Are We Cubans More Unruly Than Other Peoples?

Telephone with the handset ripped off

Telephone with the handset ripped off

14ymedio, Generation Y, Yoani Sanchez, Havana, 30 September 2015 – “Nobody takes care of anything,” raged the lady in line at the cash register of a State butcher shop. She was referring to those who leave the refrigerators open or who put their shopping baskets on the glass counters. However, she didn’t seem to notice the lack of air conditioning, the stench coming from some of the freezers where the goods were spoiled, or the single employee taking payments, while the others looked on with their arms crossed. The customers are to blame, according to the feisty woman.

Social indiscipline has become a recurring theme in reports and interviews in the national media. Vandalism is blamed for everything, from problems with public transport buses to the deplorable state of planted areas. Official journalists raise the accusing finger more and more against the pillage, while barely addressing the educational and political system that has molded these citizens so bent on looting and destruction.

Social behavior is shaped by one’s environment. On a spotless floor, a clean sidewalk, in a cared-for city, many will imitate the environment and avoid dirtying, destroying or degrading it. Context greatly influences people’s attitude toward public spaces and common goods. But when the environment is dirty, assaulted by carelessness and becomes hostile, those who inhabit it will neither respect nor care for it.

Cubans are no more unruly than other human beings and yet, right now, a park filled with children’s play structures needs to be guarded like a bank, so that the swing seats, the iron from the carousels or the ropes from the climbing nets aren’t stolen. In poorly lit areas of the city people defecate or urinate, microdumps rise in thousands of corners and a stream of dirty water can fall from any balcony, directly on pedestrians below.

When the environment is dirty, assaulted by carelessness and becomes hostile, and those who inhabit it will neither respect nor care for it

The situation has gone on for so long that many have come to believe that it is in the DNA of our identity to not care for our surroundings. “This city couldn’t have a subway, because imagine the stink in those tunnels with people taking care of all their needs down there,” states a gentleman with the tint of a shabby official, while waiting at a bus stop.

With his words, the man suggested that we Cubans cannot enjoy the privileges of modernity and comfort, because we are unable to maintain them. However, this same “unredeemable exterminator” that we have become can get on a plane, go to New York or Berlin, and in two weeks in those place be throwing trash in the bins, not lighting up in public places, and cleaning the mud off their shoes before entering an office.

Vandalism is a problem present in all societies. Laws and control regulate it and keep it in check, but there it is. It is a part of our human nature that a moment of rage makes us take a blade and inscribe our name on a recently painted wall, or rip the fabric of a movie theater seat. Fines and other penalties should keep this vulture we all shelter within us from getting out of hand.

However, the context has to encourage people to care for things. It is not enough to call for discipline and formal education, the individual has to feel that it’s worth the trouble to preserve his or her surroundings. A street full of potholes, a late and overloaded bus, a sidewalk plunged into darkness, its single streetlight broken years ago, are the ideal components for depredation and pillage.

Many, like the lady who complained at the butcher’s, no longer perceive the scenario of constant attacks on the rights of consumers and citizens that our society presents. So accustomed to the abuse, the inefficiencies, the breakage and the high prices, they throw all the blame on those “unruly Cubans” who couldn’t “live anywhere without destroying it.”

78 thoughts on “Are We Cubans More Unruly Than Other Peoples?

  1. Omar,

    Lies are lies.

    If you copy and paste a US regulation from 50 years ago and claim it is current, that is a LIE.

    But most of what you paste was a lie 50 years ago as well.

    To repeat, there are no limits on US remittances to Cuba.

    Even when there were such regulations (briefly under George Bush), they were never enforced.

    The only risk for a US citizen sending a lot of money to Cuba is that Castro will seize it.

    That’s the only reason US citizens have to use cash couriers when sending large amounts of money to Cuba.

    The problem for them is when they get caught, Cuban immigration takes all their money.

    Castro is the thief and bully, not the USA which is bending backwards to appease Castro.

  2. Neutral observer,

    The “lies” you claim I post come from the US State Department. …or nationally/internationally recognized organizations. Your belief system reminds me of the Indian fable of the three monkeys….see no evil, speak no evil or hear no evil from the Right Wing crowd that want to live like Americans but can’t afford to pay for it

  3. I know Omar pastes a lot of lies, but try to keep them up to date Comrade.

    There are no limits on remittances from the USA to Cuba, so the US government can hardly get rid of a limit that doesn’t exist.

    Especially under Obama, the idea that a US embargo exists is a joke.

    An American can send his Cuban family a million dollars without a peep from the US government.

    The trouble is Castro seizes most of this money.

  4. EXCELLENT VIDEO! CUBAN GAMERS CREATES ILLEGAL INTERNET NETWORK! CANDELAA!!!!! CHECK OUT CUBAN DISSIDENT LEADERS Eliecer Avila AND Yoani Sanchez!

    YOUTUBE: Cuba’s really terrible internet, explained – A few years ago some computer gamers based in Havana strung a small web of ethernet cables, from house to house, so they could play video games together. The network has grown quietly and today its called StreetNet: a bootleg internet for Havana with over 10,000 users. It was an innovation forged by necessity in a country where only 5 percent of the citizens have access to the uncensored internet. Watch the why Cuba’s internet is stuck in 1995.Cuba has some of the worst internet access in the world, with just 5 percent of Cubans able to access the uncensored web. Since the communist revolution of 1959, the Castro regime has enforced a strict ban on all forms of information flow that challenge official policy and history. Enforcing such censorship has been relatively easy for an island nation that has a monopoly over all media outlets. But when the internet arrived in the ’90s, it complicated matters for the Castro’s. As Cubans get a taste for the wonder that is the internet, they want more. As internal pressure grows, the Cuban regime will likely continue to find creative ways to offer the internet without losing control of the flow of information. The opening of Cuba to foreign investment and travel will only speed up the process.

  5. DEAR Mario! YOU REALLY SHOULD NOT PUT ERRONEOUS (aka LIES) INFORMATION HERE BECAUSE I WILL GIVE YOU SUCH A FUACATAAAAAAAAAA!!!!!!!!!!!!! AND BY THE WAY, YOU NEED A DICTIONARY DEAR! YOU KNOW THAT YOU CAN FIND ONE EASILY ONLINE!

    HAVANA TIMES: Eat in Cuba, Let Relatives Pay in Miami – By Daniel Benitez (Café Fuerte) – November 15, 2014
    A new Cuban initiative to obtain dollars mainly from Miami is up and running: Dining in Havana with dollars from family or friends from abroad.

    Starting this month, state officials authorized restaurant reservations for Cubans living on the island made from abroad; people can now make invitations for lunch or dinner for their relatives or friends with all expenses paid.

    The new service began on November 1 and allows purchasers to select a table and menu, only via the internet, to 43 restaurants and cafes in four provinces: Havana (13), Villa Clara (6), Camaguey (13) and Holguin (11).

    The website http://www.bazar-virtual.ca allows those interested to choose dishes ranging in price from $13.83 dollars at the Gato Tuerto to the menu 4 at the Bodeguita del Medio for $ 28.08. Payments with Visa and Mastercard are accepted.

    http://www.havanatimes.org/?p=107350

    BLOCKADE is an effort to cut off food, supplies, war material or communications from a particular area by force, either in part or totally. A blockade should not be confused with an embargo or sanctions, which are legal barriers to trade, and is distinct from a siege in that a blockade is usually directed at an entire country or region, rather than a fortress or city. Most blockades historically took place at sea,

    EMBARGO is the partial or complete prohibition of commerce and trade with a particular country, in order to isolate it. Embargoes are considered strong diplomatic measures imposed in an effort, by the imposing country, to elicit a given national-interest result from the country on which it is imposed. Embargoes are similar to economic sanctions and are generally considered legal barriers to trade, not to be confused with blockades, which are often considered to be acts of war.[1]

  6. DEAR Mario! REMITTANCES TO CUBA ARE DONE IN SOOO MANY WAYS, INCLUDING WESTERN UNION AND PEOPLE TO PEOPLE! I USED TO SEND MONEY TO CUBA VIA CANADA. I WOULD SEND THE MONEY TO THE COMPANY Caribe Express AND THEN THEY WOULD CALL SOMEONE IN CUBA WHO HAD THE CASH AND THEY WOULD HAND DELIVER IT FOR A PERCENTAGE! THEY HAVE NOW OFFICES IN MIAMI AND OTHER PARTS OF USA! HERE IS THEIR LINK
    http://www.caribeexpress.com/Windows/money/money.aspx

    FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY: Remittances to Cuba The following reports provide information on remittances sent to Cuba by Cuban Americans:
    Cuban Emigrés Sent More Than $3.5 Billion in In-Kind Remittances in 2013, by The Havana Consulting Group, July 3, 2014.
    Cuba: $2.6 Billion in Remittances in 2012, by Emilio Morales. Havana Journal, June 11, 2013.
    https://cri.fiu.edu/cuban-america/remittance/

  7. GOOGLE OFFERED THE CASTRO OLIGARCHY FREE WI-FI FOR THE CUBAN PEOPLE AND THEY SAID NO! THE CASTRO CLAN NEVER ASKED THE POPULATION!

    VOX: Cuba’s really terrible internet, explained The internet in Cuba is so bad that Cubans had to invent their own – by Johnny Harris

    A few years ago, some computer gamers based in Havana strung a small web of ethernet cables from house to house so they could play video games together. The network continued to grow quietly, and today it’s called StreetNet: a bootleg internet for Havana with more than 10,000 users. It was an innovation forged by necessity in a country where only 5 percent of citizens have access to the uncensored internet. Watch the video to learn why Cuba’s internet is stuck in 1995.

    Cuba has some of the worst internet access in the world, with just 5 percent of Cubans able to access the uncensored web.

    Since the communist revolution of 1959, the Castro regime has enforced a strict ban on all forms of information flow that challenge official policy and history. Enforcing such censorship has been relatively easy for an island nation that has a monopoly over all media outlets. But when the internet arrived in the ’90s, it complicated matters for the Castros.

    Cuba’s first 64KB/s internet connection came to life in 1996, making it one of the first countries to connect in the Caribbean region. Cuban technicians were resourceful, educated, and motivated to connect the country, which led to a surge in initial infrastructure development.

    That surge soon stalled as the government realized the ramifications of allowing such a decentralized and uncontrollable network into the lives of the Cuban people. “The wild colt of new technologies can and must be controlled,” warned Communications Minister Ramiro Valdés in 2007, summing up the regime’s policy toward technology over the previous decade.

    CLICK LINK FOR ENTIRE ARTICLE!
    http://www.vox.com/2015/10/5/9434407/cuba-internet-explained-castro

  8. Mario:
    U.S. Department of the Treasury

    Financial Services –

    •Depository institutions will be permitted to open and maintain correspondent accounts at a financial institution that is a national of Cuba to facilitate the processing of authorized transactions.
    •U.S. financial institutions will be authorized to enroll merchants and process credit and debit card transactions for travel-related and other transactions consistent with section 515.560 of the CACR. These measures will improve the speed and efficiency of authorized payments between the United States and Cuba.

    Remittances –

    •The limits on generally licensed remittances to Cuban nationals other than certain prohibited Cuban Government and Cuban Communist Party officials will be increased from $500 to $2,000 per quarter.

    •Certain remittances to Cuban nationals for humanitarian projects, support for the Cuban people, or development of private businesses will be generally authorized without limitation. These general licenses will allow remittances for humanitarian projects in or related to Cuba that are designed to directly benefit the Cuban people; to support the Cuban people through activities of recognized human rights organizations, independent organizations designed to promote a rapid, peaceful transition to democracy, and activities of individuals and non-governmental organizations that promote independent activity intended to strengthen civil society in Cuba; and to support the development of private businesses, including small farms.

    •Authorized travelers will be allowed to carry with them to Cuba $10,000 in total family remittances, periodic remittances, remittances to religious organizations in Cuba, and remittances to students in Cuba pursuant to an educational license.
    •Under an expanded general license, banking institutions, including U.S.-registered brokers or dealers in securities and U.S.-registered money transmitters, will be permitted to process authorized remittances to Cuba without having to apply for a specific license.

    Third-Country Effects –

    •U.S.-owned or -controlled entities in third countries, including banks, will be authorized to provide goods and services to an individual Cuban national located outside of Cuba, provided the transaction does not involve a commercial exportation of goods or services to or from Cuba.
    •OFAC will generally authorize the unblocking of accounts of Cuban nationals who have permanently relocated outside of Cuba.
    •OFAC is issuing a general license that will authorize transactions related to third-country conferences attended by Cuban nationals.
    •In addition, a general license will authorize foreign vessels to enter the United States after engaging in certain trade with Cuba.

    Small Business Growth –

    •Certain micro-financing projects and entrepreneurial and business training, such as for private business and agricultural operations, will be authorized.
    •Also, commercial imports of certain independent Cuban entrepreneur-produced goods and services, as determined by the State Department on a list to be published on its website, will be authorized.

    “Cash in Advance” –

    •The regulatory interpretation of “cash in advance” is being redefined from “cash before shipment” to “cash before transfer of title to, and control of,” the exported items to allow expanded financing of authorized trade with Cuba.

    Supporting Diplomatic Relations and USG Official Business –

    •The President announced the reestablishment of diplomatic relations with Cuba. To facilitate that process, OFAC is adding a general license authorizing transactions with Cuban official missions and their employees in the United States.
    •In addition, in an effort to support important U.S. government interests, an expanded general license will authorize Cuba-related transactions by employees, grantees, and contractors of the U.S. government, foreign governments, and certain international organizations in their official capacities.

    Support for the Cuban People –

    •Exports and reexports to provide support for the Cuban people in three areas: improving living conditions and supporting independent economic activity; strengthening civil society; and improving communications – will be eligible under Commerce’s SCP license exception.
    •To improve living conditions and support independent economic activity, SCP will authorize: (1) building materials, equipment, and tools for use by the private sector to construct or renovate privately-owned buildings, including privately-owned residences, businesses, places of worship, and building for private sector social or recreational use; (2) tools and equipment for private agricultural activity; and (3) tools, equipment, supplies, and instruments for use by private sector entrepreneurs.
    •To strengthen civil society, SCP will authorize export and reexport of donated items and temporary export and reexport by travelers to Cuba of items for use in scientific, archaeological, cultural, ecological, educational, historic preservation, or sporting activities. SCP will also authorize exports and reexports to human rights organizations, individuals, or non-governmental organizations that promote independent activity intended to strengthen civil society.
    •Travelers will also be able to export temporarily items for use in professional research in the traveler’s profession or full time field of study under SCP. The activities or research must not be related to items on the United States Munitions List or items controlled for sensitive reasons on the Commerce Control List.
    •To improve communications, SCP will authorize exports and reexports of items for use by news media personnel and U.S. news bureaus.
    •SCP will not authorize the export of items on the Commerce Control List for sensitive reasons such as national security, nuclear proliferation, regional stability, missile technology, and other reasons of similar sensitivity.

    Gift Parcels –

    •Consolidated shipments of gift parcels will be eligible for the same Commerce license exception that authorizes individual gift parcels.

    Liberalizing License Application Review Policy –

    •Commerce will set forth a general policy of approval for applications to export or reexport items necessary for the environmental protection or enhancement of U.S. and international air and water quality or coastlines (including items that enhance environmental quality through energy efficiency).

  9. This time I had to think a little while about what Yoani said, but here’s what I got out of it: Cubans aren’t any different than other peoples, but decades of a country and its society decaying has caused great damage. It’s no surprise that bad attitudes take root. It will take a long time to learn the joy of ownership and responsibility for one’s life and society…

  10. So the Castristas are “only” taking 63% instead of 90+? The competition between the remittance-driven private sector and the public sector has started to kick in?
    That’s the only way the Castros can stay in power, to allow private wealth like in China or Vietnam. That’s not ideal of course, but over time academics, intellectuals, students and people in general start to think…

  11. Omar, what technology are you talking about ” that makes possible remittance to pay for services in Cuba without having to physically go to Cuba to pay for it”?

    Due to financial blockade of Cuba Paypal customers, regardless of their nationality or residence, are prohibited from paying for goods and services in Cuba.

    State enterprises still have ways to accept the payment, at a premium. The US blockade is doing more damage to owners of casa particular hostels who have less options in the finance field.

  12. DEAR Omar Fundora! LETS NOT MAKE EXCUSES FOR THE CASTRO OLIGARCHY! SINCE 2009 THEY HAD THE CHANCE TO LET US TELECOMMUNICATIONS PROVIDE CHEAPER SERVICE FOR THE CUBAN PEOPLE AND THEY WOULD HAVE HAD A CUT! BUT THEY ARE A GREEDY MONOPOLY HELD BY CASTRO CLAN AND THEY DONT WANT TO DO THAT DEAR! BUT THEY SURE LOOOVE ALL THAT “GUSANO” MONEY!!

    NEWSWEEK:Top Cuban Official Rejects Nongovernment Wi-Fi Offerings – BY TAYLOR WOFFORD – 7/13/15
    http://www.newsweek.com/top-cuban-official-rejects-google-wifi-offer-353087

    THE ECONOMIST: Cuba and the internet – Wired, at last – Mar 3rd 2011
    ACCORDING to government figures, only 3% of Cubans frequently use the internet, making the communist island the least connected place in the Americas. Those that do require patience: according to an industry survey, Cuba’s dial-up internet access is the world’s second-slowest, after Mayotte, a French territory in the Indian Ocean. Under the guise of rationing the use of bandwidth, internet access is banned in most private homes and censored in offices. In 2009 Barack Obama authorised American companies to provide internet services to the island. But Cuba showed no interest in exploring the possibility. Instead it turned to its ally and benefactor, Venezuela.
    http://www.economist.com/node/18285798

  13. Humberto: Nothing new regarding remittance. What has changed is technology that makes possible remittance to pay for services in Cuba without having to physically go to Cuba to pay for it.

  14. Humberto: Havana Times…they are okay in the bias meter scale of news media outlet. But, if you notice, they did not complete the explanation and explain the pay in services like school and healthcare (among other services the State provides). Therefore, his $1000 negotiated pay is not going into the coffers of Fidel and Raul Castro for their personal consumption, like you make it sound to be. The money is being used to meet the Cuban Constitution requirements to work against inequality in the Country and invest in sustainable development for the future of Cuba.

  15. SO NOW THE TELECOMMUNICATION MONOPOLY IN CUBA ETECSA THAT IS OWNED BY THE CASTRO OLIGARCHY IS ALLOWING THE “GUSANERA” OUTSIDE OF CUBA TO RECHARGE THEIR RELATIVE INTERNET ACCESS FROM ABROAD AT THE LOW PRICE OF $2/MINUTE! I GUESS THAT THE CASTRO CLAN DID NOT LIKE GOOGLE’S TO PUT FREE WI-FI IN CUBA BECAUSE THEY WOULD NOT BE ABLE TO CONTROL IT AND MAKE TONS OF MONEY TOO!

    HAVANA TIMES: Now You Can Pay for a Cuban’s WiFi Use from Abroad – With home Internet service unavailable to Cubans and public WiFi hot spots prohibitive in cost for the average worker/professional, the State monopoly Telecommunications Company of Cuba (ETECSA) announces that it will now allow people in other countries to pay for Cubans’ Internet use, reported Progreso Semanal. At 10 CUC (11.50 USD) relatives and friends can facilitate five hours of a Cuban’s browsing or family communications with the outside world, notes ETECSA, which said the service takes effect on October 6 at the website http://www.ding.com. To receive the gift, the Cuban on the island must have a permanent Nauta account with ETECSA. Such accounts, available by contract, are valid for 330 days and can also be reactivated by depositing funds at any commercial ETECSA office.

    http://www.havanatimes.org/?p=114246

  16. POOR Omar Fundora! WHEN HE HAS NO WAY TO RESPOND TO MY ARTICLES/VIDEOS HE STARTS POSTING “BAD OLD USA” AND/OR “BAD THE REST OF THE WORLD, EXCEPT CUBA”! HE THINKS THAT WILL ELIMINATE ALL INFORMATION ABOUT THE REALITY OF CASTRO OLIGARCHY MAFIA KINGDOM!

    HAVANA TIMES:Cuba’s Mariel Development Zone Unmasked- by Pedro Campos

    Contracted employees will receive 80 percent of the salaries agreed to by Cuban employment agencies and investors, and payments are to be made in regular Cuban pesos (CUP), at a “special” exchange rate of 1 Cuban Convertible Peso (CUC) to 10 CUP. This is as “special” as the Special Period.
    That is to say, if the employment agency negotiates a 1,000 CUC salary (or its equivalent in US dollars) for a Cuban worker, the agency will pocket the 1,000 CUC (or its equivalent in US dollars) and pay the Cuban worker (in CUP) 80 percent of the sum agreed to, at the special exchange rate of 10 CUP to 1 CUC.
    If mathematics hasn’t also been deformed by “State socialism”, this means the worker will receive 10 Cuban pesos for each CUC, which means that their salary would be 8,000 CUP (10 x 800).
    When that worker comes out of the ZEDM, in order to purchase anything at the hard-currency stores operated by Cuba’s military monopoly, they will have to resort to government exchange locales (or CADECAS), where they are required to buy CUC at an exchange rate of 25 to 1. Thus, their 8,000 Cuban pesos become 320 CUC.
    This means that, of the 1,000 CUC (or their equivalent in US dollars) paid by the investor, Cuban workers will only receive 32%. To this, we must add that the wage worker must pay an additional 5 percent for State “social security”, which means that they are ultimately only receiving 27 percent of the original 1,000 CUC.
    A total of 63 percent will go to the State, which will sit back and not “get its hands dirty” – it will pocket this only for acting as an “intermediary” between the investor, a euphemism for a foreign capitalist exploiter, and Cuban salaried workers.

    http://www.havanatimes.org/?p=103105

  17. People criticize the court system in Venezuela and foreign organizations claim that Venezuela’s court system is worse than other countries and yet according to the survey, Venezuelan courts are actually viewed favorably very close to the average which is 44% in the World. Lopez ruling was not in error, he committed treason and was judged and sentence by the People of Venezuela justly. The national government of Venezuela was viewed favorably by 42% or better than the 38% in the World.

  18. I don’t know if you folks looking at this statistics conclude the same thing I have come to conclude. The more Democratic the World has become, the more corruption and crime the World is experiencing….

  19. It looks to me, based on the surveys, that most citizens of the World are okay with their governments…is this means that Cubans are okay with the Cuban government???….less than 24% of the population in Cuba would like to see regime change in the island….this level of activism is close to being the healthy level of activism that is tolerated by most countries in the World. Cuba is doing better than most in fighting crime and corruption….are Cubans more unruly than most other People of the World???….probably not because Cubans are better trained than most other People in the World and the majority of Cubans support building a Socialist Democratic Republic in Cuba…

  20. yngso: be aware that Humberto posts focus on the bad and very seldom post facts that reflect the island nation as a whole. He seldom post anything that works in Cuba. If you want to know the truth, you should also read Cuban news media accounts or United Nations reports about Cuba. You will find the truth somewhere in the middle of the extreme bias publications about Cuba…

  21. Top Country Problems: Crime and Corruption

    Crime is seen as a very big problem by a median of 83% across the 34 emerging and developing economies surveyed. In 19 of these nations, crime is either tied for or holds the top spot among the nine problems tested. Law-breaking is more of an issue in Latin America (a median of 86% say it is a very big problem) and Africa (84%) than it is in Asia (72%) and the Middle East (67%). Crime is a lesser issue in the three Eastern Europe countries surveyed – less than half in Russia (47%), Ukraine (37%) and Poland (31%) see it as a top problem.

    Many Worry about Crime, Corruption, Health Care, Poor Schools and Pollution
    A median of 76% across 34 countries say corrupt political leaders are a very big problem in their country. This comprises the top spot in 10 of the countries surveyed, including in China, where 54% say corrupt officials are a big concern. Africans are far and away the most concerned about corruption (a median of 85%), but this issue also resonates broadly in other regions, including Eastern Europe. In Russia and Ukraine, 65% and 73% respectively cite corrupt political leaders as a top problem.
    http://www.pewglobal.org/2014/11/06/crime-and-corruption-top-problems-in-emerging-and-developing-countries/country-issues-report-08/

  22. Hi CP new guy, are you trying to be neutral or something? Then you shouldn’t be suggesting that the chief of the Lalaland dwelers write a blog…

  23. Thanks a lot for the videos Humberto! For someone like me who has never been to Cuba – but lots to say about its significance – your videos bring that reality closer…

  24. Humberto: The Brookings Institute is very astute the way they publish their article. In the article you posted, all they are doing is describing one aspect of how Cuba pays for the Welfare State. The individual complaint is the same complaint that you hear here in the United States. “boy if I did not have to pay taxes I could spend more money”….What is the difference between a Welfare State and a so called “Free Market Economy”….inequality, inequality….one has more than the other. The discarded in a Free Market Economy country has nothing. In a Middle income country like Cuba with a Welfare State, at least the poor has more than a poor in a Middle Income country with a Free Market Economy.

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