There will be 14yMedio for a very long time, gentlemen of State Security

Journalist Juan Carlos Fernandez and  economist Karina Galvez Chiú. (Source: Facebook)

Journalist Juan Carlos Fernandez and economist Karina Galvez Chiú. (Source: Facebook)

Yoani Sanchez, Havana, 7 October 2014 – Monday afternoon was like any other for Juan Carlos Fernandez. The water stubbornly persisted in not coming out of the pipes, so cup by cup he collected it from the lowest source in his house. The family revolved around his mother-in-law, who had been suffering for half a year, dying, and now and again this lanky and smiling man from Pinar del Rio looked at the phone to see if there were any messages.

The routine was broken when someone knocked on the door and handed him a summons from the police. El Juanca – as his friends call him – is accustomed to State Security calling him to account. His longtime work with Coexistence magazine and his nonconformity as a citizen have taken him, on many occasions, to police cells and stations. So, he didn’t even flinch and notified all those who love him and appreciate him.

This morning he was finally face-to-face with a police official at the Technical Investigation Department (DTI). The topic at hand was as predictable as it was invasive of his rights. His collaboration with our little digital daily newspaper was the reason for the most recent box on the ears they gave him.

“They gave me a written warning for working for an illegal unregistered publication,” Juanca told me. With the mix of playfulness and good humor that characterizes him, he quickly suggested to the lady “that they allow the legalization of 14ymedio.”

Clearly, she responded evasively to his proposal, because fact of not allowing non-governmental media to exist seems to be an indispensable condition to sustain the official press, which is so bad from the journalistic point of view that only its status as a monopoly can ensure that it has an audience.

“You people are not journalists,” the official snapped. To which Juanca shot back, “Differences aside, neither was José Martí.”

Among other falsehoods, the police told him that 14ymedio was a newspaper financed by USAID. Although this accusation is repeated against any independent project, in this case it demonstrates ignorance more than malice. This newspaper, publicly and transparently, has a business structure that can be read in detail in the “About Us” section of its digital page.

This financial arrangement was precisely one of the conditions we found indispensable to undertaken renewed journalism with a sustainable press media. Unlike the government newspaper Granma, and all the official newspapers, we do not dip our hands into the state coffers to produce political propaganda. We are waiting anxiously, it’s true, for them to allow us to register our small enterprise in the corporate records of our country. Will they dare to allow it?

We are waiting anxiously for them to allow us to register our small … Will they dare to allow it?

We want to have legal status, to hang a sign on the door of our editorial offices and display, without fear, our press credentials. Why do they refuse us this right? Haven’t they realized that a press hijacked by a single party doesn’t meet the information demands of a plural and diverse country like ours? Will they ever have the political courage to pass a law so that independent journalism will emerge from the shadows into public life?

When that functionary lies without giving us the right to reply, she is using her authority to commit a true abuse of power. Which becomes even more dramatic because of the level of disinformation within which most Cubans and apparently, the political police as well, exist.

Wrapped in her uniform, the official also told Juanca that our media dedicated itself to “defaming and denigrating the achievements of the Revolution.” With this statement, the lady made it clear that in this country only media that sings the praises of the system can exist; and on the other hand, it gives the impression that she has privileged access to 14ymedio, because since our birth, on 21 May 2014, we have been blocked on the Island’s servers. Madam, do you enter our page via anonymous proxies? Or, even worse, are you talking about something you’ve never seen? I fear it’s the latter.

I also challenge this policewoman to point out to me a single characteristic of the current Cuban political system that allows her to call it a “Revolution.” Where is the dynamism? The character of renewal? The movement? Please, update your words – not out of respect for this renegade philologist who believes in the semantics of the terminology – but because, as long as you don’t publicly acknowledge that you are stuck in a stagnant and fossilized history, you will not be able to implement the solutions this nation urgently needs.

During the interrogation, our Pinar del Rio correspondent was also threatened that, if it looked like he was practicing journalism, he would be arrested and his phone and camera confiscated. Let’s hear it for the ideological bulwark information puts at risk! I understand the truth less and less.

In this situation we have come to, everything is possible. Repression, in the worst style of the 2003 Black Spring; the rifle butts breaking down the doors; the continuation of the campaign of defamation, increasingly ineffectual… this and much more. What will not happen is that, faced with the fear and the pressure, we will cease to do journalism. 14ymedio is going to be around for a long time, so you might as well get used to living with us.

178 thoughts on “There will be 14yMedio for a very long time, gentlemen of State Security

  1. Cuba agricultural sector is in shambles. Cuba’s National Office of Statistics and Information (ONEI), in the report title “Agricultural Sector, Selected Indicators”, include information from January to December of 2013.

    The agricultural production results of 2013 look very bleak with regard to the economic model adopted by the Castroit tyrannical regime. The drop in production mimic what happened 50 years ago. Below is a comparison between 2013 and 2012.

    Food production was 67,200 tons less than in 2012.

    Potato production dropped 4 %

    Production of other tuber crops decreased by 37 %.

    Banana production dropped 25.6 %, for a total of 181,700 tons less.

    Citric fruits dropped 18.8 %, for a total of 34,400 tons less.

    Cow milk production was 12.7 million liters less.

    Milk delivered to the population was 17 million liters less

    Milk delivered to the industry was 7.8 million liters less.

  2. COLOMBIA IMPLICATED IN THE ASSASSINATION OF A VENEZUELAN PARLAMENTARIAN. I don’t understand why Venezuela does not give Colombia an ultimatum and prepare for War. An assassination of a high ranking government official by another country is an act of War and Venezuela should respond militarily.
    Mérida, 16th October 2014 (Venezuelanalysis.com) – All eight men who participated in the murder of pro-government lawmaker Robert Serra have been identified, said Venezuelan president Nicolas Maduro in a press conference last night.

    “This assassination was being prepared for over three months. It was directed by a Colombian whose legal identity we have not yet revealed. A Colombian paramilitary meticulously directed the whole preparation process of the crime. He used a gang directed by another thuggish murderer, Padilla Leyva, alias “Colombia,” Maduro told local and international media.

    The Venezuelan president showed cctv footage of how six men entered Robert Serra’s house on Wednesday 1 October, saying that in five to six minutes both Serra and his assistant Maria Herrera were stabbed to death. Two other men waited outside with getaway vehicles.

    According to Venezuelan authorities the “weak point” in Serra’s protection was his bodyguard Eduwin Camacho Torres, who had allegedly turned against Serra and was the person who let the other members of the gang into the young lawmaker’s Caracas home.

    Two members of the group, including Torres, have been arrested and have confessed their role in the assassination, according to authorities. The names of the other alleged members of the gang were released last night, and officials pledge to find and arrest them.

  3. CHRISTINA SOLIDARITY WORLDWIDE: Cuba: Baptist Pastor Threatened With Criminal Charges – 16/10/2014
    Cuban Baptist pastor and religious freedom activist Reverend Mario Felix Lleonart Barroso has received official notice that he may face criminal charges if he does not break ties with “counter-revolutionary elements” in and outside of Cuba, and if he does not stop giving radio interviews. His wife, Yoaxis Marcheco Suarez, was summoned for an interview with security services on 15 October.

    Reverend Mario Felix Lleonart Barroso, a prominent religious freedom activist and church leader, was officially summoned to the State Security Unit in Camajuani, Villa Clara on 8 October. He was threatened with arrest if he did not appear. At the unit a Lieutenant Colonel read out an Official Warning or “Acta de Advertencia”, a document that can be used as justification for future arrests and criminal charges. Two witnesses, whom the pastor did not recognize, were present and offered testimony of his “counter-revolutionary” links. This is the third time that government agents have unsuccessfully attempted to pressure Reverend Lleonart Barroso into signing an Acta de Advertencia.

    According to Reverend Lleonart Barroso, who leads the Ebenezer Baptist Church in the town of Taguayabon in Villa Clara Province, and who is a member of the Western Baptist Convention, one of the largest registered religious organisations on the island, the Lieutenant Colonel told him verbally that the government was unhappy about the pastor’s recent visit to the eastern part of the country. The official added that if the pastor did not change his behaviour soon, a criminal case would “probably be filed.”

    The purpose of Reverend Lleonart Barroso’s visit was to meet with church leaders who had reported violations of religious freedom. Reverend Lleonart Barroso met with Pastor Yiorvis Denis, the leader of a church in Camaguey which has come under repeated threat of forced closure and confiscation of property. He also met with Pastor Esmir Torreblanca, the leader of a large church in Santiago that was razed by the government in July.

    Reverend Lleonart Barroso told Christian Solidarity Worldwide (CSW), “I intend to continue on with my activities in the defence of religious freedom in Cuba.”

  4. The Vzla govt almost without money, collapse imminent? Not good for the already suffering Vzla people, but probably the only realistic way to get rid of the Chavista regime soon…

  5. Yes Simba, this another aspect of the MO of regimes like the Castrista one: Invent a popular opinion that doesn’t exist. Prosperity and human rights, nobody wants that, no no no!

  6. Yes Simba, hindering truth and freedom is at the very basis of how regimes like the Castrista one operate. Regarding OMario, I would be very happy if WordPress would include who the comments are by in the e-mail alerts, because now it takes some time to open and then delete their posts…

  7. NOT TO BE CONFUSED WITH THE REPUBLICAN PARTY OF THE USA!

    THE INTERNATIONAL REPUBLICAN INSTITUTE (IRI) : Cuban Public Opinion Survey – A total of 463 Cuban adults between the ages of 18 to 60 years were surveyed to cuestionárseles on various topics ranging from economics, democracy, freedoms and use of technology.

    In the sample involved 46% of women and 54% of men between the ages of 18 to 60 years, who expressed his disappointment with the majority of political and economic situation in the nation that already has over half a century of communist rule. The questions on the survey was last conducted last February 2011.

    In the investigation conducted by the International Republican Institute (IRI), 78.2% of respondents would vote for a change of political system a democratic system and political pluralism, freedom of choice, voting and free speech if given the chance.

    Among other data for 60.7% of Cubans surveyed said the biggest problem in Cuba is the low wages and high cost of living, while 77.0% said that the current government can not solve the country’s problems in the coming years.

    Also 90.7% said that if they had the opportunity to vote for a change in the economic system that allows them to create companies, owning property in a free market.

    On the use of technology, 72.6% do not have Internet access compared with 5.0% who said yes to access. While 25.3% said the mobile phone access, but what a great majority, ie 74.7%, said they had no access to cell
    http://www.iri.org/sites/default/files/2011%20April%20Cuba%20Poll%20Final%20Survey%20Slide%20Presentation.pdf

  8. WALL STREET JOURNAL: Venezuela Vulnerable to Oil’s Fall – Fears Among Investors Grow That Caracas Could Default Its Debt – By Sara Schaefer Muñoz And Ezequiel Minaya

    CARACAS—This week’s plummeting world oil prices are throwing into doubt financial stability in Venezuela, which relies on the commodity for most of its income.

    Oil exporters from Russia to Iran are suffering with the lowest crude oil prices since June 2012. But few are as vulnerable as Venezuela, where a free-spending populist government had already been grappling with a recession, widespread shortages, and massive protests earlier this year.

    Analysts expect that the Venezuelan barrel—heavier and more expensive to process than Middle East oil—will have fallen below $80 when officials announce this week’s price on Friday, which would be the lowest since late 2010. Last Friday, Venezuelan officials said their country’s crude had fallen to $82.72, nearly a $10 tumble in a little over a month.

    “We were already in a critical and precarious situation with oil prices at $97,” said Tamara Herrera, chief economist at the Caracas-based research firm, Síntesis Financiera.

    The drop in oil price this week spurred worries among investors over whether Venezuela could default on its external sovereign debt, which totals $35.4 billion, according to government figures. State oil company Petróleos de Venezuela SA, known as PdVSA, carries another $32 billion in debt.

    Yields on Venezuela’s benchmark bonds—a broad measure of the reward investors need to lend to the country—surged to more than 18% on Thursday, a five-year high and the highest of any debtor nation, well above the level for war-torn Ukraine or Argentina, which recently defaulted.

    “There is a clear risk that the authorities will run out of money,” said David Rees, an economist at Capital Economics consultancy in London.

    The decline heaps pressure on President Nicolás Maduro ’s embattled government, prompting ever more politically toxic choices between cutting spending in a recession or restricting imports even more in a country that is already hit by shortages and relies on imports for 75% of all goods and services.

    Venezuela’s foreign reserves fell below $20 billion earlier this month, low compared with both other large Latin American economies and with global oil powers.

    CLICK LINK FOR ENTIRE ARTICLE!

    http://online.wsj.com/articles/venezuela-vulnerable-to-oils-fall-1413540003

  9. You are of course right, N. O. My point was that right now the main direct sphere of Cuban influence is LatAm, which then in turn has an effect on the USA. Most Cubans now living in the US are anti-Castro, but there’s probably also many Cuban intelligence agents there providing info also to other powers. Not long ago Putin visited Cuba, and intelligence cooperation was, quite openly, a theme…

  10. Simba Sez: Quote Omar, “The majority of Cubans do not support creating a Democracy of Money Power, apartheid, racism, exploitation and inequality in the island nation.” How is it that a self-proclaimed citizen of the United States is privy to this information? Was there a study by an international committee that I am unaware of? Was there a fair and impartial non-government controlled vote on a referendum asking about the desires of the Cuban citizenry, or is this some made-up nonsense by Omar as usual? Thank you for any clarification.

  11. Thanks yskjs, I feel better now. And Omar with the same old same old long stuff. How boring, zzzzz.

  12. Ms Sanchez article intent is simply to magnify the interaction between two Cubans. One a public servant and the other a citizen bent on spreading news about failures of the society with the invisible understood message that to resolve the failures we must change the government. This radical message is supported by the regime change law of the United States, but, it has no support by more than half of the Cuban People. The majority of Cubans do not support creating a Democracy of Money Power, apartheid, racism, exploitation and inequality in the island nation. Their vision is more in line with the scheme proposed by ECLAC: A scheme for equality and future development requires a virtuous interaction between institutions and structures. In other words, a Democracy of Wealth Distribution, without creating Rich People, minimizing the economic apartheid, no racism, no exploitation without fair compensation and Environmental stewardship.

  13. Ms Sanchez article intent is simply to magnify the interaction between two Cubans. One a public servant and the other a citizen bent on spreading news about failures of the society with the invisible understood message that to resolve the failures we must change the government. This radical message is supported by the regime change law of the United States, but, it has no support by more than half of the Cuban People. The majority of Cubans do not support creating a Democracy of Money Power, apartheid, racism, exploitation and inequality in the island nation. Their vision is more in line with the scheme proposed by ECLAC: A scheme for equality and future development such as that proposed by ECLAC in the documents cited and herein requires a virtuous interaction between institutions and structures: industrial policies capable of coordinating public and private agents to raise investment and shift sector composition to boost productivity; governance and use of the region’s comparative advantages in natural resources to build a diversified, knowledge-intensive economy with high value added and make the sphere of work more inclusive; regulation and channelling of consumption growth
    to harmonize public service delivery with private consumption, consistently with environmental sustainability; and construction of a sustainable taxation and social welfare system in order to achieve a high redistributive impact and expand capacity-building for society as a whole. Only through a virtuous dialectic between institutional change and structural change will it be possible to boost development in the strategic direction. In other words, a Democracy of Wealth Distribution, without creating Rich People, minimizing the economic apartheid, no racism, no exploitation without fair compensation and Environmental stewardship.

  14. THERE IS A CLEAR DISCONNECT BETWEEN U.S. DEMOCRACY OF MONEY POWER, ECONOMIC APARTHEID, RACISM AND INEQUALITY AND DEMOCRACY OF INCLUSIVENESS BEING BUILT IN LATIN AMERICA AND SOME OF THE CARIBBEAN COUNTRIES. EXCELLENT VISION AND FRAME FOR DRIVING CHANGE TO A MORE INCLUSIVE SOCIETY IS OFFERED BY ECLAC IN THEIR REPORT ON INEQUALITY….THE CHALLENGE IS THE CREATION OF NATIONAL WEALTH WITH HEAVY DEPENDENCY ON WESTERN POWERS DOMINATED FINANCIAL WORLD MARKETS.

  15. HERE IS A CLEAR DISCONNECT BETWEEN U.S. DEMOCRACY OF MONEY POWER, ECONOMIC APARTHEID, RACISM AND INEQUALITY AND DEMOCRACY OF INCLUSIVENESS BEING BUILT IN LATIN AMERICA AND SOME OF THE CARIBBEAN COUNTRIES. EXCELLENT VISION AND FRAME FOR DRIVING CHANGE TO A MORE INCLUSIVE SOCIETY….THE CHALLENGE IS THE CREATION OF NATIONAL WEALTH WITH HEAVY DEPENDENCY ON WESTERN POWERS DOMINATED FINANCIAL WORLD MARKETS.

    A scheme for equality and future development such as that proposed by ECLAC in the documents cited and herein requires a virtuous interaction between institutions and structures: industrial policies capable of coordinating public and private agents to raise investment and shift sector composition to boost productivity; governance and use of the region’s comparative advantages in natural resources to build a diversified, knowledge-intensive economy with high value added and make the sphere of work more inclusive; regulation and channelling of consumption growth
    to harmonize public service delivery with private consumption, consistently with environmental sustainability; and construction of a sustainable taxation and social welfare system in order to achieve a high redistributive impact and expand capacity-building for society as a whole. Only through a virtuous dialectic between institutional change and structural change will it be possible to boost development in the strategic direction

  16. Simba Sez: I can see that good old Cuban Government loving Omar and others are running true to form, and have switched the topic from Yoani’s expose of Government tactics of journalism suppression to everything but that. Day after day, same old stuff, anything but what the blog is about. Carry on.

  17. ECLAC report on inequality:
    only through compacts will society be able to take ownership of the sense and content of such policies. As argued in Time for Equality1 and in Structural Change for Equality,2 a new
    equation between the State, society and the market, as appropriate for each national reality, is needed in which the actors endorse and internalize development strategies through collective accords. This is the only way to restore the sovereignty of our countries in finding their own paths, based on their own history and identity, and to surmount the unfair limitations long imposed by reason of origin, age, gender or ethnicity.
    In short, notwithstanding the past decade of achievements in terms of economic growth, employment and various social indicators, albeit with differences between countries and sub regions, investment rates and productivity remain low, and growth continues to rely heavily on private consumption skewed heavily towards imported goods and is, moreover, highly dependent on natural resources and international commodity prices. All of this generates serious balance-of-payment vulnerabilities, compounded by growing levels of violence and a backlog of unfulfilled
    responsibilities in key areas such as health, social security and education.
    At this juncture of recent advances and the difficulties foreseen in sustaining and building on them in the medium term, ECLAC aims to consolidate the development approach it has been proposing to governments in the region over the past few years. It bases this approach on the values that modern and developed societies hold most dear:
    equality, environmental sustainability, well-being and democracy, from a medium- and long-term perspective, and in light of the hard lessons of history.

  18. ECLAC FOLLOWING THE IMF LEAD:

    (October 13, 2014) The region’s countries should invest annually 6.2% of their Gross Domestic Product (GDP)-some $320 billion dollars-to satisfy their infrastructure demands in the period 2012-2020, according to new estimates released today by the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC).

    That is the conclusion of a United Nations organization’s study, which was prepared by the Infrastructure Services Unit of ECLAC’s Natural Resources and Infrastructure Division.

    In the report, ECLAC unveils the Economic Infrastructure Investment in Latin America and the Caribbean Database 1980-2012 (EII-LAC-DB), which collects and systematizes figures by country and investment origin (public or private) and updates the annual investment requirements in four main economic infrastructure sectors (transportation, energy, telecommunications, and water and sanitation) to respond to the needs that will arise from the region’s companies and end users in that same period.

  19. Canadian Blue Diamond hotel chain announced its intentions to expand its presence in the Cuban market, so it is in talks with companies in the country to expand its management in the main tourist centers of the island.

    This company is the third largest hotel chain presence in Cuba, which already manages four thousand rooms spread in six hotels. It is operating under the Memories brand with cheapest deals essentially directed to the family segment, and Royalton, luxury and only for adults.

    “The intention is to continue growing with new projects in Havana, Jibacoa, Holguin, Varadero and Santa Maria and Coco Keys, looking for settling in the next two years as the second foreign chain that manages more rooms in the Cuban island” he said.

    The Royalton Cayo Santa Maria appeared in 2013 as the best resort in Cuba and the Caribbean, according to the opinions of thousands of users in the global travel site TripAdvisor.

    Supported by the expertise of its sales and entertainment teams, the Canadian company also plans to increase its on-site services currently operating, with the opening of theme parks and water slides, highly sought after today by the family segment.

  20. Canadian Blue Diamond hotel chain announced its intentions to expand its presence in the Cuban market, so it is in talks with companies in the country to expand its management in the main tourist centers of the island.

    This company is the third largest hotel chain presence in Cuba, which already manages four thousand rooms spread in six hotels. It is operating under the Memories brand with cheapest deals essentially directed to the family segment, and Royalton, luxury and only for adults.

    Rafael Villanueva, commercial director of the group said to have helped positioning the island in the main online reputation sites like TripAdvisor, Holiday Check and Monark has allowed cuban companies trust the management model of Blue Diamond to manage and promotion their hotels worldwide.

    “The intention is to continue growing with new projects in Havana, Jibacoa, Holguin, Varadero and Santa Maria and Coco Keys, looking for settling in the next two years as the second foreign chain that manages more rooms in the Cuban island” he said.

    The Royalton Cayo Santa Maria appeared in 2013 as the best resort in Cuba and the Caribbean, according to the opinions of thousands of users in the global travel site TripAdvisor.

    Supported by the expertise of its sales and entertainment teams, the Canadian company also plans to increase its on-site services currently operating, with the opening of theme parks and water slides, highly sought after today by the family segment.

  21. From April 2015 the airline Edelweiss of Switzerland will begin to operate direct flights to Havana to have two flights per week. Edelweiss is leading tours in that European country.

    The Ministry of Tourism of Cuba reported that the decision of the company associated with Swiss International Air Lines, is part of a series of amendments made by the company in its infrastructure and travel itineraries.

  22. @yskjs

    Yes, I am aware of Castro’s foibles in Angola and dozens of other countries.

    Castro’s terrorist attacks in the USA are just a tiny fraction of the mayhem and death this maximum fool has caused.

    My point is there have been hundreds of terrorist attacks on the USA, funded and organized by Castro, protection and nice pension for terrorists provided by Castro in Cuba.

    And Castro’s sycophants in the USA want Castro off the terrorist list.

    I could understand their stupidity if Castro wasn’t responsible for the death of innocent Americans, but he is, and he never apologized for it.

    Instead of accepting responsibility, all he can come up with are fantasies of non-existent US plots and attacks against Cuba.

    I mean, seriously. Castro blows up US civilians in NYC.

    Castro blows up civilian US aircraft over international waters.

    And the US is criticized for trying to connect a few elderly Cubans to the internet.

    The level of hostility seems mighty out of balance from where I sit.

  23. Don’t feel bad, sandokan, the ones who made the really big mistake were the Castros who reduced coffee production by more than 90%. With all the growth in the world in the last half century there have been more than enough customers, but no…

  24. So in this respect CastroChavismo is doing exactly the same thing in both countries: The complete destruction of any significant production of anything is necessary in order to prevent people from making money, which leads to them having power. Only Pol Pot did it better!

  25. I read somewhere that the politicos in the USA don’t want Cuba to collapse. That’s understandable, with all the other disasters the USA already is not handling very well. However with the very puny little reforms of RC, the probability of a collapse is very high indeed…

  26. I made a mistake in the previous post, the coffee production in 2012 was 4,000 tons, not 40 tons. Sorry.

  27. On December 12, 2013, the regime-run weekly Trabajadores reported that “coffee production has fallen by 90 percent in recent years. Cuba once produced 60,000 tons of coffee per year, but now it scarcely reaches 10 percent of that quantity,” Trabajadores said, citing figures compiled by the Agriculture Ministry.

    Cuba coffee harvest in 1956 reached 60,000 tons and was capable of exporting 20,000 tons valued at $20 million. In 2012, coffee production reached only 40 tons. Coffee production has suffered a huge reduction of 93.3% in comparison with 1956, and imports of coffee amounted to $50 million. Coffee production per capita in 1956 with a population of 6.3 million was 21 pounds, and in 2012 with a population of 11.2 million of only 0.79 lbs. Another of the great catastrophes of the Castroit regime.

  28. THE “TIMBIRICHE ECONOMY” OF Raul Castro WONT EVEN SCRATCH THE SURFACE IN HELPING THE CUBAN ECONOMY TRANSITION INTO THE 21st CENTURY! THE REAL HELP WILL COME FROM THE CUBAN COMMUNITY IN THE DIASPORA WHEN THEY SEE THERE IS A REAL CHANCE OF CHANGE AND NOT ANOTHER SMOKE AND MIRROR SHOW BY THE CASTRO OLIGARCHY MAFIA!

    BLOOMBERG: How Business Can Change Cuba – By Tim Padgett

    Although Raúl is no democrat, he’s opened the door—just a crack, but wide enough to exploit. Four years ago he broadened the list of permissible private enterprises, which once consisted of little more than living-room restaurants known as paladares, to include licensing more substantive businessess such as furniture making and bookkeeping. Last year he said Cubans could travel freely abroad—on flights instead of rafts. Earlier this year he approved tax breaks to attract more foreign investment. And he’s letting the Roman Catholic Church run business classes and even offer MBA degrees.

    But perhaps the most important move could happen this fall: scrapping Cuba’s dual currency system, the combo of a near-worthless peso for ordinary Cubans and the “convertible” peso, pegged to the U.S. dollar and used mainly for the tourism transactions that keep the economy afloat. The scheme was created in the 1990s, when Cuba lost the Soviet Union’s largesse. But it’s produced fiscal chaos.

    CLICK LINK FOR ENTIRE ARTICLE!

    http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-10-16/how-business-can-change-cuba

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