Mexico is running out of tears

Mobilization in Mexico City for 43 missing. (Twitter Juan Manuel Karg)

Mobilization in Mexico City for 43 missing. (Twitter Juan Manuel Karg)

YOANI SÁNCHEZ, Havana, 24 November 2014 — When I visited Mexico for the first time I was impressed by its tremendous potential and enormous problems. I was amazed by a culture whose calendar is lost in time, especially when compared to a Cuba that is still a teenager. However, most shocking for me were all the warnings and advice from friends and acquaintances about the insecurity and the dangers that might await one in every street.

The most heartbreaking testimony of that visit, which I heard from the mouth of Judith Torrea, a Spanish journalist based in Ciudad Juárez who collected the stories of mothers whose teenage children never returned to their jobs or their schools.

It pained me to see how violent death has become commonplace in different areas of this beautiful country. La Catrina – Mexico’s grande dame of death – was no longer smiling, rather her empty sockets seemed a sad premonition of what is needed to live in Mexico. The disappearance of the 43 students from Ayotsinapa has exceeded the horror already suffered by a society where corruption, an ineffective legal system, and the armed force of narco-traffickers have thrived for a long time. As if a people already torn apart by what they have lost could suffer new wounds.

Each one of these disappeared young people is around the age of my son Teo, some of their photos remind me of his swarthy face and slanted eyes. He could have been one of those who one day left school and decided to protest against the status quo. All indications are that the local political power, mixed in with the drug cartels, violently ended the lives of those who still had the better part of their existence ahead of them. Over the last few weeks their families have gone from tears to hope and back to pain. The sad end is not confirmed and no one wants to accept it as fact, but the evidence suggests the worst case scenario.

Mexico is running out of tears. It is the responsibility of Latin America to accompany this beloved nation in the search for answers to the disappearance of the students, but also to the solutions of the grave social and institutional problems that caused it. To the citizens, for our part, we offer our solidarity, and we share their pain and their anger. Let no one look their child in the eyes without remembering those who are missing.

180 thoughts on “Mexico is running out of tears

  1. My Dear Humbeto,

    I will send you the ZIP file with the Gross evidence 15 minutes after you will publish the trial transcripts of the prisoners held in Guantanamo.

    It will be 10 minutes if you additionally explain, why the Yemeni ambassador can’t see Khasraf, Mohamed Nasser Yahya Abdullah.

    Ah, they are held without trial? Sorry, I forgot that. Well, it seems we need to send the Pentagon brass to study Constitutional Law in Cuba.

  2. YOUTUBE: Ros-Lehtinen: It Is Unjust That Maduro Regime Uses The Judiciary To Attack Maria Corina Machado

  3. CARACAS CHRONICLES: The A-to-Z of Violating María Corina Machado’s Rights – by Francisco Toro

    Chavismo’s animus against Maria Corina Machado, the leading democracy activist who was indicted on trumped-up charges of “conspiracy” today, has reached farcical extremes. Today, attention was focused on whether she would be jailed – she won’t be quite yet. Nonetheless, the torrent of abuse she’s faced these last few years is extraordinary.

    Consider. Since 2010, María Corina Machado has been accused of ordering buses burned. Of instigating lawlessness. Of seeking to generate chaos and panic. Of infiltrating provocateurs into queues for scarce basic goods. Of palling around with Lorent Saleh. Ofkilling six guards. Of killing Robert Serra. Of plotting to kill the president, (on the basis of forged evidence). Of paying a hacker to delete the evidence against her. Of “plotting a silent coup.” Of “seeking a civil war.” Of conspiracy. Of murder. Of terrorism. Of treason.

    She’s been called an “enemy of the people.” A “shake-down artist of the empire.” A “whore of the empire“. A “hydra-headed monster of coup-plotting“. An “imbecile sell-out lackey.” “Evil for the people.” “The worst the homeland has borne.” “The face of fascism.”

    She’s been threatened with detention at INOF, the notoriously violent women’s prison in Los Teques. She’s been told a jail cell is ready for her.

    She’s been banned from leaving the country. Stripped of her parliamentary immunity. Stripped of her seat in parliament. Denied any forum to defend herself or present evidence to challenge this decision.

    She’s been openly spied on. She’s had her private emails read out on state TV. Her phone calls tapped and the recordings played on state TV. She’s been spied on inside a private home (not on the phone) and had recordings of her conversations broadcast on state TV.

    She’s been assaulted in Caricuao. Detained in Maiquetía. Shoved in Chacao. Attacked in Puerto Ordaz. Assaulted in Turmero.

    CLICK LINK TO ENTIRE ARTICLE FULL OR REFERENCES AND EVIDENCE!
    http://caracaschronicles.com/2014/12/03/the-a-z-of-violations-of-maria-corina-machados-rights/

  4. DEAR Mario! CAN YOU PROVIDE A LINK TO THE TRANSCRIPT TO THE ALAN GROSS TRIAL AND SUBSEQUENT APPEALS DEAR? I CANT SEEM TO FIND IT! NEITHER CAN I FIND A LINK TO PHOTOS OF THE “EVIDENCE” EITHER! AND WHY DO YOU THINK THAT THE PRESS WAS NOT ALLOWED IN THE COURTROOM NOR HAS BEEN ALLOWED TO BE INTERVIEWED ALAN GROSS IN ALL THESE 5 YEARS ? HMMM! IF THE TRIAL WAS SUCH A SLAM DUNK, WHY SUCH SECRECY BY THE CASTRO OLIGARCHY MAFIA? THIS IS WHAT HAPPENS AT A KANGAROO TRIAL!

    NPR : In Cuba, Jailed American Alan Gross Faces Trial
    BLOCK: Now, foreign journalists, I understand, are not allowed into the courtroom to cover the trial. You were outside the courthouse today. What were you able to learn there?
    MIROFF: That’s right. He’s being tried in a small municipal courthouse far away from the city center.
    http://www.npr.org/2011/03/04/134272743/In-Cuba-Jailed-American-Faces-Trial

    NBC NEWS: American jailed in Cuba wants US to sign ‘non-belligerency pact’ to speed release – By Michael Isikoff
    Kornbluh, who has advocated closer U.S.-Cuba dialogue, was in Havana last week to attend a conference marking the 50th anniversary of the Cuban missile crisis. He was granted permission to visit Gross by Cuban officials. (The Cubans so far have denied all news media requests to meet with him.) He said Gross was most upset about being unable to return home to see members of his family who are ill, especially his 90-year-old mother in Texas who has cancer.

    http://openchannel.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/12/02/15620342-american-jailed-in-cuba-wants-us-to-sign-non-belligerency-pact-to-speed-release?lite

  5. Leon Ichaso’s daughter Mari Rodriguez Ichaso made a documentary about the Tugboat Massacre titled “Niños del Paraíso” (Children of Paradise). The YOUTUBE clip has sub-titles

    What would take the “Progressives” to recognize the atrocity perpetuated by the Castros’ regime?

  6. Humberto wants the convicted criminal Alan Gross to be released after 1/3 of his sentence.
    Humberto may be giving something for nothing away. Cuban government does not.

    But in the unlikely case that Raul makes the mistake and approves the release I am already preparing a banner to march in front of cuban embassy:

    RAUL, YOU HAVE JUST BETRAYED THREE DEDICATED CITIZENS.

  7. SO THE N.Y. TIMES MAKES A BLATANT ERROR ON THIS PIECE ABOUT THE HOSTAGE IN CUBA Alan Gross! THEY STATE THAT THE CUBAN “GOVERNMENT” CHARGED HIM WITH ESPIONAGE WHICH THEY DID NOT, HE WAS CHARGED WITH “crimes against the state” A BROAD BRUSH STROKE! THIS IS JOURNALISM??

    N.Y. TIMES: U.S. Calls on Cuba to Free American Held Since 2009 as Spy – By RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD

    MEXICO CITY — After five years of behind-the-scenes talks, entreaties from high-profile emissaries and statements from two governments, each blaming the other for intransigence, it still comes down to this: Alan P. Gross, an American government contractor, remains imprisoned in Cuba on espionage charges.

    The Castro government has repeatedly linked his case to five Cubans serving long prison sentences in the United States on espionage convictions (two of them have been released after serving their terms). But the American government has said Mr. Gross was not a spy and has rejected, so far, a prisoner swap.

    Mr. Gross’s advocates had hoped he would be released as his health deteriorated and as President Obama has expressed interest in improving relations with Cuba; in 2009 he took steps that allowed for more cultural and educational exchanges.

    CLICK LINK FOR ENTIRE ARTICLE!

    http://mobile.nytimes.com/2014/12/04/world/americas/us-calls-on-cuba-to-free-american-held-since-2009-as-spy.html?referrer=&_r=0

  8. Added to 1/3 served, bill Gross’ health and age are heavy arguments, but maybe the Castristas want something in exchange for his freedom?

  9. Bill Gross, that names seems symbolic of the gross mistreatment by the Castristas of the Cuban people and anyone else they can get their hands on…

  10. WUSA: Alan Gross from Md. marks fifth year in Cuban prison

    On Wednesday, Congressman John Delaney of Maryland released the following statement: “Alan Gross’s imprisonment is unjust, unfair and indecent. Every hour that he is behind bars is a violation of justice, five years is unimaginable. The Cuban government should do the right thing and release Alan immediately. It is vitally important that we remember all Americans being held in captivity and work for their release. Alan’s wrongful incarceration is another front in our nation’s long-standing commitment to fight for religious freedom and liberty and I urge our leaders to continue to do everything they can to bring Alan home to his family.”

    Congressman Chris Van Hollen issued the following statement: “Five years ago today, Alan Gross was arrested in Cuba for trying to help the country’s small Jewish community establish an Intranet and improve its access to the Internet on behalf of USAID. And for five years, Alan and his family have paid an enormous personal price. We are doing everything we can to fight to secure his release. I’ve personally urged President Obama to make Alan’s release from Cuban prison a top priority. I also raised the issue directly with Cuban President Castro when I visited Alan last year. Every day that he sits in prison in Havana is another day of injustice for Alan Gross and another day that Cuba is missing an important opportunity to begin to reshape its relations with the United States.”

    Senator Barbara Mikulski of Maryland released this statement: “I have a message for Mr. Castro down in Cuba, let Alan Gross go! Let him go today, let him go now. For five years, he and his family have suffered. The Cuban government has ignored basic human rights and has shown they are not serious about building a relationship with the United States. Every day I think of and pray for the Gross family. I pray that they are reunited soon. If Cuba wants to improve relations with the United States, they need to release Mr. Gross now.”

    http://www.wusa9.com/…/alan-gross-contractor-from…/19822409/

  11. OUR DEAR Omara Fundora CANT BLOCK THE VENEZUELAN COLLAPSE WITH HIS POSTS, MOST MADE OF SELECTIVE TEXTS AND WITHOUT LINKS! AS VENECUBA OR CUBAZUELA GOES SO WILL THE CASTRO OLIGARCHY MAFIA!

    FINANCIAL TIMES VIDEO : Venezuelans’ fears grow amid falling oil prices – by Andres Schipani

    Lines of frustrated shoppers have replaced socialist rallies and posters of Hugo Chávez as among the most ubiquitous images of the South American nation. Analysts believe the situation will worsen after Opec last week resisted Venezuela’s campaign for a cut in output to boost the price of oil, which accounts for 96 per cent of Venezuelan export revenues.

    The Opec member loses about $700m for every dollar drop in the oil price – the 30 per cent drop in crude prices since the summer means total imports will plunge this year to about $43bn compared with $77bn two years ago, estimates Ecoanalítica, a local consultancy. That will exacerbate shortages in an economy already ravaged by inflation, and which is forecast to shrink 3 per cent this year.

    “The fall in the oil price came at the worst moment in the history of Chavismo,” says Luis Vicente León, a respected analyst in Caracas, referring to the governing ideology put in place by Chávez, the former leader who died last year.

    I take it as an opportunity to end superfluous luxuries and unnecessary spending,” he added as he ordered a reduction in government spending and in his own pay – although not, he stressed, in social programmes.

    Cutting those would further erode Mr Maduro’s support base ahead of congressional elections next year, analysts say. The president’s approval rating is at 25 per cent, down from 55 per cent more than a year ago.

    CLICK LINK FOR ENTIRE TEXT AND VIDEO!

    http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/aaa13660-795e-11e4-a57d-00144feabdc0.html

  12. I HEARD ON CUBAN AMERICAN JOURNALIST Maria Elvira Zalazar THAT ACCORDING TO CUBAN LAW, IF YOU HAVE SERVED 1/3 OF YOUR SENTENCE YOU COULD REQUEST EARLY RELEASE! ALAN GROSS WAS SENTENCED TO 15 YEARS AND HE HAS SERVED 5 SO FAR! COULD THIS BE AN EXCUSE TO SAVE FACE FOR THE CASTRO OLIGARCHY MAFIA TO RELEASE HIM? I HOPE SO! USAID HAS ALREADY ADJUSTED ITS COVERT PROGRAM, SO THE CASTRO GOT SOMETHING OUT OF THIS MESS!

  13. DEUTSCHE WELLE GERMAN NEWS: Cuban doctors fight Ebola in Western Africa ‘voluntarily’
    “Cuba is doing this first and foremost to polish its political image, secondly for economic reasons, and thirdly, so that countries that have received their help will vote in Cuba’s favor in international forums like the United Nations,” Guedes told DW.
    The government in Havana earns more than six billion euros a year ($7.6 billion) through these doctors, because only a fraction of what the doctors cost these foreign nations are paid out in their salaries.
    Brazil pays Havana 3,100 euros per doctor per month. Only because of pressure from Brazil’s government do these doctors now get at least 900 euros per month. According to WHO representative Di Fabio, the Cuban government receives a daily flat rate of 190 euros per helper.
    The Cuban Embassy in Berlin did not respond to DW’s request for information as to the salaries of doctors in Ebola-affected regions.
    To learn the proper handling and use of equipment, Cuban medical personnel must complete and three week course at the ‘Pedro Kouri’ Institute of Tropical Medicine. However, should they become infected, said institute director Jorge Pérez, they will be treated in a special ward for international aid workers until they are healed or die from the disease.
    By comparison, volunteers from “Doctors Without Borders” who become infected with Ebola are immediately transferred to their home country and treated there, so they can be as close as possible to their families.

    http://www.dw.de/cuban-doctors-fight-ebola-in-western-africa-voluntarily/a-18021288

  14. The Mandela reconciliation process in South Africa wasn’t a free lunch for the apartheid regime thugs. They had to confess. The alternative to this in Cuba or anyehere else could be civil war…

  15. How many more boats like the “13 de Marzo” tugboat, and the riverboat “XX Aniversario” the Castroit military regime has sank in the last 55 years, sending to their death many innocent children, men and women? How many massacres like the Cuban-Chinese aboard the yacht “Pretexto”? Like the icebergs, where only ten per cent of the mass is visible above the water surface, the rest below the surface isn’t. The same happens with these mass murders of innocent people, where only ten per cent is of common knowledge, the rest below the surface isn’t known up to now.

    One thing that is unavoidable is change, and when it happens will not be possible to forgive and pardon. It is absolutely necessary to judge and condemn the crimes perpetrated by the high-ranking officials of Castroit tyrannical regime. ¡Justice most be done!

  16. Anniversary of a Castroite Massacre
    http://townhall.com/columnists/HumbertoFontova/2010/07/14/anniversary_of_a_castroite_massacre/page/full

    Humberto Fontova

    In the predawn darkness of July 13, 1994, 72 desperate Cubans – old and young, male and female – sneaked aboard a decrepit but seaworthy tugboat in Havana harbor and set off for the U.S. and the prospect of freedom. Let Jack Nicholson label their captive homeland “a paradise!” Let Bonnie Raitt rasp out her ditty calling it a “Happy Little Island!” Let Ted Turner hail their slavemaster as a “Helluva guy!” Let Democratic party honcho Frank Mankiewics proclaim Castro “one of the most charming men I’ve ever met!” Let Michael Moore hail the glories of Cuba’s healthcare in Sicko. Let Barbara Walters add gravitas while soft-soaping Castro during an “interview”: “you have brought great health to your country.”

    The people boarding that tug knew better. And for a simple reason: the cruel hand of fate had slated them to live under Fidel Castro and Che Guevara’s handiwork.

    The lumbering craft cleared the harbor and five foot waves started buffeting the tug. The men sprung to action as the impromptu crew while mothers, sisters and aunts hushed the terrified children, some as young as one. Turning back was out of the question.

    A few miles into the turbulent sea, 30-year-old Maria Garcia felt someone tugging her sleeve. She looked down and it was her 10-year-old son, Juan. “Mami, look!” and he pointed behind them toward shore. “What’s those lights?”

    “Looks like a boat following us, son,” she stuttered while stroking his hair. “Calm down, mi hijo (my son). Try to sleep. When you wake up, we’ll be with our cousins in a free country. Don’t worry.” In fact, Maria suspected the lights belonged to Castro patrol boats coming out to intercept them.

    In seconds the patrol boats were alongside the tug and – WHACK!! – with its steel prow, the closest patrol boat rammed the back of the tug. People were knocked around the deck like bowling pins. But it looked like an accident, right? Rough seas and all. Could happen to anyone, right?

    Hey, WATCHIT IT!” a man yelled as he rubbed the lump on his forehead. “We have women and children aboard!” Women held up their squalling children to get the point across. If they’d only known.
    This gave the gallant Castroites nice targets for their water cannon. WHOOSH! The water cannon was zeroed and the trigger yanked. The water blast shot into the tug, swept the deck and mowed the escapees down, slamming some against bulkheads, blowing others off the deck into the five-foot waves.

    “MI HIJO! MI HIJO!” Maria screamed as the water jet slammed into her, ripping half the clothes off her body and ripping Juan’s arm from her grasp. “JUANITO! JUANITO!” She fumbled frantically around her, still blinded by the water blast. Juan had gone spinning across the deck and now clung desperately to the tug’s railing 10 feet behind Maria as huge waves lapped his legs.

    WHACK! Another of the steel patrol boats turned sharply and rammed the tug from the other side. Then – CRACK! another from the front! WHACK! The one from behind slammed them again. The tug was surrounded. It was obvious now: The ramming was NO accident. And in Cuba you don’t do something like this without strict orders from WAY above.

    “We have women and children aboard!” The men yelled. “We’ll turn around! OK?!”

    WHACK! the Castroites answered the plea by ramming them again. And this time the blow from the steel prow was followed by a sharp snapping sound from the wooden tug. In seconds the tug started coming apart and sinking. Muffled yells and cries came from below. Turns out the women and children who had scrambled into the hold for safety after the first whack had in fact scrambled into a watery tomb.

    With the boat coming apart and the water rushing in around them, some got death grips on their children and managed to scramble or swim out. But not all. The roar from the water cannons and the din from the boat engines muffled most of the screams, but all around people were screaming, coughing, gagging and sinking.

    Fortunately, a Greek freighter bound for Havana had happened upon the scene of slaughter and sped to the rescue. NOW one of the Castro boats threw out some life preservers on ropes and started hauling people in, pretending they’d been doing it all along.

    Maria Garcia lost her son, Juanito, her husband, brother, sister, two uncles and three cousins in the maritime massacre. In all, 43 people drowned, 11 of them children. Carlos Anaya was 3 when he drowned, Yisel Alvarez 4. Helen Martinez was 6 months old.

    And all this death and horror to flee from a nation that experienced net immigration throughout the 20th Century, where boats and planes brought in many more people than they took out – except on vacation. (Despite what you saw in The Godfather, actually, in 1950, more Cubans vacationed in the U.S. than Americans in Cuba, as befit a nation with a bigger middle class than Switzerland.)

    Thirty one people were finally plucked from the seas and hauled back to Cuba where all were jailed or put under house arrest. They hadn’t been through enough, you see. But a few later escaped Cuba on rafts and reached Miami. Hence we have Maria Garcia’s gut-wrenching testimony presented to the UN, the OAS and Amnesty International, who all filed “complaints,” reports, “protests.”(with the customary results.)

    This was obviously a rogue operation by crazed deviants, you say. No government could possibly condone, much less directly order such a thing! Right?

    Wrong. Nothing is random in Stalinist Cuba. One of the gallant water-cannon gunners was even decorated (personally) by Castro. Perhaps for expert marksmanship. A three-year old child presents a pretty small target. A six-month old baby an even smaller one. “Magnificent job defending the glorious revolution, compañero!”

  17. Bill Gross was deceived by the Castristas. So many of us have been somewhat naive, trusting that the authorities wherever in the world would keep their word and stick to their own rules. Now more and more people are waking up…

  18. CUBA’S INTERNATIONALISM
    it’s not the first time that Cuba has provided the lion’s share of medical relief following a humanitarian disaster. Four years ago, after the devastating earthquake in impoverished Haiti, Cuba sent the largest medical contingent and cared for 40% of the victims. In the aftermath of the Kashmir earthquake of 2005, Cuba sent 2,400 medical workers to Pakistan and treated more than 70% of those affected; they also left behind 32 field hospitals and donated a thousand medical scholarships.

    That tradition of emergency relief goes back to the first years of the Cuban revolution. But it is only one part of an extraordinary and mushrooming global medical internationalism. There are now 50,000 Cuban doctors and nurses working in 60 developing countries. As Canadian professor John Kirk puts it: “Cuban medical internationalism has saved millions of lives.” But this unparalleled solidarity has barely registered in the western media.

    Cuban doctors have carried out 3m free eye operations in 33 countries, mostly in Latin America and the Caribbean, and largely funded by revolutionary Venezuela. That’s how Mario Teran, the Bolivian sergeant who killed Che Guevara on CIA orders in 1967, had his sight restored 40 years later by Cuban doctors in an operation paid for by Venezuela in the radical Bolivia of Evo Morales. While emergency support has often been funded by Cuba itself, the country’s global medical services are usually paid for by recipient governments and have now become by far Cuba’s largest export, linking revolutionary ideals with economic development. That has depended in turn on the central role of public health and education in Cuba, as Havana has built a low-cost biotech industry along with medical infrastructure and literacy programmes in the developing countries it serves – rather than sucking out doctors and nurses on the western model.

    Internationalism was built into Cuba’s DNA. As Guevara’s daughter, Aleida, herself a doctor who served in Africa, says: “We are Afro-Latin Americans and we’ll take our solidarity to the children of that continent.” But what began as an attempt to spread the Cuban revolution in the 60s and became the decisive military intervention in support of Angola against apartheid in the 80s, has now morphed into the world’s most ambitious medical solidarity project.

    Its success has depended on the progressive tide that has swept Latin America over the past decade, inspired by socialist Cuba’s example during the years of rightwing military dictatorships. Leftwing and centre-left governments continue to be elected and re-elected across the region, allowing Cuba to reinvent itself as a beacon of international humanitarianism.

    But the island is still suffocated by the US trade embargo that has kept it in an economic and political vice for more than half a century. If Barack Obama wants to do something worthwhile in his final years as president he could use Cuba’s role in the Ebola crisis as an opening to start to lift that blockade and wind down the US destabilisation war.

    There are certainly straws in the wind. In what looked like an outriding operation for the administration, the New York Times published six editorials over five weeks in October and November praising Cuba’s global medical record, demanding an end to the embargo, attacking US efforts to induce Cuban doctors to defect, and calling for a negotiated exchange of prisoners.

    The paper’s campaign ran as the UN general assembly voted for the 23rd time, by 188 votes to 2 (US and Israel), to demand the lifting of the US blockade, originally imposed in retaliation for the nationalisation of American businesses and now justified on human rights grounds – by a state allied to some of the most repressive regimes in the world.

  19. REDUCTION IN POVERTY MODEL….CUBA COULD INTEGRATE INTO ECONOMIC PLAN AFTER MONETARY UNIFICATION TAKES PLACE.

    Common characteristics of high sustained growth

    1. INNOVATION Openness Import knowledge Exploit global demand

    2. STABILIZATION Macroeconomic stability Modest inflation. Sustainable public finances

    3. ACCUMULATION Future orientation .High investment. High saving

    4. ALLOCATION Market allocation .Prices guide resources.Resources follow prices

    5. INCLUSION Leadership and governance.Credible commitment to growth. Credible commitment
    to inclusion. Capable administration

  20. THINGS GETTING UGLY FOR VENEZUELA…BUT, NOT BROKE YET……
    Maduro orders budget cuts amid oil-price plunge

    President Nicolas Maduro has ordered budget cuts in response to a sharp drop in oil prices, calling for salary reductions for himself and other senior government officials. He said in a speech that he was naming a special presidential commission to identify areas of superfluous public spending. The budget was prudently calculated based on an oil price of US$ 60 a barrel with the idea that excess petroleum-export earnings would be used to fund government-subsidized social programs, but the steep decline in Venezuela’s crude basket has made spending cuts necessary, Maduro said. (Latin American Herald Tribune, http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=2363062&CategoryId=10717)

  21. MORE POLITICAL WITCH HUNTING BY THE CHAVISTASFASCISTAS WITH THE HELP OF THEIR LORDS,THE CASTRO OLIGARCHY MAFIA! BUT THE WHOLE WORLD IS WATCHING!

    REUTERS: Venezuela indicts opposition leader Machado, alleging plot to kill Maduro – BY BRIAN ELLSWORTH

    Machado, who was at the forefront of major street protests against Maduro’s socialist government earlier this year, has dismissed the accusations as a charade meant to silence her and distract Venezuelans from a growing economic crisis.

    If found guilty, the former legislator could be sentenced to between 8 and 16 years in jail.

    “Our only option is to fight for democracy and freedom,” Machado said after she was indicted at the state prosecutor’s office in Caracas on Wednesday.

    “We’re at the doors of a transition period,” she said, , draped in a yellow, blue, and red Venezuelan flag as dozens of supporters chanted their support.

    One of Machado’s advisors said authorities had not ordered her immediate detention. There were no immediate indications the case could spark the same type of street demonstrations that rocked Venezuela for three months earlier this year.

    Fellow opposition leader Leopoldo Lopez, who with Machado kickstarted the anti-government protests, has been behind bars since February in what government critics blast as a crackdown on political foes.

    CLICK LINK FOR ENTIRE ARTICLE!
    http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/12/03/us-venezuela-politics-idUSKCN0JH1Z920141203

  22. Oil at $40 possible as market redraws politics from Caracas to Tehran

    Oil’s decline is proving to be the worst since the collapse of the financial system in 2008 and threatening to have the same global impact of falling prices three decades ago that led to the Mexican debt crisis and the end of the Soviet Union. Russia, the world’s largest producer, can no longer rely on the same oil revenues to rescue an economy suffering from European and U.S. sanctions. Iran, also reeling from similar sanctions, will need to reduce subsidies that have partly insulated its growing population. Nigeria, fighting an Islamic insurgency, and Venezuela, crippled by failing political and economic policies, also rank among the biggest losers from the decision by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries last week to let the force of the market determine what some experts say will be the first free-fall in decades. (Bloomberg, http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-11-30/oil-at-40-possible-as-market-transforms-caracas-to-iran.html)

  23. ALAN GROSS IS NOT A SPY! HIS KANGAROO TRIAL WAS HELD IN SECRECY BY THE CASTRO OLIGARCHY MAFIA! NO TRANSCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR TRIAL OR APPEALS! NOT EVEN PHOTOS OF THE EVIDENCE! THAT SHOULD TELL YOU EVERYTHING ABOUT THE CASTRO JUSTICE SYSTEM!! AND DEAR Mario SEEMS TO BE BACK SINGING HIS FAVORITE “BAD OLD USA” WHEN HE LACKS INTELLIGENT RESPONSES! POBRECITO!

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE PRESS STATEMENT: Five-Year Mark of the Continued Incarceration of Alan Gross – Marie Harf – Deputy Department Spokesperson, Office of the Spokesperson – Washington, DC – December 2, 2014
    Tomorrow, development worker Alan Gross will begin a sixth year of unjustified imprisonment in difficult conditions in Cuba. Cuban authorities arrested Mr. Gross on December 3, 2009, and later sentenced him to 15 years in prison for facilitating uncensored internet contact between a small, religious community on the island and the rest of the world. It is gravely disappointing, especially in light of its professed goal of providing Cubans with internet access, that the Cuban government has not allowed Mr. Gross to return to his family, where he belongs. We reiterate our call on the Cuban government, echoing foreign leaders and even Cuba’s allies, to release Alan Gross immediately.
    http://www.state.gov/r/pa/prs/ps/2014/12/234619.htm

  24. Another interesting story from Humberto.

    I wish they had Actos de Repudio in Ferguson rather then police bullets.

    Actos de repudio – rejection of anti-social elements by the citizens – is the most civilised way of dealing with social pathology.

    Do you guys realize that after 9/11 more unarmed US citizens died from the hands (well, bullets) of police then from terrorist attacks?

    And, yes, the numbers include those who died in the World Trade Center.

    PRESIDENT RAUL – TEACH US ACTOS DE REPUDIO PLEASE!

  25. YOUTUBE: CUBAN DOCUMENTARY “GUSANO” (with English Sub-Titles)

    The documentary directed by Aller Gonzalez and Antonio Rodiles, which proved an exception to this rule, deals with Cuba’s actos de repudio (“acts of retaliation”), highlighting the government action of December 10, 2013, taken against the home of activist Antonio Rodiles, which served as the venue of the International Human Rights Day event held that day. The film tells the sad story of these practices which became part of the domestic policy of the revolutionary government following the events at the Peruvian embassy in Havana in 1980.

    Cuban poet Rafael Alcides, bloggers Regina Coyula, Luzbely Escobar and Rebeca Monzo, former military officer Fernando Damaso and others offer an overview of these practices and their intimidating intent, aimed more at those who perpetrate them than those who become their victims. Through these acts of violence, the government clearly shows common citizens what they can expect if they join the opposition.

    “Let ‘em have it, they’re not that many,” the rabble yells in front of the meeting place of the Ladies in White, located on Neptuno street. Blogger Luzbely Escobar filmed the incident and claims to have felt nauseous after seeing such brutality.

    The documentary has been very well received in Venezuela, where the Internet can still be freely accessed and where the government is taking more and more steps to be more like Cuba.

    I think it is important that alternative Cuban cinema should be tackling the issue. Regrettably, a great many acts of retaliation survive only in the memory of the people who suffered them and friends who witnessed it, as there was no technology to record them at the time.

    http://www.havanatimes.org/?p=102542

  26. Sen. Mendedez is of course completely right. The encouraging part of what he said was about Cuban dissidents – they know the reality of their country better than anyone – not wanting sanctions lifted. However, the Cubans being involved against the protests in Vzla is kinda old news, Right now we need to be aware of the whole Cuba – Mexico – cocaine – FARC situation. It’s important for the peoples of CubaZuela that they can be allowed to live normal lives, asap, but Mexico is so much bigger and so much more important for the USA and in so many other ways. The USA cannot have a failed Mexico with that long border. Just think a second abut the immiration issues…

  27. The same is happening in Cuba and Colombia, sanctions = bad and peace = good. The demagogues don’t want us to ask How and Why. All journalists know hat those are two of the most important questions that need to be asked…

  28. ???

    And how do you know I am not demonstrating in the streets? I AM interested in everyone’s constitutional rights, unlike some dumb leftists on here who claim that such things are not important. Lemmings for dictators.

    You know, my dear, the talent that you have for picking a couple of letters out of one word and incorporating them via CAPITAL letters into another word (the me in aMErican) is so breathtakingly witty, I feel that I am in the presence of greatness.

    Have a nice day, sweetcheeks.

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