The use of U.S. dollars anywhere is subject to U.S. laws and regulations.

    That amount included more than $300 million in transactions with an enterprise identified only as “one of Cuba’s largest state-owned commercial companies” and one that is on the U.S. watch list of “Specially Designated Nationals,” the document added.

    CLICK LINK FOR ENTIRE ARTICLE!
    http://www.miamiherald.com/2014/07/02/4215549/french-bank-handled-17-billion.html

  3. THE ECONOMIST: Capital punishment France’s largest bank gets fined for evading American sanctions

    THE American guillotine has fallen. After lengthy negotiations, prosecutors and regulators announced on June 30th the penalties they planned to impose on BNP Paribas, France’s largest bank, for evading American sanctions on doing business with Cuba, Iran and the Sudan: an almost $9 billion fine, a guilty plea to criminal charges of conspiracy and falsifying records and a suspension of its right to clear certain dollar transactions.

    But the announcement raises a raft of questions about the proportionality of penalties, the responsibility of individuals in corporate crime, the duties of firms dealing with objectionable regimes and the reasonableness of America imposing its foreign policy via the international financial system and its dominant currency. The bank’s dealings with and for Sudan—where Osama bin Laden found refuge and the UN’s attempt to stem the bloodletting in Darfur was resisted—lie at the heart of the charges against it. BNP concealed a total of $190 billion-worth of dollar-based transactions between 2002 and 2012, according to New York’s Department of Financial Services (DFS), including some involving Cuba and Iran. Because they were denominated in dollars, these deals ultimately had to pass through New York and thus came under its regulatory authority. To disguise their origins, BNP stripped identifying information from documentation and re-routed payments through a network of satellite banks.

    CLICK LINK FOR ENTIRE ARTICLE!
    http://www.economist.com/news/finance-and-economics/21606321-frances-largest-bank-gets-fined-evading-american-sanctions-capital-punishment

  4. Humberto,

    Granma’s (Castro’s) recent complaint about an internet “embargo” not only contains lies, but the whole line is absurd.

    It’s like complaining that Cubans can’t buy 1984 from Barnes and Noble when Castro will arrest anyone who imports or sells 1984.

    The last guy who tried to hook up a few Cubans to the internet, so they could see sites like Google, is now spending 15 years in a Cuban jail.

    Here’s a list of the 10 most popular Android Apps in Cuba, courtesy of Yoani Sanchez

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/yoani-sanchez/the-ten-most-popular-andr_b_4581921.html

    It is illegal for Cubans (except members of the Castro gang) to have uncensored access to Wiki so an Android App like WikiDroyd is a big gift for some Cubans.

    The recent Google visit is a clear sign that the US government and Google want normal business relations with Cuba, at least regarding high tech and internet business.

    Castro has to get rid of his embargo against US business, not the other way around.

    Castro accepts trade with US agriculture and medical business, but he has no need to go beyond that.

  5. TYPICAL RESPONSE BY THE CASTRO OLIGARCHY MAFIA! IS ALWAYS SOMEONE ELSE’S FAULT! NEVER MIND THEY CENSORED ANY TYPE OF INTERNET IN THE ISLAND PRISON OF CUBA, BUT THEY CHARGE 1/3 OF AN AVERAGE CUBAN CITIZEN’S MONTH SALARY FOR ONE HOUR OF DIAL UP! FOR SENDING TEXTS IS $1!! YOU GET THE FASCIST PICTURE!

    FOX NEWS LATINO: Cuba responds to Google CEO’s call for open Internet

    The U.S. economic embargo prevents Cubans from accessing many Google services, Communist Party daily Granma said Wednesday, reacting to comments by the search giant’s chief during a recent visit to the island

    CEO Eric Schmidt and three other Google executives traveled to Cuba last week “to promote the virtues of a free and open Internet,” dissident blogger Yoani Sanchez said in a post on her site, 14ymedio.

    Cuba is “one of the few countries in the world that cannot access a good part of the services” offered by Google because the California-based company is bound by the “unjust laws” of the U.S. economic embargo, Granma said.

    Neither Android apps nor platforms such as Google Analytics are available to Internet users in Cuba, the newspaper said.

    CLICK LINK FOR ENTIRE ARTICLE!

    http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/entertainment/2014/07/02/cuba-responds-to-google-ceo-call-for-open-internet/

  6. Mario,

    By the way, do you know any tourist who has paid a 500$ fine for bringing in Cuban cigars to the USA?

    What’s the name of this person?

    I have met these jokers in Cuba and the USA.

    They are loaded with cigars and other Cuban crap when they get back to the USA. They tell customs about it and where they’ve been.

    None have ever paid 1 penny to the US government in fines.

    During the Bush years some may have been sent a warning letter, but they just threw them in the garbage.

    They’re disappointed now because the Obama admin won’t even bother sending out warning letters.

  7. Mario,

    BNP was not fined 9 billion for violating the US trade embargo against Cuba.

    This lie has been posted here many times, along with the countless other lies of the Castro propaganda machine. Even the article you linked to doesn’t claim what you say it does.

    Every non-US-based bank, including BNP, is free to do as much business with Cuba as Castro lets them.

    They are free to do as much business in the USA as they want.

    They just can’t use their US based business to do business with Cuba.

    BNP was fined for deliberately using their New York branch, which is in the USA, to launder an enormous amount of money for several terrorist states, including Iran, Cuba and the Sudan,

    But mainly they were fined because their US based business deliberately lied to the US government, practiced fraud and obstructed justice for at least a decade.

    Fines against US multinationals for violating US sanctions have almost never gone over a million dollars, which is pocket change for them.

    Red Bull was recently fined 90,000 dollars for filming in Cuba without getting a US license first.

    Red Bull could have filled out the form and got the US license to film in Cuba, but 90 thousand dollars is pocket change and they make more in free publicity by violating the sanctions.

    The minuscule amount of fines actually encourages business to continue violating trade sanctions.

  8. THE CASTRO OLIGARCHY MAFIA DOES NOT CHANGE IT’S FASCIST SPOTS! SOME “CHANGES” RIGHT? WHERE ARE ALL THE LEFTISTS IN LATIN AMERICA ON THESE HUMAN RIGHTS AND FREEDOM OF SPEECH ISSUE??

    BREIBART NEWS: Cuba Detained Almost 1,000 Dissidents in June, Tortured Political Prisoners – by Frances Martel

    While many in the mainstream media push the narrative that Cuba’s communist government is somehow more “open” than in the past, the Cuban government is exploiting that good will to violently detain and torture political dissidents. According to one NGO, 963 dissidents were arbitrarily arrested in June.

    The Cuban Commission of Human Rights and National Reconciliation, an NGO dedicated to reporting on the torture and oppression of anti-communist thought in Cuba, revealed in its monthly report that 963 individuals were arrested for political reasons in June. While this number is smaller than record-setting May, when 1,120 Cuban citizens are arrested for political reasons, the alarming rate of detention indicates that the Cuban government has no interest in a more-liberated society.

    Several individual cases of arrests stand out. Serial hunger striker and Sakharov Prize winner Guillermo Fariñas was arrested, according to the group, “almost every Monday of June … to impede scheduled meetings of his organization.” Fariñas has attempted to schedule meetings with dissidents to organize a movement against the government and has used Twitter to chronicle the beatings that he has received as the government attempts to break up those weekly meetings. On this past Monday–the last in June–Fariñas tweeted a photo of what appear to be stab wounds on his arms, from Cuban police:

    CLICK LINK FOR ENTIRE ARTICLE!

    http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Peace/2014/07/02/Cuba-Arbitrarily-Detained-Almost-1-000-Dissidents-in-June-Tortured-Political-Prisoners

  9. YOU SAY “BLOCKADE” Mario?? YOU NEED A GOOD DICTIONARY DEAR!

    A BLOCKADE is an effort to cut off food, supplies, war material or communications from a particular area by force, either in part or totally. A blockade should not be confused with an embargo or sanctions, which are legal barriers to trade, and is distinct from a siege in that a blockade is usually directed at an entire country or region, rather than a fortress or city. Most blockades historically took place at sea, blockade is still used on land to prevent someone coming into a certain area. With the blockading power can seek to cut off all maritime transport from and to the blockaded country; although stopping all land transport to and from an area may also be considered a blockade. In the 20th century air power has also been used to enhance the effectiveness of the blockade by halting all air traffic within the blockaded air space. Close patrol of the hostile ports, in order to prevent naval forces from putting to sea, is also referred to as a blockade. When coastal cities or fortresses were besieged from the landward side, the besiegers would often blockade the seaward side as well. Most recently, blockades have sometimes included cutting off electronic communications by jamming radio signals and severing undersea cables.

    U.S.-CUBA TRADE AND ECONOMIC COUNCIL, INC.
    ECONOMIC EYE ON CUBA- February 2012 – Report For Calendar Year 2011
    2011-2001 U.S. EXPORT STATISTICS FOR CUBA

    The following is the data for exports from the United States to the Republic of Cuba relating to the Trade Sanctions Reform and Export Enhancement Act (TSRA) of 2000, which re-authorized the direct commercial (on a cash basis) export of food products (including branded food products) and agricultural products (commodities) from the United States to the Republic of Cuba, irrespective of purpose. The TSRA does not include healthcare products, which remain authorized by the Cuban Democracy Act (CDA) of 1992.

    The data represents the U.S. Dollar value of product exported from the United States to the Republic of Cuba under the auspice of TSRA. The data does not include transportation charges, bank charges, or other costs associated with exports from the United States to the Republic of Cuba. The government of the Republic of Cuba reports data that, according to the government of the Republic of Cuba, includes transportation charges, bank charges, and other costs. However, the government of the Republic of Cuba has not provided verifiable data. The use of trade data reported by the government of the Republic of Cuba is suspect. The government of the Republic of Cuba has been asked to provide verifiable data, but has not.

    CLICK LINK FOR ENTIRE REPORT!

    http://www.cubatrade.org/CubaExportStats.pdf

  10. YOU WANT TO DO BUSINESS WITH THE CASTRO OLIGARCHY MAFIA?? GOOD LUCK!

    ABC NEWS: Company Defends Canadian Exec in Cuba Graft Case – by Peter Orsi

    The company and family of a Canadian business executive awaiting a court ruling in Cuba defended him against accusations of graft, arguing that what were in fact “legitimate commercial transactions” were wrongly characterized as corrupt at trial.

    A two-page statement sent to The Associated Press by the Tokmakjian Group also complained that company president Cy Tokmakjian’s trial, which ended June 21, was unfairly stacked against him.

    It said he was held without charge for two years while the results of the investigation were kept secret, and then given just two months to present a defense. Meanwhile 14 of 18 proposed defense witnesses, including international tax experts, were rejected by the court without explanation.

    “We are concerned that the outcome of the trial is predetermined given the reluctance by the Cuban authorities to rectify gross procedural mistakes,” the statement said.

    On Monday, Communist Party newspaper Granma said Tokmakjian was accused of corruption to obtain benefits in contract negotiations, unauthorized financial transactions, illegally taking large amounts of money out of the country, falsifying documents to avoid taxes and payroll irregularities. A ruling is expected soon.

    Tokmakjian is among a number of foreigners and dozens of Cubans arrested in 2011 as part of a high-profile crackdown on graft that targeted multiple businesses operating in the country.

    Another Canadian, Sarkis Yacoubian of Tri-Star Caribbean, was sentenced to nine years in 2013 but freed earlier this year and allowed to return home.

    Cuban officials did not immediately respond to a request for comment Wednesday.

    CLICK LINK FOR ENTIRE ARTICLE!
    http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/company-defends-canadian-exec-cuba-graft-case-24398859

  11. Fernando,

    There are no yankee ships blockading Cuban trade. There have never been. Like there are no CIA-agents in dark glasses bringing cash to the anti-cuban bloggers.

    The blockade works by the way of sanctions placed by the US Justice Department on citizens and institutions, american or non-american.

    A traveller bringing cigars from Cuba may only pay a small $500 fine. A bank, like the French BNP recently, $9 000 000 000 (nine billions). Read more:

    https://news.yahoo.com/french-bank-bnp-guilty-us-sanctions-violations-210001249–finance.html

  12. Fernando Leanme,

    It’s good to hear your stories about Cuba. More Cubans should post here.

    Between Castro’s paid internet trolls and the deluded armchair socialists who post their fantasies here, there isn’t much real about Cuba in the comments.

    I will add that there never has been a full US embargo against Cuba.

    The US government always offered Cuba direct food and medical aid even during the missile crisis, and Americans have always found it easy to go to Cuba through third countries.

    These days it’s a very partial embargo and the biggest impediment to more trade is Castro.

    I’ve talked to a lot of foreign businessmen in Cuba, including US businessmen, and none have ever had a real problem because of the US embargo.

    All have had problems selling their products to Castro and trouble with his very corrupt bureaucracy.

  13. THE CASTRO OLIGARCHY MAFIA DOES NOT CHANGE IT’S FASCIST SPOTS! SOME “CHANGES” RIGHT? WHERE ARE ALL THE LEFTISTS IN LATIN AMERICA ON THESE HUMAN RIGHTS AND FREEDOM OF SPEECH ISSUE??

    BREIBART NEWS: Cuba Detained Almost 1,000 Dissidents in June, Tortured Political Prisoners – by Frances Martel

    While many in the mainstream media push the narrative that Cuba’s communist government is somehow more “open” than in the past, the Cuban government is exploiting that good will to violently detain and torture political dissidents. According to one NGO, 963 dissidents were arbitrarily arrested in June. The Cuban Commission of Human Rights and National Reconciliation, an NGO dedicated to reporting on the torture and oppression of anti-communist thought in Cuba, revealed in its monthly report that 963 individuals were arrested for political reasons in June. While this number is smaller than record-setting May, when 1,120 Cuban citizens are arrested for political reasons, the alarming rate of detention indicates that the Cuban government has no interest in a more-liberated society.

    Several individual cases of arrests stand out. Serial hunger striker and Sakharov Prize winner Guillermo Fariñas was arrested, according to the group, “almost every Monday of June … to impede scheduled meetings of his organization.” Fariñas has attempted to schedule meetings with dissidents to organize a movement against the government and has used Twitter to chronicle the beatings that he has received as the government attempts to break up those weekly meetings. On this past Monday–the last in June–Fariñas tweeted a photo of what appear to be stab wounds on his arms, from Cuban police:

    CLICK LINK FOR ENTIRE ARTICLE!

    http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Peace/2014/07/02/Cuba-Arbitrarily-Detained-Almost-1-000-Dissidents-in-June-Tortured-Political-Prisoners

  14. NOT CRAZY ABOUT THIS ARTICLE’S TITLE! SHOULD BE “Freedom” NOT “Cash”! BUT GOOD READ!

    YAHOO NEWS: For a few dollars more Brin-Jonathan Butler’s stunning story of a champion boxer confronted with the dilemma: cash or country? – By Prem Panicker

    The story of that first meeting between the author and the boxer is, in miniature, the story of Cuba and of its sportsmen. It is the story of Fidel Castro, whose casual nod sanctifies achievement and whose casual word consigns a champion to oblivion. It is the story of clashing values — the hyper-materialistic world of American boxing versus the country-over-cash ethos made famous by Teofilo Stevenson, who turned down a $10 million offer to fight Mohammed Ali because he preferred the love of his 11 million countrymen.

    Then, athletes from Cuba started leaving on smugglers’ boats. In the blink of an eye, a national hero became a traitor, or a martyr, depending on your point of view. Every boxer’s career became a kind of referendum about the health of Cuban society. At the same time, when these escaping athletes shipwrecked into the American Dream, they offered another referendum on the health of American society from unique and highly unsettling angles.

    Less than two years after that meeting, Rigondeaux defected to the United States, braving the State’s wrath and the volatile, shark-invested waters of the Gulf of Mexico. He left behind his wife and children; he walked blind into the world of professional boxing where one punch could leave him unemployable even in a McDonald’s, and where the dangers outside the boxing ring were deadlier than any he would face within its confines.

    Today, Rigo is undefeated super-bantamweight champion of the world, holding the World Boxing Association, World Boxing Organization, and The Ring magazine titles. And today, his face holds more sadness than it ever did when he ranked among the living dead in Castro’s Cuba.

    A Cuban Boxer’s Journey: Guillermo Rigondeaux, from Castro’s Traitor to American Champion is the story of a lost and lonely boxer and his journey. It is also the story of a lost, lonely and scared little boy who faced down his own cowardice in a gym, and who learnt that the only secret to life is to risk all for what he truly believes in.

    Your point about larger narratives brings me to Cuba. I picked up what I thought was a book about a Cuban boxer. In your introductory chapter you write: “The waves lapping against Cuba’s shore have long felt as much like the bars of a prison cell as a gateway to freedom”. And from there on, your book is as much about Cuba as it is about boxing.

    Is this the story of an athlete framed against the country? Or is the athlete just a peg on which you hang the story of Cuba, a country that breeds “the most valuable human cargo on earth” but also consigns its heroes to oblivion on a whim?

    In Cuba, money isn’t a metric for quality. Fights are free to watch. One seat is as good as another. So everybody is left to search for meaning and quality on other terms. The fighter’s sacrifice to remain in Cuba is a reflection of the common sacrifice for allCubans to remain. Boxing acts as a kind of canary in the coal mine, illuminating as much about the struggle of the fighters as of the people who cheer them on. What are these people fighting for? What do they stand for? What are they trying to protect? What are their values? Those questions, asked about Cuba’s greatest champions, tell such an impossibly fascinating story about their culture and society on the whole, just as American champions tell about theirs.

    In the course of an extended email interview, Brin-Jonathan Butler spoke of those two stories, and of how it all came about. Excerpts:

    CLICK FOR ENTIRE INTERVIEW!

    https://in.news.yahoo.com/for-a-few-dollars-more-053744745.html

  15. When I was young and lived in Cuba I used to hear a lot about the “blockade”. The way the government put it, the blockade was real for me. I saw it as a bunch of US ships hovering just over the horizon, trying to stop the flow of products we hard working Cubans were trying to export.

    So, as life in Fidel´s worker´s paradise became more unbearable, I decided to leave. Being young and innocent, I felt I could swim all the way to one of those yankee imperialist ships I just knew had to be somewhere out there.

    Imagine my disappointment when my dad explained my US fleet was imaginary, because there was no real blockade. He explained what the US had used was called an embargo, the damn yankee imperialists had refused to trade with us…. and there were no ships.

    I had already learned the government was both repressive and stupid. But I hadn´t realized much of what the government said was plain and simple lies. After I escaped, I got educated, and I had the opportunity to discuss Cuba with communists elsewhere. The funny thing is these guys seem to believe the imaginary US fleet is still sitting out there, hovering over the horizon, and waiting to stop all those goods hard working Cubans can produce in such large quantities.

  16. Omar,

    It is a hopeless case to compare the US to the poor latino countries, such as Cuba.
    You mention young Americans turning to drugs and you probably realize thet the War on Drugs is lost. Unfortunately, the cuban government has not realized it yet. There is news today of women arrested in Havana for marihuana. Why?

    Recreational marihuna should be legal. Urugay has recognized it, some US-states are waking up, the Netherlands have long been cashing on the pot tourism. Too bad Cuba is still in the 20th century with their strict drug policy.

    You are right that Cuba delivers better on “good governance, prevention of chaos and minimum inequality” but they still have a long TO DO list.

  17. Omar,

    In your opinion, what percentage of the Cuban military bloggers who post here believe what they are posting?

    Some Cuban friends tell me they have a quota to post every day.

    Is it by the word? By the post? Or both?

    Whether you operate out of Cuba or somewhere else, you are definitely part of “The Rich” in the eyes of most Cubans.

    Why don’t you show the USA how it’s done and share some of your wealth with the poor?

  18. Yoani,

    “Someday when a Cuban body language glossary is prepared, it will include this pose of “falling into the abyss of nothingness.” ….you make a very good observation, because I have noticed the same thing among the 50% of youth in the United States who never get a solid education and have to join the armed forces because they have no choice. In the bastion of democracy and liberty, 50% of our young people have to live on average 5 years in the most oppressive and tyrannical organization in the World: the military organization. They come out with a handful of cash to further their education and broken promises of good careers after service that for most of them never materialize. It is no wonder that so many young Americans commit suicide or end up doing drugs. Capitalism creates the illusion of opportunity, but, it really never has delivered the promises to at least 67% of Americans. It is the biggest lie ever told next to the existence of God. The best a country can do for its people is good governance, prevention of chaos and minimum inequality. A country does not have to be a Rich country to deliver these things. There are countries in the World that excel in doing this. The U.S. is not one of them. Scandinavian countries do a better job. Cuba needs more money coming in. Hopefully in your life time the blockade will be lifted. The American People do not want the blockade against Cuba anymore, but, we are not a country of the People by the People if we were, the blockade against Cuba would have ended a very long time ago. The Business class, Privilege and Rich runs the United States and until this oligarchy see the light, there will be a blockade against the Cuban People that contributes to the “pose of falling into the abyss of nothingness” you have observed among the young people of Cuba.

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